Jun 19, 2016

Happy Feet for Dad

 

Worked in luxurious Malabrigo merino wool… offer both comfort and warmth!

socks_mens

LOOM:  Sock Loom 2 (48 pegs)

YARN:  Approx 320 yds of worsted weight of merino wool. Malabrigo Arroyo in Azules was used in sample. If knitting a larger size, you will need approx 400 yrds.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

GAUGE: 11 sts x 16 rows = 2 inches in stockinette.

SIZE:  Sample shows a size 9 men’s. To make larger size, work the foot of the sock longer (about 1.5”) shorter than desired length, then work the toe.  

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

INSTRUCTIONS

Set knitting loom to 48 pegs.Happy Feet close up

CO 48 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1-Rnd 64 (approx. 8” from CO edge): *k3, p2, k1, p2: rep from * to end.

Rnd 64-80: k to end of rnd.

Heel

The heel is a short-row heel over the first 24 stitches (takes place from peg 1 to peg 24).

New to short-row heels: directions for Short-row heel instructions can be found at the end of pattern.

If familiar with a short-row heel, simply follow the Heel and Toe Part I, decrease until there are 12 pegs unwrapped. Then follow Heel and Toe Part 2, increase back to a full 24 pegs.

Foot

Next rnd: k to end of rnd.

Rep last rnd until foot measures approx. 8.75 from heel (or 1.5” less than desired length).

Toe

Repeat the same steps that you used to turn the heel, making sure to use the same pegs and side of the loom as before.

Remove stitches 1-24 from the loom and place them on one of the double pointed needles. Remove remaining 24 stitches (pegs 25-48) and place them on second double pointed needle. Graft edges to close the toe, using the Kitchener Stitch (see tutorial included in this post). 

Weave ends in. Block lightly.


 

Heel Instructions

 The short-row heel for this sock is worked over 24 pegs (pegs 1-24).

  • Knit from peg 1-23. W&T peg 24
  • Knit from peg 23-2. W&T peg 1
  • Knit from peg 2-22. W&T peg 23
  • Knit from peg 22-3. W&T peg 2
  • Knit from peg 3-21. W&T peg 22
  • Knit from peg 21-4. W&T peg 3
  • Knit from peg 4-20. W&T peg 21
  • Knit from peg 20-5. W&T peg 4
  • Knit from peg 5-19. W&T peg 20
  • Knit from peg 19-6. W&T peg 5
  • Knit from peg 6-18. W&T peg 19
  • Knit from peg 18-7. W&T peg 6
  • Knit from peg 7-19 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 20
  • Knit from peg 19-6 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 5 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 6-20(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 21 (two wraps and the stitch)
  • Knit from peg 20-5 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 4 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 5-21 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 22 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 21-4 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 3 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 4-22(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 23 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 22-3 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 2 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 3-23(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop) . W&T peg 24 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 23-2 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 1 (two wraps and a stitch).

Pegs 1 and 24 have the wraps and the stitch. On the first round for the foot, work the wraps and the stitch together as a regular stitch.

On toe, leave the wraps there and continue to grafting the toes with the Kitchener stitch.

 

 

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Jun 13, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Basic Socks for 18″ Dolls

Whimsical Loom Knits – June 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

IMG_3565

With less than 40 yards of sock yarn, and a few spare hours, you can knit these sweet little socks for 18″ dolls.  

Knitting Loom: KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Approximately 35 yds of a light fingering weight yarn.  Footsie (in Punky), by Knit Fit Knitting, was used for this project.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, 2 double point knitting needles (size 2)

Gauge: 6 stitches and 10 rows = 1″

 

Special Techniques:

w&t:  Wrap and Turn

At the peg indicated in the pattern, using the knitting tool, lift the stitch(es) already in place up off of the peg and hold it(them) temporarily.  Pass the working yarn behind the peg and then across the front of the peg.  Place the held stitch(es) back on the peg, above the wrap that was just created. Wrap and turn is now complete.

 

Instructions

IMG_3568

(Make 2)

Cast on 24 pegs.  Prepare to work in the round.

 

Cuff:

Rounds 1 – 4:  K2, P2 to end of the round.

 

Leg:

Rounds 5 – 16:  Knit to the end of the round.

 

*Short row shaping:

K pegs 1 – 11, w&t peg 12.

K pegs 11 – 2, w&t peg 1.

K pegs 2 – 10, w&t peg 11.

K pegs 10 – 3, w&t peg 2.

K pegs 3 – 9, w&t peg 10.

K pegs 9 – 4, w&t peg 3.

K pegs 4 – 8, w&t peg 9.

K pegs 8 – 5, w&t peg 4.

(Note: For the following rows, when knitting a peg with more than 1 stitch on it, knit all stitches over together, as if they are one stitch.)

K pegs 5 – 9, w&t peg 10.

K pegs 9 – 4, w&t peg 3.

K pegs 4 – 10, w&t peg 11.

K pegs 10 – 3, w&t peg 2.

K pegs 3 – 11, w&t peg 12.

K pegs 11 – 2, w&t peg 1.

K pegs 2 – 24.

(Short row shaping is now complete.)

 

Foot:

Next 6 rounds:  Knit to the end of the round.

(Note: For the first round of this section, at peg 1, knit all stitches over together, as if they are one stitch.)

 

Toe:

Repeat the entire short row shaping section.

Next round:  Knit to the end of the round.

(Note: At peg 1, knit all stitches over together, as if they are one stitch.)

 

Finishing:

Place the stitches from pegs 12 – 1 on a double point knitting needle.  Place the stitches from 13 – 24 on another double point knitting needle.  Use kitchener stitch to close the toe.  Weave in all yarn ends.

Block, if desired.

IMG_3566

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  • Is there a printable version of this pattern. It looks so cute I would like to try it for my grandsons doll. Thank you. Wilma

  • Thank you for your kind comment, Wilma. I am sorry for the delayed reply. At the bottom of each post, you should see a little printer icon. If you click on the icon, it will load a printer friendly version of the post for you. For your convenience, I’m including a link to the printer friendly version of this post for you. You can find it here:

    http://www.printfriendly.com/print?url_s=uGGC%25dN%25cS%25cSoyBtmxAvGGvAtoBnEqmpBz%25cSnEpuvIrF%25cSfijd

    I hope that helps. Have a great weekend!

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Jun 12, 2016

Crescent Socks

Summer is here and with it means it is time to have some easy-to-carry projects like socks! Like waterfalls dripping down the rocks, the Crescent socks have a fluid stitch pattern that drips gently down to the toe of the sock. Worked in a self striping yarn that give them a summer feel. 

Crescent-Socks-1024x897

LOOM:  Sock Loom EFG (shown at 60 pegs).

YARN:  Approx 350 yds of sock weight of superwash merino wool.  Vesper Sock Yarn, self-striping in Pink Sorbet was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, 2 double pointed needles in size 1 or 2 (used to Kitchener the toe).

