Mar 21, 2016

Loom FAQs: Is Loom Knitting Cheating?

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Most people who loom knit have at some point come across a needle knitter who tells them “that is cheating” or “that’s not real knitting”.  It can be very hurtful to be told these things.  Especially for those who are first learning.

But…  Is it cheating?  Questions that I see are  When did loom knitting first start?  Which came first needles or looms?  How can it be cheating when the stitches look exactly the same after it is made?

Personally I love it when someone sees a finished project I have made and then asks me me what size needles I used.  That look when I say “I knit this on a loom.”  Disbelief every time.

Let’s take a look at the history of loom knitting as well as the pros and cons of looms vs. needles.  Watch your toes!  Some may get stepped on by accident…

What is the earliest know knitted item?

The oldest known knitted artifact are socks from Egypt in the 11th century AD.  These socks had a very fine gauge and included colorwork as well as turned heels.  This would indicate that the art of knitting went back a lot further with no way to know where it developed or even what tool was used to knit with.

Is loom knitting new since I am just now seeing more knitting looms in stores?

Not really.  Loom knitting dates back centuries.  It hasn’t always been known as loom knitting.  Some names used were peg frame knitting from the late 14th century, stocking frame knitting for knitting stockings during the time of Queen Elizabeth I in the 16th century (which upset the needle knitters then too, by the way), as well as terms such as ring, wheel, rake, French, and spool knitting depending on the era and location.

There has just been a resurgence in the popularity of loom knitting in the past 2 decades.  More companies are mass producing knitting looms for retail making it easier to buy them.  Back in the mid to late 20th century, knitting looms could be bought, but most were by mail order only or in kid’s craft sets.  And with the advent of the internet, instructions are much easier to find than when I received my first looms as a child whether it is written instructions or video tutorials.  Also the selection of patterns has increased tremendously which is absolutely wonderful!

Which came first needles or looms?

This information is hard to find.  Some sources will say that looms predated needles and vice versa.  Probably depends on who is writing the information and which tool they prefer using…

Looming and knitting are different, aren’t they?

No.  It’s all knitting.  Looms are the tool, just as needles are the tool used.  No matter what the tool used, it’s still knitting.  People who use needles don’t call it needling…  Just saying…

But hand knitting is not the same as loom knitting…

If it’s not made with a machine, it is made by hand.  Whether it is done on needles or on a loom.  Hand knit only means that it was made with hands and not a machine.

Is loom knitting only for children?

No it isn’t.  Unless you want to count your inner child…  While there have always been a lot of loom knit kits packaged and targeted for children, it is not just a child’s toy.  Most kids do find loom knitting easier to grasp than needle knitting.  But whatever encourages their creativity to blossom!  That is the goal after all.

 

 

What are the pros and cons of looms vs. needles?

Each has it’s benefit.  Each has it’s deficit.

Let’s begin with the cost of the tools themselves.  It’s cheaper to buy needles in all sizes and gauges than it is to buy looms in all sizes and gauges.  Plus 1 for needles.

Another pro of needles is portability.  Needles take up less room than a loom does.  Most times they are more portable than looms depending on the loom.

Some will say that more can be done on needles than on looms.  That is not necessarily the case.  As far as I know, only large cables are almost impossible on looms and easier on needles due to being able to stretch the stitches across the other stitches to create the cables.  Therefore, anything that can be knit on needles can be knit on looms.

But looms have their pros as well that needles do not.

Such as it’s easier on the hands to work with looms than needles.  Lots of people with arthritis can loom knit long after needles no long become an option.

Looms are also better than needles since each stitch has it’s own “needle” making it harder to drop stitches.  This also makes traveling easier despite the size of the loom.  No worries about those stitches sliding off the needles in transit.  Not saying it can’t happen with looms.  It just doesn’t happen as often.

So…  Is loom knitting cheating?

No.  It’s just a different tool to achieve the same thing.  Each knit or purl stitch looks exactly the same once finished since the yarn itself is worked in exactly the same way to create the stitch.  Two different people can take the exact same yarn and create the exact same thing with one using a loom and the other using needles, and they will look exactly the same when finished.

Next time someone tells you that loom knitting is cheating, just smile and say thank you.  They will wonder why you thanked them.  Most likely it will annoy them as well.  There isn’t any need to get upset.  It’s all fiber art after all.  What a dreary world we would live in if we couldn’t take a “string” and create something amazing.  No matter what tool we use to do it.

I do wish we had some sort of national council to established guidelines that define everything loom knit like gauge sizes, terminology, standardize pattern writing, abbreviations, etc., just like with needles knitting and crochet.  It would help with the confusion created among the masses since there are people who are doing their own thing and creating their own terminology when writing patterns.

Hope not too many toes are sore after this!  While some people won’t agree with all I have said, it really isn’t worth getting upset over something we all enjoy and love.  And that something is KNITTING!  So grab a ball of yarn and pick up a loom or some needles and CREATE SOMETHING AMAZING!!

4 Comments

  • I am with you on the need of standards being set. I really struggle sometimes trying to understand between one pattern and another.!!

  • Thank you for the great information. I have researched loom and needle knitting as well to inform people. They find it hard to believe I am knitting until I show a finished item, then they believe. Have actually converted some folks over. Thanks again, more info to pass on.

  • Thanks for interesting article .I love loom knitting because it is easier on my hands and like you people can not believe I can whip up a baby hat in no time.

  • Hi Caroline, I can still remember when I first started loom double knitting-I was amazed at it also. I just love it. Pat

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Mar 20, 2016

Spring Blossoms Cowl

Spring Blossoms Cowl

Welcome springtime with this beautiful cowl. The Spring Blossoms cowl depicts a lovely daisy stitch created with the aid of elongated stitches. Worked in two different colors to accent the small daisies.

LOOM:  All-n-One Loom 73 pegs.

YARN:  Approx 350 yds of worsted weight of merino wool.  Knit Picks Preciosa Tonal in Tadpole and Boysenberry was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, cable needle.

GAUGE: 11sts x 13 rows = 2 inches.

SIZE:  14 x 13 inches (flat)

ABBREVIATIONScowl slanted

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

A=Main color (Boysenberry)

B=Contrasting color (Tadpole)

Daisy Chain Stitch (Row 1-Row 20 below)
(Multiple of 6 sts plus 1)

Row 1: With A, k to the end of row.

Row 2: With A, p to the end of row.

Row 3: With A, k1, *[k1, wrap yarn 3 times around peg] 5 times, k1; rep from * to end

Row 4: With A, *p1, Cluster st; rep from *, end p1.

Row 5: With A, k to end of row.

Row 6: With A, p to end of row.

Row 7-10: With B, k to the end of row.

Row 11: With A, k to the end of row.

Row 12: With A, p to the end of row.

Row 13: With A, k4, *[k1, wrap yarn 3 times around peg] 5 times, k1; rep from *, end k3.

Row 14: With A, p3, *p1, Cluster st; rep from *, end k4.

Row 15: With A, k to end of row.

Row 16: With A, p to end of row.

Row 17-20: With B, k to the end of row.

Rep rows 1-20.

Cluster st: With working yarn to the back of the loom, drop the extra wraps on the 5 pegs, slide these wraps to the cable needle and hold the cable needle, wrap the working yarn clockwise around these 5 stitches two times. Place stitches from the cable needle back on the pegs. (See pictures for how-tos).

INSTRUCTIONSDaisy Stitch Close up

Set knitting loom to 73 pegs.

With B, CO 73 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1-Row 20: Work Daisy Stitch.

Continue Daisy Stitch until panel measures 27 inches from cast on edge.

End on a Row 20. Bind off with basic bind off method.

Mattress stitch the cast on edge to bind off edge.

**To create a shawl instead of a cowl, continue knitting in the Daisy Stitch pattern until panel measures approximately 68 inches from cast on edge (end on a row 20).

Photo Tutorials (click on pictures to enlarge).

Row 3 of the Daisy Stitch Pattern states the following: With A, k1, *[k1, wrap yarn 3 times around peg] 5 times, k1; rep from * to end.

The following pictures show the steps on how to wrap the pegs and how the pegs would look after being wrapped.  Wrap the pegs counterclockwise, 3 times. Each peg should end up with 4 loops on it (the stitch, and three wraps).

wrapping pegs collage
Dropping the stitches to create the elongated stitches that will eventually create the Daisy Stitch.

Dropping stitches collage

The following pictures will show the Cluster Stitch—dropping the extra wraps, placing the stitches on the cable needle, wrapping the yarn around the middle of the stitches.

Place the elongated stitches on cable needle.

Stitches on Cable needle

Wrap the working yarn around the elongated stitches.

Wrap Cluster Collage

Place stitches from cable needle back on the pegs.

Loops back on pegs Collage

 

6 Comments

  • Fantastic!! I absolutely LOVE it! :D

  • Thank you Bethany :). It makes me happy to see the little stitches.

  • When working with 2 different colors how would you go about knitting every other stitch a different color?

  • Please guide me i am seeking help to create hoxey cowl meghan huber
    She alterates colors between stitches for seedstitch creating colorful piece
    Any one that can explain method inwould love to larn this
    Respectfully maureen.

  • Knit the row with A color skipping every other peg; then knit all the pegs you skipped with color B

  • I don’t know which cowl you are referring to. Is this a pattern on our website?

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Mar 14, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Loom Knit Monkey Hat

Designed by Jenny Stark

Mix a little fun and function with this charming hat.  Worked in a soft, fluffy yarn, this hat will be comfy, warm, and oh so cute!  Loom knit an adorable monkey hat for your favorite little ‘monkey’!

IMG_3446

Knitting Loom: KB Hat Loom Set

Yarn: 3 balls of Bernat Pipsqueak – 1 in Chocolate, 1 in Neapolitan, and 1 in Vanilla.

Scrap of worsted weight yarn for the nostrils and mouth.

Notions: knitting tool, yarn needle, scissors, buttons for eyes ( .5″ diameter), needle and thread (to attach eyes)

Gauge: Not essential for this project.

Size: Youth

Abbreviations:

K = knit stitch

K2tog = knit 2 together (decrease)

M1 = make 1 (increase)

P = purl stitch

Sl = slip

Techniques

Double E-wrap Cast-On:  Wrap the first peg twice.  With the knitting tool, pull the lower wrap past the upper wrap and over the top of the peg.  Repeat this process for each of the remaining pegs.  Cast on is now complete.  Continue on as directed in the pattern.

U-wrap Knit Stitch:  Bring the working yarn in front of the peg to be worked, above the existing stitch on the peg.  Bend the working yarn around the peg, creating a u shaped wrap. Knit the lower stitch over the u wrap.

Slip:  For the purposes of this project, slip simply means to skip the peg.

Make 1:  For the purposes of this project, simply cast on an additional stitch using the double e-wrap cast on method.

K2tog:  Decrease- worked over two pegs.  Move the stitch from the first peg over to the second peg.  Knit both stitches on the second peg together as one.

Gathered Bind Off:  Loosely wrap the working yarn in a circle around all of the pegs that have stitches – two times.  This will ensure that the yarn tail is long enough to complete the bind off.  Cut the working yarn, then unwrap the long yarn tail from around the pegs.  Lay the yarn tail below the stitch on peg 1.  Using the knitting tool, pull the yarn tail up through the stitch.  *Lay the yarn tail below the next stitch.  Using the knitting tool, pull the yarn tail up through the stitch.  Repeat from * for all stitches on the loom.  Once all stitches have been bound, remove the knitting from the loom.  Pull on the yarn tail to cinch the opening closed (unless otherwise directed by the pattern being worked).  Bind off is now complete.