GAUGE: 15 sts x 19 rows= 2” in stockinette.

SIZE:  Shown in size 7.5 women. To create a larger size, simply work the foot section to 1.5 inches of desired length, then follow the toe instructions.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

SSK=Slip, slip, knit

YO=Yarn over (ewrap the empty peg)

w&t=wrap and turn (remove loop from the peg and hold it, with working yarn, wrap the peg from the inside of the loom to the outside). You will then knit in the opposite direction.

Rnd(s)=round(s)

Tips:

  • I recommend to move all the stitches to their new positions before working (knitting) the round.
  • To make the socks match as closely as possible, work one sock normally and once you are to begin the second sock, locate the spot on the yarn that resembles the same coloway as where you started the first sock. Sample shows the sock starting in white, so the second sock was started at a section of white yarn.

INSTRUCTIONS Chart JPG

Set knitting loom to 60 pegs.

Cuff

Rnd 1-Rnd 16: *k1, p1; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 17: *p1, yo, k3, ssk, k4; rep from * to end.

Rnd 18 and all even-numbered Rnds: *p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Rnd 19: *p1, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k3; rep from * to end.

Rnd 21: *p1, k2, yo, k3, ssk, k2; rep from * to end.

Rnd 23: *p1, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1; rep from * to end.

Rnd 25: *p1, k4, yo, k3, ssk; rep from * to end.

Rnds 27 and 28: *p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Continue to heel. (If you prefer a longer sock, repeat Rnds 17-28, until sock leg measures desired length, typically around 7-8 inches from cast on edge.)

Heel

The heel is a short-row heel over the first 30 stitches (takes place from peg 1 to peg 30).

New to short-row heels: directions for Short-row heel instructions can be found at the end of pattern.

If familiar with a short-row heel, simply follow the Heel and Toe Part I, decrease until there are 10 pegs unwrapped. Then follow Heel and Toe Part 2, increase back to a full 30 pegs.

Foot

**Next rnd: Skip peg 1 as it was just wrapped on the last short-row. k29, *p1, yo, k3, ssk, k4; rep from * end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k3; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k2, yo, k3, ssk, k2; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k4, yo, k3, ssk; rep from * to end.

Next 3 rnds: p1, k29: *p1, k9; rep from * to end. **

Rep from ** to ** until foot measures approx. 1.5 less than desired length.

Toe

Repeat the same steps that you used to turn the heel, making sure to use the same pegs and side of the loom as before.

Remove the live stitches from pegs 1-30 and place them on one the double pointed needles. Remove remaining 30 stitches (pegs 31-60) and place them on second double pointed needle.

Close the toe with the Kitchener stitch(see tutorial included in this post for instructions).  .

Weave ends in. Block lightly.


Short-row heel (and toe) Instructions (over 30 pegs)

  • Knit from peg 1 to peg 29, w&t peg 30.
  • Knit from peg 29 to peg 2, w&t peg 1.
  • Knit from peg 2 to peg 28, w&t peg 29.
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 3, w&t peg 2.
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 27, w&t peg 28.
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 4, w&t peg 3.
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 26, w&t peg 27.
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 5, w&t peg 4.
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 25, w&t peg 26.
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 6, w&t peg 5.
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 24, w&t peg 25.
  • Knit from peg 24 to peg 7, w&t peg 6.
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 23, w&t peg 24.
  • Knit from peg 23 to peg 8, w&t peg 7.
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 22, w&t peg 23.
  • Knit from peg 22 to peg 9, w&t peg 8.
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 21, w&t peg 22.
  • Knit from peg 21 to peg 10, w&t peg 9.
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 20, w&t peg 21.
  • Knit from peg 20 to peg 11, w&t peg 10.
  • Knit from peg 11 to peg 21, w&t peg 22 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg)
  • Knit from peg 21 to peg 10, w&t peg 9(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 22, w&t peg 23 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 22 to peg 9, w&t peg 8 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 23, w&t peg 24 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 23 to peg 8, w&t peg 7 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 24, w&t peg 25(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 24 to peg 7, w&t peg 6 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 25, w&t peg 26(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 6, w&t peg 5 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 26, w&t peg 27(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 5, w&t peg 4 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 27, w&t peg 28(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 4, w&t peg 3 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 28, w&t peg 29 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 3, w&t peg 2 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 29, w&t peg 30(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from 29 to peg 2, w&t peg 1 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).

Peg 1 and Peg 30 have the wraps on them. Continue  to the foot instructions (on the first round, you will pick up the wraps together with the stitch as you work the next round.


Crescent Stitch Pattern

Multiple of 10 stitches; 12 round repeat

Rnd 1: *p1, yo, k3, ssk, k4; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 6 and hold it. Move loop from peg 5 to 6. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 6 (two loops on peg 6).
  • Move loops from peg 4 to 5, from 3 to 4, from 2 to 3. Peg 2 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, YO peg 2 (ewrap peg 2), knit pegs 3-10 (treat both loops on peg 6 as one loop).

Rnd 2: *p1, k9 (and all even rounds).

Rnd 3: *p, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k3; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 7 and hold it. Move loop from peg 6 to 7. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 7 (two loops on peg 7).
  • Move loops from peg 5 to 6, from 4 to 5, from 3 to 4. Peg 3 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2 YO peg 3 (ewrap peg 3), knit pegs 4-10 (treat both loops on peg 7 as one loop).

Rnd 5: *p, k2, yo, k3, ssk, k2; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 8 and hold it. Move loop from peg 7 to 8. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 8 (two loops on peg 8).
  • Move loops from peg 6 to 7, from 5 to 6, from 4 to 5. Peg 4 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2, knit peg 3, YO peg 4 (ewrap peg 4), knit pegs 5-10 (treat both loops on peg 8 as one loop).

Rnd 7: *p, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 9 and hold it. Move loop from peg 8 to 9. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 9 (two loops on peg 9).
  • Move loops from peg 7 to 8, from 6 to 7, from 5 to 6. Peg 5 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2, knit peg 3, knit peg 5, YO peg 5 (ewrap peg 5), knit pegs 6-10 (treat both loops on peg 9 as one loop).

Rnd 9: *p, k4, yo, k3, ssk; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 10 and hold it. Move loop from peg 9 to 10. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 10 (two loops on peg 10).
  • Move loops from peg 8 to 9, from 7 to 8, from 6 to 7. Peg 6 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2, knit peg 3, knit peg 4, knit peg 5, YO peg 6 (ewrap peg 6), knit pegs 7-10 (treat both loops on peg 10 as one loop).

Rnd 10-12:  *p1, k9 (and all even rounds).

2 Comments

  • Lovely socks :)
    I so want to try making these lovely socks one day soon :)

  • Thank you! I hope you have the chance soon to try them.

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Jun 6, 2016

Stitchology 22 : Mermaid Scales

 

The best part about this month’s new stitch pattern is that it is so very easy to accomplish, with only four rows to repeat and a technique that is worked over just 2 pegs…nice!  The most difficult part for me this time around was trying to decide what it most reminded me of to be able to choose a name, lol!  When I look at this square, I see a pretty lattice design that is anchored with knots on each side, but I also see four-pointed little flowers, sea stars, and even water droplets.  The more I got to looking at it, the more it seemed to be quite intricate and even a little mesmerizing. The knitting chart even turned out to resemble a sea full of rolling waves!  Mermaids seemed the perfect idea to convey a little bit of mystery, along with all things sparkling sea and sand for the beginning of summer. I hope you think so too…Enjoy!

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)  To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Mermaid Scales Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage neptune)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

 

Pattern Notes:

*For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

*When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.  When the stitch requires an e-wrap, it will be noted.

*All slip stitches (s1) for this pattern are completed by carrying the working yarn behind the peg(s).
Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
CO: cast on
ew E-wrap stitch
s1: slip/skip one peg
k: knit
KO: knit off
wy: working yarn
ssk: slip, slip, knit
m1: make one/increase by one
BO: bind off

__________________________________________________________________

*For ease in reading the pattern’s directions below, the steps  involving the pattern’s lacy stitch are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two pegs.

This pattern creates eyelets by the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) method, for a left leaning eyelet. The following dictates how to work them, along with the lace method, into the pattern:

[s1, ssk, m1, ew]:  Work over just 2 pegs (from right to left):

  • Move the loop from the s1 peg to the ssk peg.
  • Carry the wy behind the empty s1 peg to the ssk peg.
  • Knit off the first loop on the ssk peg and rather than letting the loop drop behind the peg, slide it back over the s1 peg for a “make one”(m1).
  • Knit off the 2nd loop on the ssk peg.
  • E-wrap the s1 peg and knit off.
  • Move to the next 2 pegs in line and prepare to ssk.  The wy will be carried behind both the original ssk peg and the newly empty s1 peg of the next 2 pegs in line.

____________________________________________________________________

*Please view this handy video for an easy to visualize tutorial on how to work the [s1, ssk, m1, ew] on only 2 pegs:  (*Clarification Note: the video describes the eyelet decrease as a knit 2 together (k2tog), but because it is a left leaning decrease, it is actually an ssk. ;) )

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

(*Note: The knits in Rows 2 and 4 are only added at the beginning and end of each of the rows to make them offset from one another. The repeating stitch count is actually in multiples of 2 + 1 for knitting in a flat panel. Check out the chart below of the entire square to see this in action.)

Row 1: k3.

Row 2: *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], rep from *,  k1.

Row 3: k3.

Row 4: k1, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], rep from *.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 30 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p30.

Row 2: k30.

Row 3: p30.

Main Pattern Rows

Mermaid Scales Stitch angleRow 4:  k30.

Row 5:  p3, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], repeat from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 6:  k30.

Row 7:  p3, k1, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], repeat from * to last 4 sts, k1, p3.

Rows 8-53:  Repeat Rows 4-7.

Row 54: k30.

Finishing Rows

Row 55: k30.

Row 56: p30.

Row 57: k30.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.  This particular square is worked a tad smaller than 8″ x 8″, so that once blocked, the pattern will open up to show the eyelets at their best.  A thorough soaking and pinning to the 8″ x 8″ measurement is required to achieve the proper size.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

6 Comments

  • I love the mermaid scale stitch. I have been searching for the “how to ” for this stitch. I am looking for a loom knitting pattern for the full mermaid tail for an adult and have had no luck finding one. Would you happen to have a pattern for the mermaid tail?

  • Hi Nancy! :) I’m so glad you like the stitch…I love the visual depths it produces, with so little effort! All the how-to information on this particular stitch is included in this post. ;)

    I will say that there is a terrific mermaid tail blanket for the looms released here:
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/loom-knit-mermaid-tail-blanket

    It uses the crocodile stitch, but you could substitute this Mermaid Scale stitch in place of it for a much simpler choice. I would love to see it when you have finished!

    Bethany~

  • This looks stunning. I’d like to make a scarf with this stitch. Would leaving off the garter edge on the sides make it curl? Thanks for the helpful video. I always look forward to your posts Bethany.

  • Oh, wonderful, Cindy! I’m so happy to hear this stitch (and the others) are well received…thank you!

    As for leaving off the garter borders, I think you will be ok. I didn’t notice any significant curling with this one, and it does require a bit of blocking to open up the stitch, which would also stop the curling. Just remember to use a wool, or another natural fiber that blocks well. :)

    Happy looming!
    Bethany~

  • Bethany, I love this stitch. My daughter in law wants a baby mermaid blanket as a photo prop. I believe this stitch will be perfect.
    Thank you for sharing.

  • Oh, I’m so glad you will find it useful, Carol! :) I can’t wait to see your finished mermaid blanket!

    Bethany~

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Jun 3, 2016

Double Knit 101-Part IV

Change of Color with Stripes and Design

There are many patterns in our free pattern library that incorporate stripes and fun intarsia designs.  Here are a few designs that you may recognize from our afghan patterns.  Let’s go over the basics in working with color changes and creating designs.

EXAMPLES OF CHANGE OF COLOR

Crayon Box Throw uses basic horizontal stripes.  These can be worked in any amount of rows, which will determine how thick the stripe will be.  The colors begin at start of a row and go to the end of the row.  Horizontal stripes can also be used to create a border at bottom and top of the knitted piece.

Vertical stripes are a bit different in that they are created with selected stitches and repeated on the same pins in each row.  With each row, the stripe grows longer.

They can also be used in just a few rows to create checker board designs.

painted_desert2__35124.1419381330.1280.1280

 

 

Painted Desert Afghan, uses vertical and horizontal stripes for the 2 color design and the border.  We used wide stripes to create the side panels.  The 3 panels were sewn together with the invisible stitch.

Checkerboard is created with vertical stripes for several rows and groups of stitches in one color, and then, by shifting the rows to different stitches,  for  several additional rows.  They can be created with just 2 colors or many.  If you are just exploring this concept, I would suggest starting with just a couple colors.  Tangled yarns can be frustrating-but we can talk about ways to assist with this when we start Intarsia                                                         .

afghan_new_daisyc__80278.1456511116.1280.1280

 

When we designed this large afghan, the New Daisy Afghan , we used a 2 color design by adding colors into the knit creating intarsia flowers.  The 2 color side panels were knit separately and all three strips were sewn together using invisible stitch.

 

 

chickie_blanket__89902.1419908673.1280.1280

 

In our Little Chickie Blanket, you can see how colors are used within the knit to create the ‘Chickie’.  Also vertical and horizontal stripes are used for the letters and the 2-tone stripe section.  This little blanket was knit is 3 strips, but the change of colors makes it look like squares.  The border was added as a separate piece and sewn on using invisible stitch.  This sewing stitch is illustrated in Part III tutorial.