Basic Bind Off:  Knit the first two pegs.  Move the stitch from the second peg over to the first peg.  Knit the lower stitch over the upper stitch.  One stitch has now been bound off. Move the stitch from peg 1 to the empty peg.  This is now peg 1.  Knit the next stitch.  Move the stitch that was just knit over to the first peg.  Knit the lower stitch over the upper stitch.  Continue working in this manner until there is one stitch left. Cut the working yarn, leaving a yarn tail that is at least 4” long.  Wrap the yarn tail around the last peg.  Knit the last stitch over the yarn tail and pull the yarn tail out through the stitch.  Bind off is now complete.

 

Instructions

Set up

Small loom, small gauge (68 pegs)

(2) 25 peg rounded loom pieces

(4) 3 peg connectors

(2) 3 peg rails

Connect the components listed above to create the small size/small gauge loom:

IMG_3449

Hat

(Worked in the round)  With the Neapolitan yarn, cast on 68 stitches using the double e-wrap cast on method.

Rounds 1-12:  K2, P2 to the end of the round.

Switch to the Chocolate yarn.

Rounds 13-40:  E-wrap knit to the end of the round.

Rounds 41-42:  K3, P1 to the end of the round.

Remove the hat from the loom using the gathered bind off method.  Carefully gather the top of  the hat closed and weave in all yarn ends.

 

Ears  (make 2)

With the Chocolate yarn, cast on 5 stitches using the double e-wrap cast on method. (Leave a 6″ yarn end)

Row 1:  Sl 1, K4.

Row 2:  P4, K1.

Row 3:  Sl 1, K3.

Row 4:  P3, K1.

Row 5:  Sl 1, K2.

Row 6:  P2, K1.

Row 7:  Sl 1, K1.

Row 8:  P1, K1.

Repeat rows 1-8 eight times.  Repeat rows 1-2 once more.  Remove the ear from the loom using the basic bind off method.  Leave a 6″ yarn end.

Use the yarn ends to sew an ear to each side of the hat.  (Tip:  Try placing the hat on a Styrofoam head before choosing ear placement.)  Weave in all yarn ends.

 

Muzzle

With the Vanilla yarn, cast on 5 stitches using the double e-wrap cast on method. (Leave a 7″ yarn end)

Row 1:  Sl 1, K4.

Row 2:  M1, P4, K1.

Row 3:  M1, K6.

Row 4:  M1, P6, K1.

Row 5:  M1, K8.

Row 6:  M1, P8, K1.

Row 7:  Sl 1, K9.

Row 8:  Sl 1, P8, K1.

Row 9:  Repeat row 7.

Row 10:  Repeat row 8.

Row 11:  Repeat row 7.

Row 12:  Repeat row 8.

Row 13:  Sl 1, K7, K2tog.

Row 14:  Sl 1, P6, K2tog.

Row 15:  Sl 1, K5, K2tog.

Row 16:  Sl 1, P4, K2tog.

Row 17:  Sl 1, K3, K2tog.

Row 18:  Sl 1, P3, K1.

Remove the muzzle from the loom using the basic bind off method.  Leave a 10″ yarn end.

Use the yarn ends to sew the muzzle in place on the front of the hat, just above the brim.  Weave in all yarn ends.

Using the needle and thread, sew the button eyes in place, just above the muzzle.

Thread the worsted weight yarn into the tyarn needle and add nostrils and a mouth to the muzzle.

 

Pom pom

Using the Chocolate yarn, the Neapolitan yarn, and the Vanilla yarn, all held together as one, create a large pom pom.  (The pom pom in the sample was created by wrapping all 3 strands of yarn around my hand, approximately 30 times.)  Attach the pom pom to the top of the hat and weave in the yarn ends.

Happy Loom Knitting!

IMG_3443

 

 

3 Comments

  • For the ears it says “Repeat rows 1-8 eight times.” How many times is the repeat? I’m so confused.

  • nvm I read it again and it says repeat 8 times. Oops – my mistake! Such a cute hat, I think I’ll make one for my niece.

  • I like what you guys are up too. Such clever work and reporting!
    Keep up the great works guys I’ve incorporated you guys to blogroll.

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Mar 11, 2016

Mila’s Zippy Cowl

 

 

Mila's Cowl

Creating last minute gift with the Zippy loom is a breeze!

LOOM:  Zippy Loom. Option: 4 Zippy and connectors. 4 Zippy and (4) corners.

YARN:  Approx 80 yds of Jumbo (size 7) acrylic yarn.  Lion Brand Color Clouds in Travelers Tan was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

GAUGE: 4.25sts x 6 rows = 4 inches.

SIZE:  11” wide x 18” long.

ABBREVIATIONS

  • Approx=approximately
  • k=knit stitch
  • p=purl stitch
  • CO=Cast on
  • BO=Bind off
  • st(s)=stitch(es)
     

INSTRUCTIONS

Set Zippy loom to work in the round (4) Zippy and (4) Corners.

CO 16 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Rnd 1-Rnd 7: k to end of row.

Rnd 8: p to the end of row. 

Rnd 9: k to end of row. 

Rep Row 8-Row 9: 4 times. 

Rep Rows 1-9: 2 more times. 

Next: Bind off with basic removal method, leaving a 16 inch yarn tail.

Mattress stitch the cast on edge to bind off edge. Weave ends in. Block lightly.

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Mar 7, 2016

Stitchology 19 : Irish Moss

March is the month filled with green and all things Irish!  Also known as Double Moss Stitch, this month’s design is another one of those wonderful stitches that consist of only knits and purls— perfect for a quick knit with loads of texture and possible future uses. This stitch’s compact nature resembles single crochet.  It also lays flat, and is completely identical from front to back, making it perfect for use on items that will be seen from both sides.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Irish Moss Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in kiwi)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

This versatile stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to pretty much any type of project.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 4—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The abbreviation “rep” stands for “repeat”.

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 40 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  P40

Row 2:  K40

Row 3:  P40

Main Pattern Rows

Row 4:  K3, *p1, k1, rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 5: P3, *k1, p1, rep from * to last st, p1.

Row 6: K2, *p1, k1, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 7: P2, *k1, p1, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Rows 8-62:  Rep Rows 4-7, ending with Row 6.

Finishing Rows

Row 63: P40

Row 64:  K40

Row 65:  P40

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

8 Comments

  • Beautiful work, Bethany! Stitchology is such a fabulous resource for the loom knitting community.

  • It lists rows 4,5,6,7 then 10 then followed by rows8-62, in the written part I’m confused. Do we go to row 8 after 7 and repeat the pattern and for get about row 10 in written part?

  • Haha! Oopsie, you are correct. There was an errant row left in there from the template. I have corrected the pattern to *not* have that Row 10. ;) Thanks for the heads up!

  • Awww…thank you so much, Jenny! I hope it is and will remain so! :)

  • Absolutely beautiful Bethany! I feel inspired to make a dishcloth or an afghan square out of this. I love stitchology; I have learned so much from these articles. :)

  • Yay, thank you, Colleen! You make me smile, as inspiration and knowledge is the point of the whole column. I’m so happy to hear things like this to know that it is doing its job! :D

  • I have been looking all over for something like this…never thought to check out this blog. The idea behind stichology, and the way it is set up is great. I like that it has both charts and written instructions. Now I can finally make pretty well anything I want with my 28″ KB. Thanks for all the work you put into stitchology.

  • Cath, this is so nice of you…I’m so pleased to hear you enjoy Stitchology and find it so useful! :D We will be looking for the stitches featured in your future projects. :)

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Mar 3, 2016

Zippy Loom Youtube Contest!

Do you have great zippy ideas? What have you made on your zippy looms? Make a video of your creative idea and enter to win prizes!!

VideoContest_BlogImage

Entering is as simple as using the Zippy! We are looking for creativity and originality on fun ways to use the zippy loom.

3 Simple Steps…

1. Take a video using Zippy loom
2. Post on youtube, and put in subject “zippy video contest”
3. Send us a link, contest@knittingboard.com

Some ideas for video…How-to knit? Kids knitting on Zippy? Use of innovative material on Zippy. How many Zippys can you knit with? Do your pets like Zippy? Don’t have a Zippy, that’s OK too, make a video on what you would make if you had a Zippy.  These are a few ideas. Have fun with Zippy and enter as many times as you like.

Each person who enters receives a prize! AND 3 placing prize winners will be chosen, and videos shared on blog and social media.

Videos will be judged on number of views and content! Contest ends April 15th.

Grand Prize: $300.00!LH9A7199c
Runner Up Prize: Loom and accessory package worth $100.00
Honorable Mention: Loom of your choice

What’s on your Zippy Loom??

4 Comments

  • I cannot find the info for the BUY 2 ZIPPY”S&GET 1 FREE Offer that is mentioned in the header on the Home page. I am interested in checking the offer out, please. Thanks.
    The Zippy is super cool, I have been making scarfs with the ruffle yarn, using just one. Made a neckwarmer in a short time today.

  • Hi Bonnie,

    When you put 2 Zippys in your cart the 3rd will pop in there. No coupon needed.
    Kim

  • Can I purchase zippy corner and 1 loom and get another loom for free or does it have to be 2 looms and get a third free.

  • Hi Ginny, This special is pretty much set and the bonus loom is automatic; it does require 2 zippy loom to be purchased. If you purchase 2 looms and 1 set of corners, it will automatically send you a free loom. Make the extra loom a gift or save it for another time. Thank you.

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Feb 29, 2016

Double Knit 101 Tutorial

Introduction to Double Knit – Part I

knittingboard28_newbluesmThe hobby of knitting, at one time, was simple. You would pick out a yarn; it was most likely a worsted weight in assorted colors. With just 2 needles and some guidelines, you could be making a scarf. Then the yarn selection began to grow and over the years, we saw all the new fibers and combinations that were being offered. It was no longer just a Worsted World. The huge, biggie yarns are really trending now, and a lot of fun. We also have boucle and eyelash, sock and glitter. Just look at all the great color combinations on the store shelves. Then, there’s all the different size needles and the circular needles and accessories like stitch holders, markers, gauge guides, darning needles, gauge counters, double ended, ring markers, blocking wires, row counters, as well as all the different sizes of each one.

Then, we add knitting looms in all shapes and sizes with double knit and single knit, and knit in the round, and knit panels, long circular, adjustable, rake, sock, and on and on. It’s no wonder a person gets confused when they say to a friend, “I want to learn to knit, but I have never been able to figure it all out.”
As we go along and time passes, we keep seeing more new gadgets, and helpful tools. We ask a question and get an earful of knitting terms, complex explanations, and a helpful person saying, “its so easy and quick, anyone can learn to knit.” So you decide to buy a book, and find that there are over 350+ book titles with the same promise, “its so easy to learn this way.” So, you go to the internet and start reading, and joining groups and blogs and picking out patterns that you like, and save them. Then, there’s those terms again and the abbreviations, and the charts, and the gauges, and the various cast ons, bind offs, skip this and skip that, and finally you decide its just too confusing.

So after all the time and money spent, you want to come out with something, so you knit a scarf. You don’t like it- so you give it away, and feel good about yourself. You put the ‘stuff’ away, until later, when you may decide to try it again.