 

 

INTARSIA

So what does ‘Intarsia’ really mean? According to wikipedia, it means a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colors.  In single knit, the main color is traditionally dropped behind the peg of a different color as in a slip stitch.  So at end of color design, the backside is a maze of yarn colors.  In double knit, its a bit different as the color changes are made between the 2 rows of stitches, so they are most often not seen;  but, the really great thing about double knit, is that the color design is seen on both sides.  This is why double knit intarsia afghans and scarves are so beautiful.

Basic Horizontal Stripe: We are working with blue and want to create a white stripe.  Pull the white thru the 3rd stitch in center of loom, just under the last row.  Keep the blue yarn attached as we will only make the white stripe about 3 rows wide.  Then we will continue with the blue again.  You will see in the photos that the blue yarn is moved slightly with each row, so it doesn’t get caught up in the white row.

tie to 3rd stitch

tie and lay yarn down

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

weave the white row

Work 3 rows with white yarn.  Once complete, lay white aside and work rows with the blue.  By keeping both yarns attached, we will be ready when we want to start some vertical stripes.  If you plan to do more than 3 or 4 rows of a color stripe, it may be best to cut the blue, tie white to blue at 3rd stitch, and then work with new color.  Then lay both yarn tails down and continue.

Once you weave and hook over the desired number of rows with the white stripe, lay the white aside and continue with the blue yarn.

new row of blue on white

Continue with the blue knit for as many rows as desired, and maybe change back to the white for another stripe, or maybe tie in another new color.

For now, let’s work 2 rows of the blue.  Keep both colors attached, because from here, we will be able to go right into some vertical stripes.

checkerboard

Here is an example of a scarf with horizontal, vertical, and checkerboard.

In this scarf, it is the same process as with the blue and white yarns.  We have blue knit with a 3 row white stripe, and then 2 rows of blue.  Now, let’s create vertical stripes to match the vertical stripes in the Checkerboard Scarf.

Vertical Stripes: Start vertical stripes by weaving the blue around 2 stitches, skip 2 stitches, blue for 2 stitches, skip 2 stitches, and continue to  the end of the piece.  See below example of full circular.  The row is worked in stockinette stitch, skipping the pegs where the white yarn will be worked in. The white yarn will fill in the stitches that were skipped.

start of verticle

 

full weave of vertical

 

 

 

 

Now add the white yarn in stockinette stitch.

You can see the previous row is already done.  By repeating this row with both colors, you will have vertical stripes growing with the knit.

 

white stripe:blue:verticle

 

 

Now, you may be wondering if we could do these vertical stripes with the white yarn in b/b stitch (back to back weaving).  When you are working only 2 stitches of a color, that is a good option also.  Or you may work the blue in b/b, and then weave the white in stockinette.  I think you are beginning to see how this can be expanded into multiple color designs.

 

checkerboard with knit

 

 

Checkerboard Design:

To create a checkerboard design, work the vertical stripe like above for 3 or 4 rows, the white loops over white, and blue over blue. Then alternate colors.  Now do 3 or 4 rows of blue where the white stitches were, and the white where the blue ones were.  See photo.  This will shift the vertical stripes into checkerboard like on the brown scarf above.  But lets look at how the weave will be different if we use some b/b stitches for clarity.

bb white w:blu

 

As you can see, the white stitches in back/back stitch look pretty much the same as stockinette only a little looser.

The best time to use the b/b weaving is within a piece of knit creating a small design.

Weave the white over b/b, 2 stitches, move across to next white stitches until all white stitches are covered.

b:b 2

Weave over the white stitches in stockinette in blue for a  full circular so that all pegs are covered.  Hook over.  Repeat.  Remember in doing any design, be sure to cast on amount of stitches to complete the sequence.  Here, we just want even amount of stitches, so the 2-stitch vertical stripe or checkerboard design comes out even.

blue over bb1

compkete blue over bb

 

 

 

 

 

 

When doing a knitted piece with a small design in it, you will tie on the color of design, close to where the stitches begin.  Work the color stitches in that row in b/b stitch.  Lay yarn down, and pick up main color and work in stockinette stitch. Work each row, one at a time, using the color sts when required keeping the yarn attached until the design is complete.  Tie to working yarn and cut. Weave in the color yarn tail.

We will dive into intarsia with graphs and multiple colors in another tutorial.  Next month, we will shift focus and see a few new double knit stitches that everyone of all skill levels can enjoy.

Double Knit Tutorial Series: Part I      Part II       Part III

 

2 Comments

  • Thank you for the great tutorial on double knit color change. My daughter and I were trying (with limited success) to change colors. I saw your Advent creations and they looked beautiful but I was afraid to try them. Now I have worked up to the second color change of the checkerboard and it looks great. I’ll be trying some of the Advent projects this fall! Thank you for teaching us. I had just two questions: in double knitting when one changes color is there a need to “twist” the yarns ? Secondly, what is back to back weaving? Thank you for the great instructions.

  • Hi Cindy, So happy that you and your daughter are enjoying colors in your knitting. The back to back or b/b weave is shown and explained in Part 1 and the link is at bottom of this tutorial. But this is also shown in this tutorial where the weaving is front to back rather than the stockinette. Thank you for asking about twisting the yarns, as it is important in color change. If you are working in stockinette where one color is across the weave of the other, you do not need to twist the yarns at the junction of 2 colors meeting. This is because the stockinette will lock the knit together. If, however, you are working in color blocks with 2 different yarns that are not woven over each other, you will want to twist them where they meet. Otherwise, the sections will not be connected in finished knit and will need some ‘sewing’ to connect them. You may find that if you are adding a small amount of a color in your design, it makes twisting easier to cut a small amount of yarn for that section rather than working with 2 large skeins of yarn.

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May 27, 2016

Silken Byways Handbag

Silken Byways Handbag-frontTraditional saris, woven with heavy silk and gold and silver cloth, are highly treasured and worn during special occasions and festivities within the Indian culture.

This vibrant and somewhat free spirited handbag is created using yarn made from recycled sari remnants…a wonderful way to enjoy the exquisite beauty of sari silk, with our more casual western ways in mind.

 

Loom:  Adjustable Hat Loom, 28 pegs in every other hole.

Yarn:  Approx 90 yards/143 g of bulky weight recycled sari silk ribbon yarn. Sample used SilkIndian Ribbon Yarn (1.5 skeins in the multi) 60 yds/100 g.

Notions:   knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, row counter, large decorative button, one tassel, one strap (sample uses a curtain tie-back cord).

Gauge: Approx 8 sts x 12.5 rows= 4 inches

Size:  7” high x 7” wide x 3.5” deep at base.

Abbreviations

Approx: approximately
sts: stitches
CO: cast on
EW: E-wrap stitch
KO: knit off
WY: working yarn
BO: bind off

Pattern Notes:
All knits are worked as E-wrap stitches throughout.  When working an EW with the ribbon yarn, be sure to wrap and knit off just one peg at a time.  Leave extra looseness in each wrap after knitting off, so that the following rows won’t be too tight to manage.

This pattern uses a Drawstring Cast On for ease in gathering the bottom of the bag.  Please see this helpful web tutorial for more details:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkTsM3WjKQU

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Set loom to work in the round using 28 pegs in every other hole.  Going in a COUNTER CLOCKWISE direction, Drawstring CO to all 28 pegs.

Rows 1-24:  Work very loose EW on all 28 pegs.

Row 25:  Basic BO pegs 1-14, EW pegs 15-28.

Row 26:  EW pegs 28-15.

**Note: The WY should now be on the left side of the pegs being worked. If it’s not, simply switch the diagram below to work as if a mirror opposite.

  

Row 27:  Using the peg diagram above, work the 2 left side decreases as follows:

  • *Move the loop from peg 2 to peg 3 and KO.
  • *Move the loop from peg 1 to peg 2.
  • *Basic BO peg 1.

*EW knit the remaining pegs in line. 

Silken Byways Handbag- close up edgeRow 28:  Basic BO first peg of row.  EW knit the remaining pegs in line.

Rows 29-33:  Repeat Rows 27 & 28.  When done, there will only be 3 pegs with loops remaining.

Row 34:  Basic BO first peg in row. EW and KO 4 times on peg 2 only.  Move loop from peg 2 to peg 3, KO.  Trim yarn and pull through loop.  Cinch tightly.

 

FINISHING

Pull tail at CO edge to gather until there remains a 2” opening.  Stitch this 2” opening closed so that it will lay flat and serve as the bag bottom.

Weave in all ends and trim any long threads from the ribbon yarn’s natural frays.  Feel free to stretch the bag and asymmetrical flap into shape.  The firm nature of the ribbon yarn allows for some adjustment of the knitting into the preferred form.

Stitch the button in place at the bag front just inside the button loop, along with the tassel, and handles of choice.

If desired, the bag can be lined, or it can be left in its natural state.

7 Comments

  • Is it possible to use any other type of loom? My hat loom pegs broke!

  • Oh no, Erin! I’m so sorry to hear that! :P This is one of the big reasons the pattern talks about making your stitches *very* loosely. But, as for another loom to use this project on, any one of a large gauge would do. Perhaps a loom with fixed pegs would be better for you. You might even try it on a Zippy, but you’d most likely need to line the bag after you’ve completed the knitting, as the stitches may have extra spaces between them. Best of wishes for your success! :)

  • Hi Erin, I would let the company know about the issue of your hat loom by email to info@knittingboard.com. They will be happy to discuss this with you.

  • Can the sashay yarn be used for this pattern?

  • Hi Kerri! :) Yes, the Sashay yarn held all bunched up as one strand of thick yarn would be a great match for this project…terrific idea! :)

  • Can you use the All in one loom to make this bag

  • Hi Margaret :)

    Well, you can use the All-n-One for this, but you would need to change the yarn used, as the silk ribbon used in the pattern would be too thick for the gauge of that loom. Then, of course, you may wish to change the number of pegs used and rows worked so that you end up with the size bag that you wish to have. ;) I would highly recommend making a swatch first and then doing a little math to determine the desired numbers.

    Best wishes! :)

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May 20, 2016

iPad Cozy

Ipad bag

Knit a fashionable iPad cozy to keep your iPad safe from bumps. The felted material also protects the iPad from unwanted spills.

LOOM:  Hat Loom, set at large gauge, at M size (40 pegs every other hole)

YARN:  Approx 275 yds of wool mohair blend bulky weight yarn. Lamb’s Pride Bulky in Cranberry Swirl (250yds) and Lime Sorbet (25 yds) was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, row marker (safety pin)

Other: Decorative button, approx 1/2″

GAUGE: 3.5 sts x 4 rows = 2 inches.

SIZE:  Pre-felted: 14.5″ W x  10.5″ H (including flap folded over the front)

Felted: 10″ W x 8″ H

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

Rep=Repeat

MC=Main color (Cranberry Swirl)

CC=Contrasting Color (Lime Sorbet)

INSTRUCTIONS Ipad Bag prefelted

Using MC, cast on 36 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1: ewrap k to end of row.

Row 2: p to end of row.

Row 1 and Row 2=1 Garter Stitch ridge.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2, until you have 48 Garter Stitch ridges

Next row: ewrap k to end of row.

Next row, BO 2, p to end. (Place a row marker at this point).

Rep last 2 rows until 8 sets rem.

BO with basic bind off method.

Fold the panel so that the cast on edge lines up with the row that has the stitch marker. Using tapestry needle and MC, mattress stitch down the sides. Weave ends in.

I-cord for flap

Using CC, work a 3-stitch i-cord that is approximately 24 inches long. Using tapestry needle and CC, mattress stitch the i-cord to the tapered flap of the bag, starting at the beginning of the tapered edge, loop the end of the i-cord to form a loop, secure to the edge of the flap.

Button

After felting (see instructions below for felting), fold the flap over to see where to place the button. Sample shows button at the bottom right of the flap. Sew the button in place to the bottom part of the bag. Fold flap over, with a knife of scissors make an opening to the flap, big enough to allow the button to pass through.

Ipad Bag Open Prefelted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assembly: using the mattress stitch, seam the icord to the cast on edge of the oven mitt. Create a small loop with the remaining icord (to use for hanging)

FELTING INSTRUCTIONS 

The magic in this knitting happens when you wash the untreated wool with hot water and the item shrinks, making the stitches smaller, and the fabric thicker.

You will need the following:

1 pillow case with a zipper

Safety Pin

2-3 jeans (to use in agitation)

Eucalan Woolwash or Baby Shampoo

Towels (to squeeze out excess water).

Top Loader Washer

INSTRUCTIONS

Place all items to be felted inside the zippered pillow case. Secure the zipper with the safety pin (to ensure the pillow case doesn’t open).

Set washer to Small load, and Hot temperature.

Place 1 tsp of Eucalan Woolwash or 1 tsp of Baby Shampoo.

Place the jeans inside the washer.

Place the pillow case inside the washer.

Start the washer. Check the washer again BEFORE it goes into the spin cycle. If the item is not the desired size, re-start the washer from the beginning (simply turn the knob back to the beginning of the wash). Place the pillow case back in the washer and let it go through another cycle, stopping the washer BEFORE it was through the spin cycle. Check again. If not desired size, repeat. *The above samples took 3 cycles.

Once the items are the desired size, remove the items from the pillow case. Take them to the sink. If you used Eucalan Woolwash, rinsing is not required. If you used Baby Shampoo, rinse in cold water. Do not wring the excess water. Place a towel on a flat surface, then place the felted item on top of the towel. Pat dry as much as you can.

Set the items to air dry, away from the sun. The sun may discolor the yarn.