Has anyone been down this road before? Maybe 10 years ago, or, maybe just recently? I guess it’s like anything else you enjoy-it becomes a hobby for you, and your favorite pastime. It relaxes you, and you continue learning from all the media, knit friends, and personal experience. But for those just starting out, we are going to attempt to take some of the confusion out of just one form of knitting– double knitting on a loom! We are going to start from scratch, so that ‘anyone can learn to do double knit’. See, I said it too! So, let’s breakdown all the terms and uncertainty as we go. I’m Pat Novak and have been doing double knit on a loom for 15 years after designing and knitting with 2 needles for 5 years. But, its so amazing how much has emerged; I get confused with all the new and wonderful things and ideas I see coming out of other knitters. There are amazing designers out there. It’s sure a hobby that you never outgrow, or ever run out of new ideas and designs to learn. So, hopefully, once you get the basics, you will enjoy the journey of a continuing loom knitting education, from all sources. We want to offer these articles with the basic info, the ground roots, to get you started out, with lots of success.

What is double knit?

You hear the term when looking at fabric, or in clothing-it is called double knit jersey. It means that the fabric is woven with 2 layers of thread, which makes it stretchy and durable. It’s the same in knitwear that is double knit; you create a fabric with 2 layers of yarn that is woven together. Remember that-it’s woven together, or interlocked. It can be bulky and thick, or thin and lacey. Being interlocked is different from a knitted circular tube. This is why you do not get a knit side and a purl side to your knitting. The result is the same knit side on both back and front creating a reversible fabric. So, for the afghan or scarf, it can flip around and have the same look on both sides.  This is especially beneficial when you add colorwork to the knit.  This will come later.

Getting started doing your double knit, will require a loom with 2 rows of needles or pegs across from each other. The pegs are usually placed directly across from the other row. So, you need 2 rails that are connected at the ends. The spacing between the rails, is determined by some type of spacer, holding them in place. The amount of space between the rails determines the size of the stitches created. For example, we are showing the KB 10” knitting board. It has 2 rails, each with 24 pegs that are placed directly across from each other. The little block of wood between them is set at 1cm – 3cm apart. They are held together with long bolts and wing nuts. Each stitch in double knit requires both pegs, one on each rail. So this loom or knitting board has 24 double stitches. By weaving the yarn back and forth across both rails, the resulting knit will be interlocked, or one single double knit fabric.

 

Now, you are probably wondering what the fabric will look like in double knit-will it be too thick if it is double? Good question!

This all depends on the yarn chosen and the gauge of the knitting. Yarn can be used from very fine to bulky. We will show you the difference with #3 (DK) yarn (just a little thinner than worsted weight) vs #6 (Bulky/thick) yarn, and also the 2cm spacing.

But we also want to look at the comparison with different spacing between the 2 rows of pegs. This measurement between the peg rails will change the size of the stitch. With larger stitches, the knitted width can also change.  For illustration, we will use the rail spacing of 1cm apart compared to 3cm apart.  Then we’ll be looking at very thin yarn with 2cm spacing.

 

 

CM1-Yarn 3 best

Here is a sample of working with 1cm spacing.  This means there is 7/8″ between the pegs from one row to the pegs on other row. The yarn is #3 DK weight and the gauge of knitting is 4 stitches in one inch of knitting.  You can see the rows on the ruler.

For a piece of knitting 4″ wide, you would cast on 16 stitches.

This is a nice tight, smooth knit great for most items.

Yarn shown is Paton’s Classic Wool, DK Superwash, all wool.


3CM-yarn 3best

This sample was knit with same #3 DK yarn, but with the spacing of 3cm or 1-9/16″ from peg to peg.  So the only difference in this and the previous one is the size of the stitches.  The blue needle is marking the first stitch so you can see that there are only 2.5 stitches for each inch of knit. 

So, to get the same 4″ of knitting, you would cast on just 10 stitches.  If you worked with 16 stitches, you would get a wider piece of knit.  You can also see in this sample that the stitches are much looser so it will create a more open weave; it is not solid, as you can see the white background behind the loops.

This setting makes really soft, loose knit scarves and shawls.

cm3.yarn6 (2)

 

 

 

Now, let’s look at the difference with the same setting of 3cm on the loom, but use a #6 bulky yarn.  The openness closes up and the knit is solid and bulky.  Great when you want to achieve that chunky look and the extra warmth.  As you can see, there are only 2 stitches for each inch.  If you still wanted a 4″ scarf, you would only need to cast on 8 stitches.

This thick, bulky knit is really trending now in scarves and hats and warm afghans.  Knitting at this gauge goes really quickly also.

This yarn is Loops and Threads, Cozy Wool, acrylic & wool

 

 

 

 

 

 

What if you want to do a lacy, open weave scarf, but you like the concept of doing it in double knit?  Can that be achieved with a knitting board?  Just look at these samples…is this what you were thinking about?  Again, this is using the more open spacing of 2cm, which is 1.25 inches from peg to peg, but choosing to work with a very fine #1 yarn, and #2.   You can achieve a very lacy look with ‘fluffy’ yarns as well in #1 and 2 weight yarns.

This yarn is Lion Brand, Sock-Ease in wool/nylon, #1.          Here is same setting of 2cm with #2 sock yarn.

cm2.yarn1 cm2.yarn2-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, we can see that there are many looks to achieve with double knit, just as there are in single knit, and knitting with needles.  This is why most patterns, that may seem intimidating at first, will always give you 4 ingredients:  one is how the project will look when completed, two is the loom that was used and how it was set up, three is the yarn that was used, and forth is the gauge that was achieved, or, how many stitches = one inch of knitting.  Next month, we will look at the some of the ways to cast on the loom, bind off, and some basic stitches.  We will explore some little tips for getting going with the great hobby of double knitting on a knitting board loom.  We’ll also look at a simple pattern using those techniques.

12 Comments

  • Great article Pat. Really explains the difference in spacing and use of yarn in spacing. Although I double knit all the time, I can always learn new things. Thanks for sharing with everyone. Can’t wait to see the next one.

  • I’ve tried double knitting once (with the aid of a video), but your tutorial definitely helped me understand it a bit better. Also I hate doing gauge, but I think that was because I didn’t know how to do it properly. I can’t wait for the next tutorial as I’d like to learn more about double knitting! :)

  • Thanks Sue.

  • Hi Colleen, doing a swatch for checking gauge is always boring, but saves so much ‘error’ in the overall project.

  • Yeah so true. I think I will attempt a gauge swatch next project, your article made it seem pretty simple to find gauge for double knitting :) Thanks!

  • I’m so glad you’re talking about double knitting! Aside from your website, it’s very hard to find good information that isn’t confusing.

    I hope you consider at some point doing more with cables in double knit. Cables are so popular right now, but with the exception of your basic cables video, there is very little information for double knitting.

  • Thank you Pat for this great tutorial. I like how double knitting looks and want to learn more. It’s great that you started from the basics and I’ll follow this topic for sure. I know that these are more advanced topics, but I would love to learn about color work and brioche using the knitting boards. Is there a possibility in the future?

  • Hi Jen, We want to go thru all the bare basics and then keep going to cover the more advanced stitches and cables, as well as color work. We’ll have fun with it. Pat

  • Hi Claudia, We can cover it all slowly. And anyone can jump in with other ideas also. Pat

  • Hi, Pat,
    Just found your 101 double knitting entry. I have been working on loom knitting technique for about four years. I have learned a lot from this site on both single and double knitting. Thanks for the comparative presentation of the various settings.

    The biggest challenge for me is to incorporate increases and decreases to achieve shapes and textures. I try to transcribe Barbara Walker’s recipes into loom knitting.

    May this craft and its practitioners live long and prosper.
    Rani

  • Beautifully informative. I am looking forward to future postings. Thank you.

  • Hi Pat,
    Thanks for doing this! This is my favorite topic in loom knitting. It’s hard to find many patterns and information for double knitting on the loom.I am wondering if there might be a double knit loom-along in the future?
    Thanks again and I am eagerly looking forward to the next installment!
    Dale

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Feb 19, 2016

Woodlands Throw (Double Knit)

Blanket_WoodlandsDesign by Jacque Darragh

See beautiful soft stripes emerge from the one yarn. Stitch pattern creates lots of texture.

Loom:  28” Knitting Board + peg extenders for double knit set at 2cm spacing.

Yarn:  Lion Brand Scarfie, 4 skeins.  Cream/Taupe. 312 yds. per skein.  Bulky weight. Hand wash and dry flat.

Stitches:  Rib, Stockinette, and Honeycomb pattern

Finished Sizes:  34 x 44 inches

Notions Needed:  Knit hook and crochet hook

Gauge:  2 sts X 3 rows=1 inch

 

 

 

 

Continue reading »

5 Comments

  • Beautiful! Two questions, what is the spacing between rows and is there a graphic of the peg wrap?

  • Hi Melissa, the boards are at mid spacing or 2cm apart. You can look at the pictorial instructions on knitting board website. If you go to the Criss cross stitch under Double Knit, the weaving is the same, but this design works 2 rows of each stitch pattern. So the whole Honeycomb pattern is a total of 4 rows.

  • Thank you!

  • I love these! So beautiful. I a newbie, but learning fast. Do you have a pattern for the hat?

  • The hat pattern was written by designer and will be posted soon.

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Feb 15, 2016

Loom FAQs: How Are Hat Brims Made?

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Hats are one of the first things people learn when learning to loom knit.  But the questions abound.  How do I made a brim?  How do I keep it from rolling up?  How many ways are there to make brims?

Glad you asked!  There are various ways to make brims on hats depending on what kind of look you are wanting.

Rolled Brim

Curly_cute_hat_medium

 

These are fun brims and makes an easy hat since all knit will roll up naturally.

How to work the rolled brim:

Cast on and knit all the rows after the cast on for approximately 3 inches.  It doesn’t matter which version of the knit stitch you use or the type of cast on you use.  All knits will curl.

Continue working the hat in whatever stitch pattern you wish and let the brim roll up on it’s own.

 

 

 

No Brim

cabled_hatscarf__80054.1419468139.1280.1280

 

These hats are worked in a stitch pattern that doesn’t curl.  The entire hat is worked in the same stitch pattern for the entire length so that there isn’t a brim at the bottom.

How to work the no brim:

Cast on and work the entire hat in a stitch pattern that doesn’t curl like ribbing, garter stitch, basket weave, seed stitch, moss stitch, etc.

 

 

 

Turned Up Brim

cable_hat turned up brim

 

Hats with turned up brims are just worked longer than the desired length so that the bottom may be turned up for the brim.  Rib stitch is common for these types of brims.

How to work a turned up brim:

Cast on and work the brim in whichever stitch pattern desired for twice the length of the brim.

Continue working the remainder of the hat in whatever other stitch desired.

 

 

 

Folded Brim

paving stones

 

This is usually the first type of brim most loom knitters learn since it can be worked with all knit such as e-wrap and won’t curl.  This brim is double the thickness of the fabric since the work is folded up and attached to the rest of the hat as you go.

How to work the folded brim:

All knits or any stitch pattern can be used.  Use the e-wrap cast on and work until the length is twice that desired for the brim.

Bring the cast on edge back up and place on the pegs so that the brim is folded up on the inside of the loom.  There will be 2 loops on each peg.

Knit the bottom loop over the top loop and continue working the remainder of the hat.

Ribbed/Garter/Other Stitch Pattern Brims

TweedCableBeanie Rib Brim

 

These brims are just worked in whichever stitch pattern desired that is different from the rest of the hat.

While rib and garter are the most common stitch patterns to use for brims, any stitch pattern that doesn’t curl may be used.

How to work a stitch pattern brim:

Cast on and work the desired length of the brim in whichever stitch pattern desired.

Then continue with the remainder of the hat in another stitch pattern.

 

 

 

Brims can be just as varied as types of hats.  A different brim will change the look of a hat as well.  Each person prefers something different which is what makes life so varied and interesting.

Here’s to all the brims and variations that make our lives complete!  Happy loom knitting!

6 Comments

  • Great article. As always I learn some thing very useful and explained very well

  • how do you get lattice look like on the rainbow hat with black ? or ive seen some with hearts and different designs

  • Katie Leeck, if you click on the picture, it will take you to the free pattern.

  • thanks Renita

  • I was just coming to this site to ask this very question! How would I do a brim in a different size than the hat itself? Using the A.I.O loom, and let’s say the brim in a 60 peg, but the hat itself in an 80 peg. Would I just add a M 1 on each round 5 pegs each side of the short side?

  • This is a very great concise article. Thank you for writing it. I always look forward to your articles. Hats were always frustrating for me. Things were looking awesome and after all that work it would eventually start to curl. I finally conquered it and I have made many cute hats for my grandkids. Easter is just around the corner. Maybe I’ll make the hats out of cotton.

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Feb 12, 2016

Crayon Box Throw (double knit)

Design by Jacquelyn Darragh

Work with the Ribbing stitch in this fun, colorful throw. The bright colors and bold stripes make this a simple knit favorite and with the double knit, double the warmth!

throw_crayon_box

Knitting Loom:  28” Knitting Board + extenders set up for double knit at 2 cm spacing

Yarn: Hobby Lobby’s I Love this Yarn, Worsted Weight, 100% Acrylic, 355 yards per skein. Machine washable and dryable Colors: Grape, 2 skeins. Pink, Tropical Pink, Yellow, Peacock Blue, 1 skein each. Neon Green, I Love this Yarn, Worsted Weight , 255 yards per skein. 1 skein

Stitches: Rib Stitch and Stockinette

Notions: Knit hook, crochet hook

Gauge: 5 stitches X 6 rows = 2 inches

 Size: 28 x 34 inches

Instructionscrayonbox_blanket2

Use two strands of yarn as one, throughout the making of this throw. When you are knitting a solid color, for example, grape rib stitch, just use both ends of the skein of yarn, pulling one strand from the center and one strand from the outside. When using two different colors together, it will be much easier if you use one strand of each pulling from the center of the skein, which will keep them from tangling.

With each color change, cut yarn and knot after tying on the next color. Always tie on new color at 2nd stitch so that knots do not show from outer edge.

Cast on: 64 stitches in Stockinette stitch with Grape yarn. Lay contrasting anchor yarn.

Note: Complete throw is worked in Rib Stitch until you come to the bind off row.

Rib Stitch: After the cast on, start first row by wrapping the top 1st peg and bring down to the bottom 3rd peg. You are skipping peg 1 and 2 on lower board. Your yarn is at an angle. Now go back up to top board to 3rd peg and wrap. Take yarn down to lower 5th peg. Continue wrapping every other peg at this angle till you get to the end of your stitches. To return, take yarn around end of pegs to wrap the top last peg. Continue by wrapping all the empty pegs. You will see that you are going back with peg 1 to 3 again and working at the opposite angle. This is what creates the ribs. It is correct that the last pegs are wrapped consecutively. Hook over all pegs. Repeat for each row according to color design.

Knit 5 rows Grape yarn. Tie on Lime yarn. Do not cut the Grape, but carry it in along with Lime yarn.

Knit 1 row in Lime. Cut Lime and knot.

Knit 3 rows Grape. Tie in Lime yarn. Cut grape and knot.

Knit 3 rows in Lime.   Cut the one strand of yarn coming from the outside of the skein and tie on one strand of the Blue yarn from the inside of the blue skein.

Treating the two yarns as one, knit 5 rows of Blue and Lime in rib. Cut and tie off the Lime yarn. Tie on the other end of the Blue yarn so that you now have both strands of Blue.

Knit 5 rows in Blue. Cut the blue yarn and tie off. Tie on Yellow yarn.

Knit 2 rows in Yellow. Cut and tie off the Yellow yarn. Tie on the Grape yarn.

Knit 2 rows in Grape. Cut and tie off the Grape yarn. Tie on two strands of the Pink yarn.

Knit 4 rows in Pink.   Cut one strand of Pink yarn coming from the outside of the skein and tie on one strand of the yarn from the inside of the Tropical Pink skein.

Treating the two yarns as one, knit 5 rows of Pink and Tropical Pink rib. Cut and tie off the Pink yarn. Tie on the other end of the Tropical Pink yarn so that you now have both strands of Tropical Pink.

Knit 5 rows of Tropical Pink. Cut both strands of yarn and tie off. Tie on 2 strands of Grape yarn.

Knit 5 rows of Grape. Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Pink.

Knit 5 rows of Pink. Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Blue.

Knit 5 rows of Blue. Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Tropical Pink.

Knit 5 rows of Tropical Pink. Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Lime.

Knit 5 rows of Lime. Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Grape.

Knit 5 rows of Grape. Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Tropical Pink.

Knit 5 rows of Tropical Pink. Cut one strand of Tropical Pink yarn coming from the outside of the skein, and tie on one strand of the yarn from the inside of the Pink skein.

Treating the two yarns as one, knit 5 rows of Pink and Tropical Pink. Cut and tie off the Tropical Pink yarn. Tie on the other end of the Pink yarn so that you now have both strands of Pink.

Knit 4 rows of Pink. Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Grape.

Knit 2 rows in Grape. Cut and tie off the Grape yarn. Tie on the Yellow yarn.

Knit 2 rows in Yellow. Cut and tie off the Yellow yarn. Tie on two strands of the Blue yarn.

Knit 5 rows of Blue. Cut one strand of blue yarn coming from the outside of the skein and tie on one strand of the Lime yarn from the inside of the blue skein.

Treating the two yarns as one, knit 5 rows of Blue and Lime. Cut and tie off the Blue yarn. Tie on the other end of the Lime yarn, so that you now have both strands of Lime.

Knit 3 rows in Lime.   Cut and tie off yarn. Tie on 2 strands of Grape.

Knit 3 rows in Grape. Do not cut grape yarn but let it carry through. Tie on 2 strands of Lime and knit one row of Lime. Cut and tie off Lime yarn.

Knit 5 rows in Grape.

Knit 1 row in Grape Stockinette stitch.

Bind off the board remembering that you are still treating 2 strands as one, so each side of the board in which you are doing the crochet bind off, will have two loops. Weave in ends.

Bind off the anchor yarn treating 2 strands as one. Lift two loops over two loops. Weave in ends.

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Feb 8, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Cotton Love

Design by Jenny Stark

Love is in the air this month and hearts in all colors, shapes, and mediums abound.  Get ‘cotton love’ with these adorable double-knit cotton hearts.  Because they work up so quickly, you’ll have time to make one for all of the sweethearts in your life.

hearts_jenny

Knitting Loom: 32 peg loom

Yarn: 100 % cotton yarn in worsted weight.  Peaches & Crème and Sugar n Cream cotton yarns were used in the samples.

Notions: knitting tool, yarn needle, scissors.

Gauge: Not essential for this project.

Size: Approximately 5.5” x 5.75”

Abbreviations:

DZ st – Duplicate Zigzag Stitch

l – left

r – right

 

Techniques2016-02-10 14.06.49

Duplicate Zigzag Stitch:  The Duplicate Zigzag Stitch (DZ st) is worked on both sides of the knitting board/loom.  The wraps will travel at a slight slant.  In this stitch pattern, one peg at the beginning of each row will serve as a sort of turning peg and will not be wrapped.  When working from left to right, the turning peg is the first peg on the lower board.  When working from right to left, the turning peg is the last wrapped peg on the upper board.

Wrapping in DZ st, l-r:  (Working yarn will be at the first wrapped peg on the lower board).  Take the working yarn to the upper board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Take the working yarn back down to the lower board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Continue working in this manner until all pegs have a second wrap on them, except the turning peg.

IMG_3386

Knit the pegs that have two wraps on them.

Wrapping in DZ st, r-l:  (Working yarn will be at the last wrapped peg on the upper board).  Take the working yarn down to the lower board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Take the working yarn back to the upper board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Continue working in this manner until all the pegs have a second wrap on them, except the turning peg.

IMG_3387

Knit the pegs that have two wraps on them.

 

Work back and forth across the board in DZ st until the knitted fabric reaches the desired length, or as directed in the pattern.

 

Instructions

*This project is double knit.  This means that the project will be worked back and forth, using the upper and lower board of the loom.  Lower board = the rail and pegs closest to you.  Upper board = the rail and pegs farther from you.  The board will not be rotated, so the lower board and the upper board will not change.  For this project, disregard the 2 pegs at each end of the knitting loom.  They are not included in the peg counts for this design.  So, peg one of the lower board would be the first peg on the left hand side of the rail closest to you.

*Work with 2 strands of yarn held together as one throughout this project.

 

Cast On

Make a slip knot and place it on the 7th peg of the lower board.

Wrap the 8th peg on the upper board in a counter clockwise direction.

IMG_3373

Wrap the 8th peg on the lower board in a clockwise direction.

IMG_3374

Wrap the 9th peg on the upper board in a counter clockwise direction.

IMG_3375

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Cast on is now complete.

Bottom of the Heart

Increase #1:

Wrap peg 7 on the upper board in a clockwise direction.

IMG_3379

Wrap peg 6 on the lower board in a counter clockwise direction.

IMG_3380

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #2:

Wrap peg 9 on the lower board in a clockwise direction.

IMG_3382

Wrap peg 10 on the upper board in a counter clockwise direction.

IMG_3383

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #3:

Wrap peg 6 on the upper board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 5 on the lower board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #4:

Wrap peg 10 on the lower board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 11 on the upper board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #5:

Wrap peg 5 on the upper board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 4 on the lower board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #6:

Wrap peg 11 on the lower board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 12 on the upper board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #7:

Wrap peg 4 on the upper board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 3 on the lower board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #8:

Wrap peg 12 on the lower board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 13 on the upper board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #9:

Wrap peg 3 on the upper board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 2 on the lower board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase #10:

Wrap peg 13 on the lower board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 14 on the upper board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Increase # 11:

Wrap peg 2 on the upper board in a clockwise direction.

Wrap peg 1 on the lower board in a counter clockwise direction.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

 

Left Curve

Move the stitch from peg 7 on the lower board to peg 6 on the lower board.

IMG_3388

Work in DZ st, l-r until peg 6 on the lower board has been wrapped and peg 7 on the upper board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on peg 6 of the lower board.)

Decrease #1:

Move the stitch on peg 1 of the lower board to peg 2 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 2 of the upper board to peg 3 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Work in DZ st, l-r until peg 6 on the lower board has been wrapped and peg 7 on the upper board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Decrease #2:

Move the stitch on peg 2 of the lower board to peg 3 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 3 of the upper board to peg 4 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Work in DZ st, l-r until peg 6 on the lower board has been wrapped and peg 7 on the upper board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Decrease #3:

Move the stitch on peg 3 of the lower board to peg 4 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 4 of the upper board to peg 5 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Work in DZ st, l-r until peg 6 on the lower board has been wrapped and peg 7 on the upper board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Decrease #4:

Move the stitch on peg 4 of the lower board to peg 5 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 5 of the upper board to peg 6 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, r-l.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Decrease #5:

Move the stitch on peg 5 of the lower board to peg 6 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 6 of the upper board to peg 7 of the upper board.

Knit the stitches on peg 6 of the lower board and peg 7 of the upper board.

Move the stitch on peg 6 of the lower board to peg 7 of the upper board.

Knit the stitch on peg 7 of the upper board.

Cut the working yarn, leaving a yarn tail measuring about 4”.  Using the yarn tail, knit peg 7 of the upper board.  Pull the yarn tail up through the stitch, removing it from the loom.  Pull the yarn tail to tighten and secure this final stitch.  The left curve is now bound off.