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May 18, 2016

Plaid Rug from T-shirts

Designed by Lindsay Obermeyer

Rug_plaid

Needed

Size:  Rug 14″ x 22.5″ Each panel 7″ x 22.5″

Loom: All-n-One Loom or 28″ Loom, plus a set of loom extenders.

T-Shirts: 1 orange, yellow, peach, green and white t-shirts and 2 grey t-shirts with minimal text or graphics.

Notions: scissors, size J crochet hook, ruler, crochet cotton, such as Sugar and Cream in a color to match the t-shirts, Tapestry needle, ball headed pins

 

Panel one: Orange Plaid

Set up: make t-shirt loopies

©2016Obermeyer-t-shirt-loop-process

Fold the t-shirt in half , lining up the sleeves. Smooth out the wrinkles with your hand. Cut off the bottom band.   Measure and cut a 2” wide strip across the shirt through both layers. Trim off the seam ends. With the fabric still folded in half, cut a slit straight up the center until about a ¼ inch from the end. You now have 2 strips with slits up them. Round off the corners. Take one strip and pull it taught while holding onto each end. The strip will stretch, the edges will curl in and you now have a warp loopie.

Make 2 green warp loopies, 9 yellow and 9 orange warp loopies for a total of 20.

To make the weft loopies , Cut 8” x 2” strips of the t-shirt. (Use every scrap of the t-shirt, including sleeves). Fold each strip in half, cut a slit up the center and round off the edges.

Make 22 peach, 17 orange, 15 yellow weft loopies.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Warp the loom in the following color order 6 yellow, 1 green, 3 yellow, 3 orange, 1 green, 6 orange.

©2016LindsayObermeyerPlaidRug-weaving

Weft Color Pattern

Weave in a basic over and under manner the following color sequence:  5 orange, 1 green, 5 yellow 1 green 8 peach 1 green 6 orange, 1 green, 5 yellow, 8 peach, 1 green, 7 orange, 1 green, 5 yellow, 1 green, 7 peach.

Finishing / Binding off the fabric from the loom

When you finish weaving in the last strip, crochet bind off the fabric off of the loom. Use a J hook and lift the first loop on the top of the warp onto your hook, proceed and add the loop next to it. Then lift the first loop up and over the second loop, proceed to the third loop and place it on your hook, then take the 2nd loop and lift it up and over the third loop, you will continue in this fashion all the way around the loom, until only one loop remains on your hook. You will pull this loop and weave it into the structure of your weave using either your hook or a tapestry needle.

 

©2016Obermeyer-seaming-plaid

 

 

 

Seam your 2 pieces together with yarn and tapestry needle.

6 Comments

  • With the fabric still folded in half, cut a slit straight up the center until about a ¼ inch from the end. You now have 2 strips with slits up them—Do you have pics of this step? It’s a little confusing to me. =)

  • Thus reminds me of making potholders for my Mom @ the playground in summer. Thanks for the idea! :)

  • Hi Dana, Sorry we do not have pics of this step. I will send your question to the designer for you. Thanks.

  • Just a note for folks, was in Hobby Lobby the other day and notice they have T-shirt knit on a cone in different colors already cut. If anyone is interested.

  • Love this article. Your expertise is much appreciated. Thanks, Caroline

  • Would it be possible to make this using the sashay yarn instead of the recommended yarn? I have some left over with no use and don’t want to make scarves and its just sitting in my yarn bucket staring at me saying “when will I get used”

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May 16, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Is Laddering?

10940466_663261290449770_6723370072072730651_n

 

 

 

 

The first thing most people learn when learning to loom knit is how to work the e-wrap knit stitch.  Some people only use this stitch to create endless items.  It’s a very simple stitch that many prefer over the knit stitch or even learning the purl stitch.  Nothing wrong with that.  It is a knit stitch after all.  And an easy one.  Think I said that already.

But it has its drawbacks.  Beginners always have that same question when making hats or other items worked in the round.  Why do I have a large gap between the first and last stitch?  It only happens with e-wrap worked in the round.  Never with flat panels.  Why is that?  It really is a simple answer.  Let’s talk about the laddering effect.

What is laddering?

Laddering is that gap between the first and last stitch of a project worked in the round when using the e-wrap knit stitch when the entire loom is wrapped before knitting over.  It leaves the yarn between the stitches in horizontal lines that looks like a ladder.  Hence the name.

Here is an example of laddering:

Ladder effect with e-wrap knit stitch

Ladder effect with e-wrap knit stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why does it happen?

Laddering happens when all the pegs on the entire loom are wrapped then knit over.  This is due to each stitch getting looser has the bottom loop is lifted over the top loop.  It is actually on the round below, not the round just wrapped.  With the twist in the stitch, each stitch gets pulled a little when knit over making the next one a little looser when it is knit over.  And so on until you end the round with that extra between the first and last stitch.  By the time the last stitch is worked, there is enough of a gap to be noticed.

This is why it doesn’t happen with flat panels.  The extra bit that creates the ladder when working in the round ends up at the edge.

Sometimes this will not happen with bulkier yarns especially if the yarn is slightly bulkier than the loom gauge requires.

Is it due to tension?

Tension is not really the issue when it comes to laddering.  Some people like to use yarn guides or empty pens to make it faster to wrap the pegs.  This will not prevent laddering.  Laddering happens when knitting over, not how tight you wrap the pegs.

But why is mine laddering between all the stitches??

If using a smaller yarn weight than the loom gauge like using 1 strand of worsted with a large gauge loom, laddering will happen between each stitch with e-wrap whether in the round or a flat panel.  The twist in the stitch will keep the stitches from pulling together when off the loom.

Example of 1 strand worsted on large gauge loom

Example of 1 strand worsted on large gauge loom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This effect is sometimes desired for lacier projects.  But if it’s not desired, make sure the yarn weight matches the gauge of the loom.  Learn more on yarn weights and which gauge loom to use here.

How do I prevent laddering in my work?

The best way to prevent laddering is one not often preferred.  That is to wrap and knit over each peg as you go.  That way each stitch is exactly the same.  But most people prefer to wrap the loom first.  And that leads us to the next question.

Are there other ways to prevent it without working each peg as you go?

Some people say to start and stop at different pegs on each round.  That will work as long as those pegs that you are stopping at are not next to each other.  If you stop at the one before the last peg you stopped at on the previous round, the laddering will be on a diagonal instead of vertical.

If you wrap the pegs in shorter sections then knit over before going on to the next section, the amount of yarn that is made loose is not as much and therefore not as noticed.  If you wrap only 5 to 10 pegs at a time, the laddering effect will not happen.

Will it “fix” itself if left alone?

Yes.  Most times, if the item is given time to relax, the stitches will “fix” themselves, and the ladder will disappear.   Blocking will help too depending on the fiber used.

 

While I am not one to use e-wrap knit stitch very often, it is a wonderful stitch that can add texture or is just easy to work.  If you are ready to make that next step to a different knit stitch, please check out my article Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch?

Until next time!  Happy loom knitting!