Right Curve

Move the stitch from peg 8 on the upper board to peg 9 on the upper board.

Working with 2 strands held together as one, reattach the yarn at the right hand side of the loom, beginning at peg 13 of the lower board.

Work in DZ st, r-l until peg 9 on the upper board has been wrapped and peg 8 on the lower board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on peg 9 of the upper board.)

Decrease #1:

Move the stitch on peg 13 of the lower board to peg 12 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 14 of the upper board to peg 13 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Work in DZ st, r-l until peg 9 on the upper board has been wrapped and peg 8 on the lower board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Decrease #2:

Move the stitch on peg 12 of the lower board to peg 11 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 13 of the upper board to peg 12 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Work in DZ st, r-l until peg 9 on the upper board has been wrapped and peg 8 on the lower board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Decrease #3:

Move the stitch on peg 11 of the lower board to peg 10 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 12 of the upper board to peg 11 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Work in DZ st, r-l until peg 9 on the upper board has been wrapped and peg 8 on the lower board has been wrapped.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.

Decrease #4:

Move the stitch on peg 10 of the lower board to peg 9 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 11 of the upper board to peg 10 of the upper board.

Work in DZ st, l-r.  Knit all pegs with 2 sets of stitches on them.  (Knit 2 stitches over 1 on the end pegs.)

Decrease #5:

Move the stitch on peg 9 of the lower board to peg 8 of the lower board.

Move the stitch on peg 10 of the upper board to peg 9 of the upper board.

Knit the stitches on peg 8 of the lower board and peg 9 of the upper board.

Move the stitch on peg 8 of the lower board to peg 9 of the upper board.

Knit the stitch on peg 9 of the upper board.

Cut the working yarn, leaving a yarn tail measuring about 4”.  Using the yarn tail, knit peg 9 of the upper board.  Pull the yarn tail up through the stitch, removing it from the loom.  Pull the yarn tail to tighten and secure this final stitch.  The right curve is now bound off.

Weave in all yarn ends.

So quick, so fun, make a ton of cotton loves!

Happy

Heart

Day!

 

2 Comments

  • What a darling idea, Jenny! I’m lovin ‘it! I l really love your use of double knit for a wash cloth…I bet it has wonderful squish! :D

  • This is really hard to figure out without some short tutorials. ?

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Feb 5, 2016

‘Back to Basics’ Blanket (double knit)

A GREAT PATTERN FOR BEGINNERS!!  …an introduction to double knit. No matter how fierce the winter gets, this lovely throw will keep you warm and cozy. Designed by Jacquelyn Darragh

blanket_gradient2

Knitting Loom:  28” Knitting Board + extenders set up for double knit at 2 cm spacing

Yarn: Knit Picks Wool of the Andes Superwash Bulky, 100% Superwash Wool. 137 yards per skein. Hand wash in cold water and lay flat to dry. Colors: Camel Heather (Camel), 3 skeins, White, 3 skeins, and Fjord Heather (Blue), 2 skeins

Stitches: Stockinette

Notions: Knit hook, crochet hook

Gauge: 2 stitches X 3 rows = approx. 1 inch

Size: 34 x 50 inches

change_color1

 

Basic Notes: With each color change, cut yarn and knot after tying on the next color. All stitches are Stockinette. Check out chart below.

To keep side edges even and smooth, tie on your new yarns at 2nd stitch between the rows of pegs. This will keep the knots away from the edge and hidden from the finished throw. When cutting each yarn, leave a yarn tail approximately 3” that will lay flat between the 2 rows of pegs.

Cast on row will be the same as one row of stockinette stitch. You start on Left side of loom on top peg #1 with a slip knot; bring yarn down to peg #2 on lower board. Wrap yarn around, and continue back up to peg # 3 on top board. Continue weaving the yarn around every other peg, alternating from one board to the other, to end. Wrap around the end at last peg. Return back to beginning by wrapping all the pegs that were skipped on first pass. Now all the pegs for this project will be wrapped.

Lay a piece of yarn across the stitches with the yarn ends dangling at each end of loom. This is referred to as the anchor yarn or waste yarn. It is usually removed after the knitting is complete. Now, wrap all the pegs again just as before so that you have 2 loops on each peg. You are ready to hook over using the knit hook. This means to lift the bottom loop, on each peg over the top loop, and into the center of the loom. Do this to all pegs, so that they have only one wrap of yarn. Your stitches are now cast on and you are ready to work in stockinette stitch.

The stockinette stitch produces a smooth knit, and is usually the first stitch learned in double knitting. It is the same process as casting on. Once you wrap all pegs again, hook over. This completes one row of stockinette stitch. Continue this stitch with the color changes for the entire afghan.

INSTRUCTIONS

Cast on 64 stitches with Camel yarn in Stockinette stitch. Lay contrasting anchor yarn.

Knit 7 rows in Camel. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 3 rows in Blue. Tie in Camel yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 6 rows in Camel. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 4 rows in Blue. Tie in Camel yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 5 rows in Camel. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 5 rows in Blue. Tie in Camel yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 4 rows in Camel. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 6 rows in Blue. Tie in White yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 3 rows in Camel. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 7 rows in Blue. Tie in White yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 4 rows in White. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 6 rows in Blue. Tie in White yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 5 rows in White. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 5 rows in Blue. Tie in White yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 6 rows in White. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 4 rows in Blue. Tie in White yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 7 rows in White. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 3 rows in Blue. Tie in White yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 8 rows in White. Tie in Blue yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 2 rows in Blue. Tie in White yarn. Cut Blue and knot.

Knit 7 rows in White. Tie in Camel yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 3 rows in Camel. Tie in White yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 6 rows in White. Tie in Camel yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 4 rows in Camel. Tie in White yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 5 rows in White. Tie in Camel yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 5 rows in Camel. Tie in White yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 4 rows in White. Tie in Camel yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 6 rows in Camel. Tie in White yarn.  Cut Camel and knot.

Knit 3 rows in White. Tie in Camel yarn.  Cut White and knot.

Knit 8 rows in Camel.

Bind Off your stitches with a loose crochet bind off.

Bind Off at anchor yarn with loose crochet bind off.

Now that the blanket is complete, finish off with this method. Place blanket in pot or sink with hot water for 4 minutes. Allow yarn to fully soak up all the water. Remove from sink and gently roll in a full size towel or two to absorb as much of the water as possible. Place in your dryer for five minutes on medium heat to fluff and soften the wool. Block to specified size and allow to air dry until fully dry. Enjoy your lovely throw!

backtobasics_chart

 

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Feb 1, 2016

Stitchology 18 : Hugs & Kisses

 

XOXOX, a symbol for hugs and kisses, is a term used for expressing sincerity, faith, love, or good friendship at the end of a written letter, email, or text message.  This practice has been in use clear back into the Middle Ages. Since most of the common people could not read or write, the ‘X’ was placed on documents, and a kiss was placed over it as a show of their sincerity.  The ‘o’ physically resembles a hug, and has joined the ‘X’ near signatures as a perfect pair to express love and friendship.  With Valentine’s Day coming up this month, it’s a perfect time to learn this stitch. :)

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)  To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Hugs & Kisses Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in berries)

Notions: Loom tool, cable needle, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 10 for repeats of the same column, or 20 for repeats of the 2 alternating columns.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap…except in the row before working the cables, as noted below.

The cables in this pattern involve trading the loops of 4 pegs in the correct order.  They are worked as follows:

*Note: It helps to e-wrap the knit stitches that sit right in line with the cable pegs in the row before the cable row to aid the cable stitches in stretching to their new places. Simply untwist the e-wrap loops when creating the cables.

[2/2RC]:  Worked over 4 pegs:

  • Lift the loops from the 2 right pegs of the 4 designated cable pegs and place them on the cable needle.  (*note: this is easy to remember— RC= right pegs first)
  • Move the 2 stitches on the left of the designated cable pegs over 2 pegs to the right.
  • Knit the 2 stitches you’ve just moved.  Place the stitches from the cable needle onto the now empty left pegs and knit them.  Pull out any slack from all 4 sts before moving on.

[2/2LC]: Worked over 4 pegs:

  • Lift the loop from the 2 left pegs of the 4 designated cable pegs and place them on the cable needle.  (*note: this is easy to remember— LC= left peg first)
  • Move the 2 stitches on the right of the designated cable pegs over 2 pegs to the left.
  • Place the stitches from the cable needle onto the now empty right pegs and knit them. Knit the 2 stitches on the left. Pull out any slack from all 4 sts before moving on.

 

Chart-Key-Hugs & Kisses

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

(*Note: Don’t let the abbreviations intimidate you!  It really is easy once you understand how to work each of the cables as described above.  I promise! :)  )

Rows 1 & 2:  p1, k8, p2, k8, p1.

(**Note: if you need extra room to cross those cable stitches, you can read Row 2 (and all rows right before a cable row) as: p1, ew8, p2, ew8, p1. Just make sure to untwist the e-wraps while working the cables.)

Row 3: p1, 2/2RC, 2/2LC, p2, 2/2LC, 2/1RC, p1.

Rows 4-6: rep Row 1.

Row 7: rep Row 3.

Rows 8-10: rep Row 1.

Row 11: p1, 2/2LC, 2/2RC, p2, 2/2RC, 2/1LC, p1.

Rows 12-14: rep Row 1.

Row 15: rep Row 11.

Row 16: rep Row 1.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Hugs n Kisses angle

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 44 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Rows 1-4: k2, p2, k2, p3, k2, [p2, k3, p2, k3] rep between [ ] once, p2, k2, p3, k2, p2, k2.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5:  k2, p1, *k8, p2, rep from * twice more, k8, p1, k2.

Row 6: p3, *k8, p2, rep from * twice more, k8, p3.

hugs n kisses close(**Note: the k8’s can be e-wraps here…see notes above.)

Row 7:  k2, p1, *2/2RC, 2/2LC, p2, 2/2LC, 2/1RC, p2, rep from * to last 3 sts, p1,  k2.

Row 8: rep Row 6.  (**Use regular knits/u-stitches here.)

Row 9: rep Row 5.

Row 10: rep Row 6. (**The k8’s can be e-wraps…see notes above.)

Row 11: rep Row 7.

Rows 12-14: rep Rows 8-10.

Row 15: k2, p1, *2/2LC, 2/2RC, p2, 2/2RC, 2/1LC, p2, rep from * to last 3 sts, p1,  k2.

Rows 16-18: rep Rows 8-10.

Row 19: rep Row 15.

Row 20: rep Row 8.

Row 21-60: Repeat Rows 5-20.

Finishing Rows

Rows 61-64: k2, p2, k2, p3, k2, [p2, k3, p2, k3] rep between [ ] once, p2, k2, p3, k2, p2, k2.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block well to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

1 Comment

  • Wonderful!

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Jan 30, 2016

Very Berry Bonnet

 

Very Berry Bonnet side angle b

 

Designed by Bethany A Dailey

**Edited 2/5/16 to add a note to Rnds 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22.

**Edited 2/10/16 Brim section to correct remaining number of loops on each long side of the loom to 34 (68 total).

A hat to keep you cozy warm with a vibrantly whimsical flair! This design is unique in that it is styled to be worked from the crown down to create those playful points at the ears.

Knitting Loom: All-n-One Loom, 92 pegs used.

Yarn: Approximately 395 yards of worsted weight yarn. Sample used Universal Yarn Classic Shades (1 skein in Campfire used for main color) 197 yds/180 m., and Patons Classic Wool Worsted (1 skein in Plum Heather used for contast color) 210 yds/192 m.

Notions: knitting tool, 6mm crochet hook (for cast on and help with possible missed stitches, etc), stitch markers, scissors, knitting pins, yarn needle, row counter.

Gauge: 13 sts x 33 rows= 4 inches (in pattern, using U-Stitch)

Finished Measurements: Circumference: 20″, Length from crown to middle brim: 10″ (ear points add 3”)

Skills Needed: Knit/U-stitch, Purl, Drawstring CO, Half Hitch CO (or CO of your choice), and Basic BO, braiding and pompom making.

Abbreviations:
CO: cast on
MC: main color
CC: contrast color
Rnd(s): round(s)
Rep: repeat
K: knit stitch/U-stitch
P: purl stitch
KO: knit off
St(s): stitches
WY: working yarn
HHCO: half hitch cast on
S1: slip one/skip one
BO: bind off

Pattern Notes:
This pattern uses 1 strand of yarn held throughout.

For the sample, all knit stitches were made using the U-stitch. Work whichever type of knit stitch helps you achieve the proper gauge.

Drawstring CO tutorial

Half Hitch CO tutorial

Very Berry Bonnet BInstructions

Set loom to work in the round using 68 pegs, which are centered on the loom. Peg #1 should be at a corner (where the slider and long side meet). Using the Main Color, drawstring cast on to 68 pegs.

Rnds 1-6: *k2, p2, rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnds 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22: (*Note: you will be increasing the number of pegs used by 4, at each corner of the pegs currently being used.) HHCO to corner peg just before peg 1 (this will be the new peg #1), k all pegs on 1st long side of loom to 2nd corner, HHCO to next empty peg, k all pegs on slider, HHCO to next empty peg, k all pegs on 2nd long side of loom to 4th corner, HHCO to next empty peg, k all pegs on slider.

Rnds 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 21: knit all, including newly CO pegs. Move sliders gradually outward to accommodate new sts. (After Rnd 22, there will be 92 pegs filled.)

Rnds 23-28: *k2, p2, rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnds 29-34: * p2, k2, rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnds 35-70: rep Rnds 23-34 a total of 3 times.

Prepare to work in a flat panel using only 12 pegs at each end of the loom. (Pegs 4-1, 5 slider pegs, & pegs 92-90 on first end and pegs 39-41, 5 slider pegs, & pegs 47-50.)

Work the first section of 12 pegs, keeping in the same pattern as before, while decreasing at the center with a k2tog every other row. Expect the decreasing to cause there to be 3 knits or 3 purls together at the center occasionally. When there is only one loop left, cut at 10” for seaming and pull through loop. Repeat procedure with the other side’s 12 pegs.

Brim

Very Berry Bonnet flatThere will now be 34 loops remaining on each long side of the loom (68 total). Prepare to CO to work in as a flat panel in the following method:

Using the Contrast Color, and leaving a 10” tail for seaming later, CO to 92 pegs, centering them on the loom so that the beginning CO loop is at the center of the front long side of the loom. Work all the way around the loom and back to the 2nd center peg of the front long side of the loom. The original loops of this front long side of the loom will NOT be worked in the following rows. These pegs are simply being borrowed temporarily— just work the rows while ignoring those bottom loops. Only the back long side original loops will be worked into the row.

Row 1: s1, *p1, k1, rep from * to back long side with previous sts. Work these sts following the same ribbing pattern, but with 2 loops worked as one (the original loops and the newly CO loops). After these 30 sts are worked, continue around the loom to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 2: s1, *k1, p1, rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 3: s1, *p1, k1, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Rows 4-16: rep Rows 2 & 3.

Rows 17-32: rep Rows 2 & 3, but BO the first 2 sts of each row.

Loosely Basic BO remaining 60 sts. Leave a 14” tail for seaming.

Repeat the same Brim Instructions, but CO starting at the center of the BACK long side, working the original loops from the FRONT long side into the first row.

Finishing

Very Berry Bonnet stitching Very Berry Bonnet- stitching braidCinch the Drawstring CO by pulling carefully but firmly on the yarn tail until the sts are as snug as they will go. Pull tail to inside of hat and stitch around circle to close completely. Knot securely.

Using the long tails of the MC, neatly stitch the edges of the brim to the MC points on each side of the hat.

Create 2 braids by wrapping both the MC and the CC around the loom 6 times. Cut the loops at each end. This will provide 2 sections of 12 strands of yarn. Tie each section with an overhand knot at the top. Divide the sections into 3 groups of 4 strands and braid them together until 4” remain unbraided at the bottom. Secure with another overhand knot.

Pinch the top knot of one of the braids between the back side’s brim at the point section. Take the front side’s brim point and wrap around the back side’s to seal the braid inside. Using the long tails of the CC, stitch the braid and corner flaps securely in place, keeping edges even and tidy. Repeat on the other side. A few hidden stitches can be tucked into the back brim to keep it folded upwards.

Create three pompoms using both the MC and the CC yarns. Secure onto place at the top of the hat, and at the ends of each braid. The overhand knot at the bottom of the braid serves as a place to tie the pompoms to so that they have a better hold.

Weave in all ends and block lightly as desired.

To leave a question or comment for Bethany Dailey, simply add your comments to the section below! :)

8 Comments

  • Can’t wait to get started on this! We are supposed to get up to 14 inches of snow today and tomorrow so I got some great yarn to use! I’m sure I’ll have tons of questions but it looks like an awesome pattern. Thanks!

  • Wow! This bonnet is the perfect project for 14 inches of snow! :D I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, no worries. ;)

    Have fun, Lisa…both with the snow *and* the looming!

  • OK, I’ve done CO and first 6 rows. Struggling with 7. HHCO to just before peg 1 does that mean go all the way around using HHCO? I’m working counterclockwise so maybe that makes a difference?do I need to start over and work clockwise? Told you I would need help! Thanks!

  • Yes, this row was a tad tricky to explain. All you are doing is adding 4 extra pegs, located at each corner of the pegs you are currently using.

    So, in answer to your question…no, you don’t CO all the way around the loom…just *add* the corner peg next to peg #1 before working your way to the next corner peg in line, going the same direction as you have been the whole time. You will then add a peg here too (at the 2nd corner)…and so on, for a total of 4 added pegs, each of these with a HHCO loop. Is that better? :)

  • Thank you! It makes total sense now and I’m on row 12!

  • Yay! Look at you go! :D

    Thank you for your question, as it helped me to know how to word it better. Good feedback is priceless! :)

  • Love the pattern but I must be missing something. After I finished with the first color and am starting the brim I somehow have 34 loops on each side and not 30. Could you please explain what I am doing wrong.

    Thanks!

  • Hi Kristen! :)

    You are exactly correct. Good catch! I have updated the pattern accordingly. Thank you so much for letting me know.

    I can’t wait to see your bonnet when it’s all done! :D

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Jan 23, 2016

Tweed Beanie

Tweed Beanie Logo

 

 Knitting loom:

All-n-One knitting loom, 80 (88, 96) pegs. 

Yarn: Approx 140-164 yds of worsted weight of merino wool and Donegal tweed blend.  City Tweed in Brocade  was used in sample. 

Notions: Knitting tool, tapestry needle, cable needle. 

Gauge: 11sts x 13 rows = 2 inches.

Size: Three sizes provided, due to the shrinkage in the fabric from the cables, a higher than normal number of pegs is required. Small (fits head circumference up to 19”), Medium (fits head circumference up to 20”), Large (fits a head circumference up to 21”). 

Abbreviations2016-01-24 08.10.56
Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

k2tog=knit two stitches together

p2tog=purl two stitches together

c4f=Cable 4 stitches front

c4b=Cable 4 stitches back

c4f: Cable 4 Front (also known as 4-st LC)

Step 1: Take working yarn behind pegs 1 and 2 (you are skipping pegs 1 and 2).

Step 2: Knit pegs 3 and 4, transfer these stitches to cable needle.

Step 3: Take working yarn to the front of peg 1: knit pegs 1 and 2.

Step 4: Transfer the stitches as follows: stitch from peg 2 to peg 4, stitch from peg 1 to peg 3.

Step 5: Transfer the stitches from the cable needle and place them on pegs 1 and 2.

With your knitting tool, gently, pull on the stitches to pull out any slack of yarn and tighten the stitches.

c4b: Cable 4 Back (also known as 4-st RC)

Step 1: Place stitches from pegs 1 and 2 onto cable needle and hold to the center of the loom.

Step 2: Bring yarn in front of peg 3, knit pegs 3 and 4.

Step 3: Transfer the stitches just worked as follows: Stitch from peg 3 to peg 1, stitch from peg 4 to peg 2.

Step 4: Transfer stitches from cable needle to pegs 3 and 4. Knit pegs 3 and 4.

With your knitting tool, gently, pull on the stitches to pull out any slack of yarn and tighten the stitches.

INSTRUCTIONS2016-01-24 08.05.00

Set knitting loom to the desired number of pegs 80 (88, 96) pegs.

CO 80 (88, 96) sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1-Rnd 10: *k2, p2; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 11: *k6, p2; rep from * to the end of rnd.

Rnd 12: *k2, c4f, p2; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 13: *k6, p2; rep from * to the end of rnd.

Rnd 14: *c4b, k2, p2; rep from * to the end rnd.

Rep Rnds 11-Rnd 14: until hat measures approx 7 (7.5, 8) inches from cast on edge.

Next rnd: Remove the stitches off the pegs and place them on a piece of scrap yarn. Re-set knitting loom to the following peg configuration 40 (44, 48). Place stitches back on the knitting loom, 2 loops per peg. Work the row as follows: *k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, p2tog; rep from * to the end of rnd.

Next rnd: k to the end of rnd.

Bind off with gather removal method. Weave ends in. Block lightly.

 

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Jan 18, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Yarn Is The Best Value?

10940466_663261290449770_6723370072072730651_n

 

 

 

 

 

Money has been on my mind lately.  Or rather the lack of it in my life.  I know I am not alone in that.  What with the Powerball jackpot at a record high, the U.S. 1894-S Barber dime selling for almost $2 million, and bills needing to be paid, it’s not a wonder that money is always on everyone’s minds.

Unfortunately, the love of all our lives is not free.  No…  Not talking about Adam Levine or Idris Elba.  Yarn.  Yes.  Yarn.  THAT love of our lives.  How do we know we are getting a great deal if it’s not on clearance?

You have a pattern you want to make.  Don’t want to buy the yarn used in the pattern because it cost way too much.  You are on a yarn budget.  Oh the horror!  Oh!  Here is a yarn that is rather inexpensive per skein/ball!  Wait…  It doesn’t have as much yardage as this other that cost more.  Hmmm…  How do you know that you are getting the best deal with your money?  On just hold on a minute…  Was math just mentioned?  Well not yet technically.  But yes.  It’s math lesson #3.  Now I have mentioned it.

For all of you who claim you have yet to use algebra as an adult, you are wrong again.  Here is more algebra all explained step by step to help you compare yarn prices so you too can get the best deal for that next project.

Yarn selections:

Here are 2 examples of yarn for your next project.

Let’s say the project needs 1100 yards of yarn.

First selection of yarn cost $6.99 per ball and has 150 yards per ball.

Second selection of yarn cost $12.99 (WHOA!) and has 400 yards per ball.

Let’s see which is cheaper for this project.

How do I compare yarn by price per yard?

You only need 3 things to calculate this.  The price of the yarn and the number of yards/meters in the ball.  Yes that’s just 2.  The 3rd thing is the calculator.  Lucky calculators are included on smart phones.  Or you can download one.  Hang on to that calculator.  You will need it later…

All you do is divide the price by the number of yards.  Huh?  Ok, I will break it down for you.