3 Comments

  • This is very good article. I will definitely add this to my “need to know” folder.

  • Thanks Jonnita.

  • Wrap and knit over each peg as you go is the only way I do Ewrap knit, both as flat panel and in the round. It makes a tremendous difference. I also use it as a cast on and the result is less loopy than the traditional Ewrap cast on. This method works great on hats too. Thanks for the great article.

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May 15, 2016

Springtime Yoga Bag

yogabag2Springtime is here! The birds are chirping, the sun welcomes us each morning with is warm rays. It is the perfect time to grab that yoga mat and head to the nearest park to enjoy a relaxing yoga class.

LOOM:  Hat Loom, set at small gauge, at XS size (56 pegs)

YARN:  Approx 250 yds of cotton worsted weight yarn. Bernat Handicrafter Cotton in Nautical was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, crochet hook size D.

GAUGE: 7 sts x 12 rows = 2 inches.

SIZE:  Fits a 24” width yoga mat.  

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

k2tog=knit two stitches together

YO=Yarn over (Ewrap the empty peg, on the following round, undo the ewrap and place this stitch in front of the peg and then work it as instructed (this pattern indicates to knit the peg)).

INSTRUCTIONS

Bag

Cast on 56 sts, join to work in the rnd.

Row 1: p to end of rnd.

Row 2: k to end of rnd.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: 2 more times.

Next rnd: *k2tog, yo; rep from * to end of rnd.

Next rnd: p to end of rnd.

Next rnd: k to end of rnd.

Rep last 2 rnds: 2 more times.

Next rnd: *k2tog, yo; rep from * to end of rnd.

Next rnd: k to end of rnd.

Rep from ** to **: until panel measures: 24 inches from cast on edge.

Bind off with gather removal method.

Strap

Cast on 7 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1: Sl1, k to end of row.

Row 2: Sl1, p5, k1.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: until strap measures 30 inches long.

Bind off with basic bind off.

Secure strap to the bag.

Crochet cord

With size D crochet hook, crochet a chain that is about 24 inches long. Bind off. Pass the cord through the eyelet openings through the garter stitch border. Make a knot at each end of the cord.

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May 9, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Lollipop

Whimsical Loom Knits – May 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

IMG_3515

This adorable lollipop is quick, easy, and so much fun to make!  Plus, it is a fantastic way to use up little bits of yarn left over from other projects.  Whip up a scrumptious batch of lollipops in all of your favorite ‘flavors’!

 

Knitting Loom: KB Hat Loom

Yarn: Worsted weight cotton yarn.  Peaches & Crème was used for the samples.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, tape measure, hot glue gun and glue sticks, 4” lollipop sticks, scrap of felt.

Gauge: Not critical for this project.

Finished Measurements: Approximately 1 ¾ “ in diameter (excluding the stick)

 

Instructions

Create a 3 peg i-cord:  Leave a 14” yarn tail.  Make a slip knot and place it on the first peg.  Wrap the 2nd peg and the 3rd peg.  *Take the working yarn behind the 2nd peg and the 1st peg.  Bring the working yarn around the front of the first peg and lay it across pegs 1, 2, and 3 – above the loops that are already on the pegs.  Knit the 3rd peg, the 1st peg, and then the 2nd peg.  Repeat from * five times.  Gently pull on the i-cord to help set the stitches in place and lengthen the cord.  Continue working in this manner until the i-cord measures 10” in length.

Bind off:  Move the stitch on peg 1 to peg 2.  Knit peg 2.  Move the stitch on peg 3 to peg 2.  Knit peg 2.    Cut the working yarn.  Lay the yarn tail across the front of peg 2.  Knit the last stitch over the yarn tail and pull the yarn tail out through the stitch.  Gently pull on the yarn tail to tighten up the bind off.

 

Finishing

Begin shaping the i-cord into a coil:  Thread the 14” yarn tail into the eye of the yarn needle.  Pull the yarn needle through the i-cord, approximately ¾ of an inch from the end.

IMG_3507

Continue coiling and stitching the i-cord into a spiral.

IMG_3508

IMG_3509

Once the i-cord has been shaped into a spiral, weave in both yarn tails.

IMG_3510

Using the hot glue gun, glue a sucker stick to the back of the spiral.

IMG_3511

Cut a circle from the felt and glue it over the sucker stick.

IMG_3512

All done!  Easy Peasy!

 

IMG_3514

Enjoy!

 

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May 2, 2016

Stitchology 21 : Bunnies on Parade

Spring has sprung and apparently I can’t think about anything other than sweet little bunny rabbits while knitting!  I simply meant to do an interesting new technique for May’s Stitchology, and guess what?  It came out with bunnies prancing across the square in neat and orderly rows. I’m definitely not one to deny my love for those furry creatures, so bunny rabbits it is! :)  The neat thing about this stitch is that the backside is really pretty too, and looks like an entirely different stitch altogether.  Because of this, Bunnies on Parade would be a terrific stitch for making items that can be reversible such as blankets, hats, scarves…you name it!

It’s Reversible!

Back Side of Stitch

Back Side of Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Bunnies on Parade Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in banane)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

 

Pattern Notes:

This versatile stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to pretty much any type of project.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 2—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The abbreviation “rep” stands for “repeat”.

The abbreviation “wy” stands for “working yarn”.

 

*There are two types of Slip Stitches in this stitch pattern.  They are worked in the following ways:

s1: Slip one stitch with working yarn in back (worked over one peg) 

How to do it: *Simply carry the working yarn behind the peg, without working the loop on the peg.

s2wyif/p2:  Slip two stitches with working yarn in front, then purl the same two stitches (worked over 2 pegs, from right to left)

How to do it

*Lift the loop from peg #1 and carry the working yarn in the space in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace held loop. Repeat for peg #2.

*Bring the working yarn around to the back of peg #2, and carry behind both pegs #2 and #1, finally bringing around to the front of peg #1 again.

*Purl pegs #1 and #2.

**Note: See the tutorial video at the bottom of this post for a more visual instruction tool. 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Stitchology 21- Square

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

 

Step by Step Instructions:

Bunnies on Parade-close back

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 40 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  P40

Row 2:  K40

Row 3:  P40

Row 4:  K40

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: P3, *s2wyif/p2, rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 6: K3, *p1, s1, rep from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 7: P3, *s1, p1, rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 8: K40

Rows 9-68:  Rep Rows 5-8.

Finishing Rows

Row 69: P40

Row 70:  K40

Row 71:  P40

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

 

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

2 Comments

  • I’m wanting to make a shaw with finger lace weight yarn using the “star stitch.” I have only found 1 video on you tube but it’s using a “bulky” yarn. But I’m afraid that my loom’s & that the yarn is to fine for my project. Do you think my project “can” be completed on a loom? I’m afraid that because my yarn is to fine it may not work!
    Thank you for your time.
    CH

  • Hi Cindy :)

    I think it would be possible, but you will need to match your yarn with the properly gauged loom. A fine gauge, or extra fine gauge loom might be the best for you. You can always try a small section of the pattern as a swatch to see how it will come out…only way to know for sure if you like the results. ;)

    Best of luck to you!