Each letter will represent something.

A = the price of the ball of yarn

B = number of yards or meters in the ball

C = the answer

The equation is as follows:

A / B = C

What does / mean?

/ is the symbol used for divide.

Example:  Lets calculate using the first yarn which cost $6.99 and has 150 yards.  How much is the yarn per yard?

A = the price or 6.99

B = number of yards or 150

Let’s put those numbers into our equation.

6.99 / 150 = .0466

This yarn costs $0.05 per yard.

But the second selection of yarn cost $12.99 but has 400 yards.  Is it cheaper than the first we calculated?  Let’s see.

A = 12.99

B = 400

Using the equation above

12.99 / 400 = .0324

The second yarn cost $0.03 per yard.

The second yarn is cheaper per yard than the first.  Therefore you will need to buy less of the second than the first.

How many balls do I need to buy?

Going by the example, the pattern calls for 1100 yards.  You will just need to divide the amount of yarn needed by the number of yards in the ball.  For this equation, we will use

D = number of yards needed for the pattern

E = number of yards in the ball of yarn you will use

F = number of balls of yarn needed

Now for the equation

D / E = F

Same equation.  Different numbers for a different answer.

Let’s do both examples from before.

The first had 150 yards per ball.

D = number of yards needed or 1100

E = number yards in ball or 150

1100 / 150 = 7.33

Since the answer is over 7, you will need to buy 8 balls in order to have enough.

For the second, it has 400 yards

D = 1100

E = 400

1100 / 400 = 2.75

So you will need to buy only 3 balls of the second yarn.

Which is the better deal?

I suspect you already know which is the better deal, but let’s discuss why.

To see how much total you spend, you will just multiple the cost of the ball by the number of balls.

G = cost per ball

H = number of balls

J = total cost of the yarn for the project

The equation (x means to multiply)

G x H = J

For the first yarn,

G = 6.99 cost per ball

H = 8 balls needed

6.99 x 8 = 55.92

The first yarn will cost you $55.92 for this project.

Now for the second yarn.

G = 12.99

H = 3

12.99 x 3 = 38.97

The second yarn will cost you a total of $38.97.

Wait…  What??

Even though the first yarn was cheaper per ball, the second yarn is the cheaper for the entire project.  You will save $16.97 by buying the more expensive yarn.

What have we learned from this little lesson other than math is still confusing and what on earth did she mean by that??  Hopefully we have learned that just because some yarns cost more than others, we save money by buying the more expensive yarn because it has more yards.  Some don’t.  Some do.  Just be sure to check that label for the yardage before ignoring a pricier yarn.  And never leave your calculator at home!

Never have an empty loom and Happy Knitting!!

3 Comments

  • Thank you for this information! Most of us need some helpful tips!

  • Thank you for the formulas or is that formulae? I forgot my Latin too.

  • Not all costs of WOOL yarn can be calculated simply with math. I own sheep and in no way can I compete with cheap overseas yarn, I’m not talking about the quality of the yarn, but the costs to produce it. I raise and shear my sheep humanely, the hay farmer and shearer make a living wage, and the environment is not negatively impacted. So, my yarn costs twice that from Peru etc. Not complaining (well maybe a little) just trying to shed a little light on the issue. Dye dumped in rivers, shearers that can’t feed their children, and sheep that are mishandled produce wool for 5 bucks a skein.

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Jan 15, 2016

Winter Dawn Beanie

Winter Dawn Beanie Model 2

Winter dawn skies are spectacular to behold with deep blues and the hint of sunshine rays peeking through giving the sky a wonderful purple hue. 

At the start of 2016, our focus is going to be in simple, beginner patterns. These patterns will evolve into more intermediate level by the middle of the year, then tackling some advanced patterns by the end of the year.

Knitting loom: Hat loom, set at large gauge, 40 pegs.

Yarn: Approx 75 yds of super bulky merino wool. Malabrigo Rasta in Abril was used in sample.

Notions: Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

Gauge: 4sts x 10 rows = 2 inches

Size: Fits adult female | head circumference up to 21″

Abbreviations

Approx=approximately

K=knit stitch

P=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

Rnd(s)=Round(s)

INSTRUCTIONS

Set knitting loom, to large gauge at 40 pegs.

Cast on 40 sts, prepare to work in the round.

Rnd 1-Rnd 6: *k2, p2; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 7: *k1, p1; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 8: *p1, k1; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rep Rnds 7 and 8: until item measures 7.5 inches from cast on edge (approx 30 rnds).

Next rnd: Move the loop from every “even” peg to its neighbor “odd” peg (from 4 to 3, from 2 to 1, etc). k to the end of rnd.

Bind off with gather removal method.

Weave ends in. Block lightly.

 

Winter Dawn Beanie 2

5 Comments

  • Such a cute hat! I love the texture. I can’t wait to see what patterns you have in store for us the rest of the year. I just got my All-n-One and I can’t wait to use it.

  • Ditto to Colleen Shuman….
    Thank you so much for all your work Isella ,, this pattern is really cute ! <3

  • So, I am new to loom knitting ( I knit with needles). So, if I am going to purchase 1 loom for these upcoming projects, which one would be the most versatile?

  • Thank you!

  • Thank you!

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Jan 11, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Luminescence

January slinks along, dragging her cold, gray days along like a dreary cloak- blanketing everything in ashen shades.  She dulls the sun and frosts the air with ice.  Ah, but a closer look yields a secret beauty.  A faint shimmer here, a glittering dusting there – luminescence!  Capture a bit of this luminous beauty with this double knit wreath project.

IMG_3362

Knitting Loom: KB 32 peg loom

Yarn: 130 yards of Buttercream Alpaca Solid in Gray.

80” of a worsted weight yarn in a similar color.

Notions: knitting tool, yarn needle, scissors, glue gun and glue.

Additional Materials: 16” Floracraft Foam Wreath

9 yards of 1 ½ inch wide sheer ribbon in silver (Offray Aria was used for the sample)

1 focal piece/item (6” Silver Satin Bird Clip by Touch of Nature was used for the sample)

any additional embellishments desired (2 Victoria Lynn Pearl Rhinestone Accent Picks were used for the sample)

Gauge: Not essential for this project.

Size: approximately 16” in diameter

Abbreviations:

HS st – Half Stockinette Stitch

l – left

r – right

Techniques

Modified Figure 8 Cast-On:  Starting on the left side, place a slip knot on the first peg of the lower board.  Bring the working yarn up to the second peg on the upper board.  Wrap the peg in a counterclockwise direction.

IMG_3341 (800x406)

Take the working yarn down to the third peg on the lower board.  Wrap the peg in a clockwise direction.

IMG_3342 (800x412)

Take the working yarn up to the fourth peg on the upper board.  Wrap the peg in a counterclockwise direction.

IMG_3343 (800x403)

Continue working in this manner until the desired number of peg pairs (stitches) have been wrapped.

IMG_3344 (800x405)

Complete the cast on by wrapping the knitting board in HS st, r-l.  Knit the pegs that have 2 wraps on them.  (This counts as row 1 for this project).

 

          Half Stockinette Stitch:  The Half Stockinette Stitch (HS st) is worked on both sides of the knitting board/loom.  The wraps will travel at a slight slant.  One peg is skipped between each wrap.  These skipped pegs will remain empty while working in HS st.  Also, in this stitch pattern, one peg at the beginning of each row will serve as a sort of turning peg and will not be wrapped.  When working from left to right, the turning peg is the first peg on the lower board.  When working from right to left, the turning peg is the last wrapped peg on the upper board.

 

Wrapping in HS st, r-l:  (Working yarn will be at the last wrapped peg on the upper board).  Take the working yarn down to the lower board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Take the working yarn back to the upper board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Continue working in this manner until all the pegs have a second wrap on them, except the turning peg.  Knit the pegs that have two wraps on them.

IMG_3345 (800x438)

 

Wrapping in HS st, l-r:  (Working yarn will be at the first wrapped peg on the lower board).  Take the working yarn to the upper board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Take the working yarn back down to the lower board and around the nearest wrapped peg.  Continue working in this manner until all pegs have a second wrap on them, except the turning peg.  Knit the pegs that have two wraps on them.

IMG_3346 (800x430)

Work back and forth across the board in HS st until the knitted fabric reaches the desired length, or as directed in the pattern.

 

          Bind Off:  Working yarn should be at the right hand side of the knitting board/loom.  Pick up the stitch on peg 1 of the lower board and move it backward to peg 2 of the upper board, above the stitch on this peg.  With the knitting tool, pull the lower stitch up through the upper stitch and off of the peg.  (This peg will now be empty.)

Move the stitch forward to peg 3 of the lower board, above the stitch on this peg.  With the knitting tool, pull the lower stitch up through the upper stitch and off of the peg.

Move the stitch backward to peg 4 of the upper board.  With the knitting tool, pull the lower stitch up through the upper stitch and off of the peg.

Move the stitch forward to peg 5 of the lower board.  With the knitting tool, pull the lower stitch up through the upper stitch and off of the peg.

Continue working back and forth across the knitting board until the last peg has two stitches on it.  Pull the lower stitch up through the upper stitch and off of the peg.  Replace this stitch on the peg and gently pull on the working yarn to ease out any excess slack.

Cut the working yarn, leaving a 5” length.  With the knitting tool, pull the yarn tail up through the last stitch.  Remove the stitch from the peg and gently pull the yarn tail to tighten and secure the last bound stitch. 

Instructions

Knitted Wreath Covering:

Cast on 7 pairs of pegs using the modified figure 8 cast on method.

Row 1:  Work in HS st, l-r.

Row 2:  Work in HS st, r-l.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until knitted piece measures 50.5 inches in length.  Bind off.  Weave in all yarn ends.

 

Assembly:

Thread the yarn needle with the worsted weight yarn.  Lay the wreath form down on a flat surface and slip the knitted wreath covering underneath the wreath

IMG_3348 (800x600)

Wrap the knitted wreath covering around the wreath form and begin sewing it in place.  (This will be the back of the wreath, so any seaming method will work.)

IMG_3350 (600x800)

Continue working around the entire wreath, wrapping and seaming the knitted wreath cover in place.  Once the entire wreath has been covered, take a moment to straighten the knitted wreath cover, then seam the ends together.

IMG_3352 (600x800)

Once the ends have been seamed together, weave in the yarn ends and get ready to have a little fun embellishing!

 

Decorate!

Plug in the glue gun so it will be warming up.  Cut two pieces of ribbon:  a 10” length and an 18” length.  Glue one end of the 18” length to the back of the wreath, covering the joining seam of the knitted wreath cover.

IMG_3353 (800x600)

Take the 10” length of ribbon and glue the ends together, creating a loop.

IMG_3354 (800x600)

Feed the 18” length of ribbon through the loop that was just created, then wrap it around the top of the wreath and glue in place on the back of the wreath.

IMG_3355 (600x800)

With the remaining ribbon, create a bow and glue it to the ribbon wrapped at the top center of the wreath.

IMG_3356 (800x600)

Add a focal piece, if desired.

IMG_3359 (800x600)

Add additional embellishments, if desired (ie – floral pins, floral picks, beads, buttons, feathers, twine, ribbon, flowers, etc)

IMG_3360 (600x800)

 

Now, go find the perfect spot to hang your beautiful wreath!

IMG_3369

(ps – not in love with the monochromatic look?  Try this project using your favorite colors)

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Jan 4, 2016

Stitchology 17 : Triple Slip Rib

Designed by Bethany Dailey

Triple Slip Rib side angle

Now that the holidays have passed and all the rush and hurry is behind us, it’s time to work up a stitch on our looms that doesn’t take too much thinking or tricky finger-work to accomplish.  This stitch pattern is just the ticket!  It is a simple 8 row repeat and once you get the hang of them, they can be worked entirely from memory.  The long alternating dashes resemble a nice rustic weave, and results in a fairly thick and sturdy panel.  It would be a perfect stitch for a cowl or scarf, or even an entire blanket!

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure. My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square. As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you? You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Triple Slip Rib Square

Triple Slip Rib Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge. The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in mochi)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors. (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 6—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows. The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

A SWYF in the pattern denotes that this peg will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg.  This stitch pattern will do this in groups of three stitches at a time.

*Note: another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Triple Slip Rib StitchTriple Slip Rib close

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:
Rows 1 & 2: p1, k1, p2, k1, p1.
Row 3: SWYF-3, p1, k1, p1.
Row 4: p1, k1, p1, WYIF-3.
Rows 5 & 6: repeat Row 1.
Row 7: repeat Row 4.
Row 8: repeat Row 3.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Triple Slip Rib Square

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart. Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing! For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 39 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p39.
Row 2: k39.
Row 3: p39.
Row 4: k39.

Triple Slip Rib front angleMain Pattern Rows

Row 5: p2, *p2, k1, repeat form * to last 4 sts, p4.
Row 6: k2, *p2, k1, repeat from * to last st, k1.
Row 7: p3, *SWYF-3, p1, k1, p1, repeat from * to last 6 sts, SWYF-3, p3.
Row 8: k2, p1, *SWYF-3, p1, k1, p1, repeat from * to last 6 sts, SWYF-3, p1, k2.
Row 9 & 10: repeat Rows 5 & 6.
Row 11: p4, k1, p1, *SWYF-3, p1, k1, p1, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p3.
Row 12: k2, p2, k1, p1, *SWYF-3, p1, k1, p1, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p1, k2.
Rows 13-60: repeat Rows 5-12 6 more times.
Row 61 & 62: repeat Rows 5 & 6.

Finishing Rows

Row 63: p39.
Row 64: k39.
Row 65: p39.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off) Weave in ends and trim close to work.
Block well to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares. We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket. Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as
necessary:

• Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
• Children: 42″ x 48″
• Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
• Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
• Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

9 Comments

  • Please we want videos because im biggener

  • Hello Eman :) I’m so glad you’ve joined the wonderful world of loom knitting! We are working on developing video tutorials on some of these stitches. A few of them have been completed and are located at the regular website here: http://knittingboard.com/

    But, let’s see if we can’t get you going on this stitch in the meantime. It is really quite a simple square, I promise! When you are reading the pattern instructions for the square, what exactly is it that you don’t understand so I can help you better??

    Thanks!
    Bethany ~

  • Looks like you can also find the stitch videos on KB’S YouTube Channel here:
    https://www.youtube.com/user/knittingboard/videos

  • Hi Bethany,

    thank you for your great work every month, it’s really appreciated! One question please, would this stitch pattern curl if the border is not used? I would like to use it on an infinity scarf but I am not fond of the border.

    Thanks
    Brunella

  • Oh, thank you so much, Brunella! I appreciate the appreciation, lol! :D

    I believe that since this pattern combines knits and purls fairly evenly, it will lay pretty flat even without the border. It felt nice and sturdy while knitting it up, so I’m pretty sure you’ll be fine. The backside looks like a simple 2 x 1 ribbing, so it would be fine seeing it from both sides as well.

    I’d love to see your scarf when it’s all done! :D
    Bethany~

  • thank you for your reply! I am planning to start shortly.. as soon as I finish at least one WIP!

  • Bethany, I thank you very much for all of the wonderful patterns you create and share with us. I am using the All-in-One Loom to make the Stitchology Squares ( I am so excited to try each and every one, just beautiful!!!). But, I am following the directions, use the cast on you suggest, true knit and purl stitches and a #4 worsted weight yarn. My squares are wider than yours but not 8 inches high so turn out more like a rectangle shape. What am I doing wrong? Sure would appreciate your ideas.

    Thank you,
    Marilyn

  • Hi Marilyn! :) I’m so excited to hear you’ve been following along and making squares with us! The more the merrier, right?? :D

    As for the square not coming out even, blocking really helps with this. If you are using a wool, or a mostly wool blend, blocking should be a snap. The process helps train those fibers to reset into the shape you desire. I like to use a foam pad onto which I have marked an 8 x 8 inch square with a permanent marker…this makes it so easy to stretch the wet square to the proper size.

    Now, if you are consistently on every square coming up short, you may just need to add a couple border garter rows on both the top and bottom. Or if you need to do another repeat of the pattern itself, that would be fine too. Everybody knits at varying gauges, so this may just be something you need to address with added rows. Or…you could add enough rows to make your squares actually squares, then block to a bigger measurement so that they will all be the same, just larger than the original 8 x 8. That’s totally acceptable either way! :)

    I hope this helps you…Happy stitching!

  • Thank you! Those are wonderful suggestions as I plan to make an afghan using all of your different square patterns and I feel so much better knowing there is a way to “remedy” the size/shape of the way mine are turning out. I really appreciate your help Bethany.

    Marilyn

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Dec 25, 2015

Loom Knitting Advent – Mister Quinzee

Loom Knitting Advent, day 25 brings you one last loom knitting surprise: Mister Quinzee, a fun little ‘snowman’ with a hollow core, perfect for storing a little bit of holly-jolly!

Designed by Jenny Stark

Day-25-300x300

Mister Quinzee

A quinzee is a simple shelter made by hollowing out a pile of settled snow.  It is simpler than an igloo, yet it is an effective way to stay warm if you are out in the winter elements for very long.  The instructions for this project won’t help you create a winter shelter, but they will help you create an adorable snowman with a hollow ‘shelter’ for your favorite goodies or trinkets.

IMG_3327 (772x1024)

Knitting Loom: Hat Loom

Yarn: Hat: Red Heart Stellar in Celestial.

Head: Bernat Baby Blanket in White.

Notions: knitting tool, tapestry needle with large eye, scissors, 4” x 4” round paper mache box with lid, LaMode button set #2010, glue gun and hot glue, pencil, blush (optional).

Size: Approximately 7″ tall (excluding pom-pom)

Gauge: Not essential for this project.

Abbreviations:

K = knit stitch

P = purl stitch

Techniques

Double E-wrap Cast-On:  Wrap the first peg twice.  With the knitting tool, pull the lower wrap past the upper wrap and over the top of the peg.  Repeat this process for each of the remaining pegs.  Cast on is now complete.  Continue on as directed in the pattern.

U-wrap Knit Stitch:  Bring the working yarn in front of the peg to be worked, above the existing stitch on the peg.  Bend the working yarn around the peg, creating a u shaped wrap. Knit the lower stitch over the u wrap.

Basic Bind Off:  Knit the first two pegs.  Move the stitch from the second peg over to the first peg.  Knit the lower stitch over the upper stitch.  One stitch has now been bound off. Move the stitch from peg 1 to the empty peg.  This is now peg 1.  Knit the next stitch.  Move the stitch that was just knit over to the first peg.  Knit the lower stitch over the upper stitch.  Continue working in this manner until there is one stitch left. Cut the working yarn, leaving a yarn tail that is at least 4” long.  Wrap the yarn tail around the last peg.  Knit the last stitch over the yarn tail and pull the yarn tail out through the stitch.  Bind off is now complete.

Gathered Bind Off:  Loosely wrap the working yarn in a circle around all of the pegs that have stitches – two times.  This will ensure that the yarn tail is long enough to complete the bind off.  Cut the working yarn, then unwrap the long yarn tail from around the pegs.  Lay the yarn tail below the stitch on peg 1.  Using the knitting tool, pull the yarn tail up through the stitch.  *Lay the yarn tail below the next stitch.  Using the knitting tool, pull the yarn tail up through the stitch.  Repeat from * for all stitches on the loom.  Once all stitches have been bound, remove the knitting from the loom.  Pull on the yarn tail to cinch the opening closed (unless otherwise directed by the pattern being worked).  Bind off is now complete.

Pom-pom:  Lay the yarn across the palm of your hand.  Wrap the yarn around the hand about 20-25 times.  Slide the wraps off of the hand, keeping them pinched together at the center.  Take a separate length of yarn and tie it very tightly around the center of the pom-pom.  Knot it securely.  With scissors, cut the loops at each end of the pom-pom.  Be careful not to cut the center strand that holds the pom-pom together.  Fluff the pom-pom and trim any longer strands, if needed.  Use the yarn ends from the center tie to attach the pom-pom to the project.

Instructions

Loom Set up:

For this project, you will need

  • Two 25 peg rounded loom pieces
  • Two 3 peg connectors
  • 28 pegs

Combine the rounded loom pieces with the connectors to create an oval loom.  Place the pegs in the loom, skipping every other hole.  The loom is now set up to knit in large gauge, in the round.  It should look like this:

IMG_3315 (800x523)

This set up is used throughout the project.  You are now ready to begin knitting.

Hat:

With the Red Heart Stellar, cast on 28 stitches using the double e-wrap cast on method.

Rounds 1-8:  K2, P2 to the end of the round.

Rounds 9-35:  K to the end of the round.

Remove the hat from the loom using the gathered bind off method.  If desired, create a pom-pom and attach it to the top of the hat.  Weave in all yarn ends.  Set hat aside for now.

Head:

With the Bernat Baby Blanket, cast on 28 stitches using the double e-wrap cast on method.

 Rounds 1-20:  K to the end of the round.

Remove the head from the loom using the basic bind off method.  Weave in all yarn ends.  Set head aside for now.

Finishing:

Plug in the hot glue gun and let it warm up.  Pick up the round paper mache box.  With the lid on the box, use the pencil to trace a line around the perimeter of the container, just below the lip of the lid.

IMG_3316 (600x800)

Remove the lid from the box and set it aside for a moment.  Slip the knitted head piece onto the box, like a sleeve, lining the bind off edge up with the pencil line on the container.

IMG_3317 (653x800)

Using the hot glue gun, carefully glue the bind off edge of the knitted head sleeve to the paper mache box.

Next, wrap the cast on edge of the knitted head sleeve down around the bottom of the container, gluing it in place with the glue gun.

IMG_3320 (742x800)

Remove the button set from its packaging and glue the buttons to the front of the container.  (I started with the carrot/nose, then added the button eyes above it.)

IMG_3322 (936x1024)

Add blush to Mister Quinzee’s face, if desired.

Fill the paper mache box up with some sort of wonderful, then place the lid back on the container.  Slip the knitted hat on over the lid and pull it down until it rests just above Mister Quinzee’s eyes.  So cute!

Wishing much warmth and happiness to each of you this Winter!

4 Comments

  • I would like to give a a great big applaud to all the designers of this 25 day advent calendar patterns Fantastic job on all the selections used in this project.

  • What a cutie, Jenny!! That face is simply adorable!

  • I’m going through pattern withdrawal! I loved the advent patterns!!! Thank you for providing them!!!!!!!

  • I just wanted to say what a cute pattern and idea to make where you can place homemade cookies or fudge,candies to gift to friends they can eat th goodies then after finished they can use the knitted container for decoration to set out every Christmas and you could use the container and knitted holiday slevees and make like a pumpkin or Turkery , easter bunny, valetine , fourth of July or a birthday cake sleeves for all the different holidays just use our imaginations this would be a awesome gift to share with friends and family love the 25 days of Advent calendar knitted patterns Thank you to all of you came up with all these great knitted patterns .

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