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Apr 29, 2016

Felted Casserole Cozy

With the warmer weather comes those special events we all love: pot lucks, barbecues, family reunions, and sports outings.  This project is exactly the thing needed to keep those tasty dishes insulated while transporting them to their destination.  The thick felted wool creates the perfect barrier to help hot dishes remain hot and cold ones stay chilled in the sun’s warming rays.

Knitting Loom: KB Hat Loom set to large gauge (pegs in every other hole), 28 pegs used.

Yarn: Approximately 950 yards of worsted weight 100% wool yarn, two strands held as one. Sample used Patons Classic Wool Worsted (2 skeins in each of the colors Jade Heather and Rich Red, 1/2 skein in the color Leaf Green, 1/4 skein in the color Winter White) 210 yds/192 m.

Notions: knitting tool, 6mm crochet hook (for cast on and help with possible missed stitches, etc), stitch markers, scissors, knitting pins, yarn needle, row counter, one large and a few small decorative buttons, as desired.  Also needed for felting process: hot water, either in washing machine or in large tub, 1 tablespoon laundry soap or baking soda, thick towels, old jeans or dryer balls to aid in the felting process if using a washing machine.

Gauge: Approx 9.33 sts x 17.75 rows= 4 inches (before felting)

Finished Measurements: Before felting: 17″ x 12″ x 5″ After felting: approximately 15″ x 9″ x 3″  (The size of this cover can be adjusted by changing the number of pegs used and rows knitted, as well as custom fitted by felting the item to fit the specific pan desired for use.)

Skills Needed: E-wrap, Chain CO (or CO of your choice), Basic BO, seaming method of choice (sample used single crochet), felting techniques.

Abbreviations:
CO: cast on
EW: E-wrap stitch
KO: knit off
WY: working yarn
BBO: basic bind off

Pattern Notes:
This pattern uses 2 strands of yarn held throughout.

The instructions below are for the exact color combination used for the sample.  If another look is desired, simply work in the color pattern of choice, keeping the total row count the same as the original.

Felted Casserole Cozy-side

Instructions

Set loom to work in a flat panel using 28 pegs in every other hole.

Top Panel

CO onto all 28 pegs. (Sample used Chain CO)

Rows 1-11:  Work EW on all 28 pegs using 2 strands of Rich Red.

Rows 12-16: Cut 1 strand of Rich Red to 4″ and hold 1 strand of Jade Heather with uncut strand of Rich Red and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Rows 17-27:  Cut strand of Rich Red to 4″ and hold 2 strands of Jade Heather and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Rows 28-32: Cut 1 strand of Jade Heather to 4″ and hold 1 strand of Winter White with uncut strand of Jade Heather and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Rows 33-43:  Cut strand of Jade Heather to 4″ and hold 2 strands of Winter White and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Rows 44-48: Cut 1 strand of Winter White to 4″ and hold 1 strand of Leaf Green with uncut strand of Winter White and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Rows 49-59:  Cut strand of Winter White to 4″ and hold 2 strands of Leaf Green and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Rows 60-64: Cut 1 strand of Leaf Green to 4″ and hold 1 strand of Rich Red with uncut strand of Leaf Green and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Rows 65-75:  Cut strand of Leaf Green to 4″ and hold 2 strands of Rich Red and work EW on all 28 pegs.

Loosely BBO all 28 pegs.

Bottom Panel

CO onto all 28 pegs. (Sample used Chain CO)

Rows 1-88:  Work EW on all 28 pegs using 2 strands of Jade Heather.

Rows 89-100: Continue to work in EW, but decrease 2 stitches at each row using the following method:

*Move the loops from the 2nd pegs from both edges to the outside pegs.

*KO the bottom loop over the top loop at the outside pegs.

*Move the loop from the outside pegs inward one peg to fill in the gaps.

*Work row.

BBO remaining 4 pegs.

Sides Panel

CO onto 12 pegs. (Sample used Chain CO)

Rows 1-200:  Work EW on all 12 pegs using 2 strands of Rich Red.

Loosely BBO all 12 pegs.

 FRONT before felting

FRONT before felting

 BACK before felting

BACK before felting

Finishing

Pin the long side panel evenly onto both the top and bottom panels, keeping the extra length of the bottom panel free by centering the side panel at the flat edge opposite the tapered edge. There should be approximately 4″ left free before it starts to taper to a point.  Being careful not to pull too tightly which will cause puckering, neatly stitch the edges of the panels together (sample used a single crochet stitch  in Leaf Green, but a blanket stitch or mattress stitch could also be used. To keep continuity of the contrasting seam, a single crocheted edge was also applied across the bottom panel’s tapered end as well as ends of

side panel.)

Weave in all ends that will be visible at the opening, and simply make a square knot and trim all other ends.

Felting

**Please Note!** During felting, the wool will shrink significantly. Careful watch over the felting process is required to ensure that the piece doesn’t shrink too much.
If using a washing machine, place the piece inside a laundry bag or tightly tied pillow case before felting.  This will help keep the extra fuzz produced in the felting process from clogging the machine. Set the machine to the hot/normal cycle and add a pair of old jeans or two (ones that will not bleed color) or dryer balls for plenty of agitation.  Add a tablespoon of laundry soap or baking powder to help soften the wool fibers. Let the cycle run for approx 15-20 minutes, checking regularly to make sure of the size of the finished piece.  **Donleave them unchecked too long, as it can quickly shrink beyond what is expected!  If the machine is felting the piece unevenly, simply add friction by hand to those places that still require extra felting.  This allows better control over the felting process so that certain areas don’t felt too much.
Alternately, felting can be accomplished using a large tub filled with hot water and plenty of applied hand agitation with good success.  An ice cube tray, or a new plunger can also be used for added friction. 
Once the desired size has been achieved, rinse piece with cold water. Carefully squeeze out excess water without ringing. Roll cozy in a thick, absorbent towel.
Working while the piece is still damp, carefully stretch the sides of the panels so that they are straight and even and are at the correct measurement. Insert desired baking dish and fit the cozy to its shape (sample’s dish had handles to mold the felting around, but this was done quite easily, because the wool was still damp and pliable).  Stretch and push the piece as needed, pinning the flap in place.  Leave to dry completely.  **Note: Because felting will continue to shrink a bit as the moisture in the wool evaporates, continue shaping during the drying process, so that the project will remain in the desired shape.
 Felted Casserole Cozy-button flap

Using sharp scissors, cut a small slit in the center of the tapered point of the button flap, along the same direction as the knitting. The felting process will have firmly knotted all the fibers together, so the knitting can be cut into without worry.  If desired, the slit can be reinforced with some stitches of yarn. Stitch the button(s) onto the corresponding place on the top panel where the button flap will close, as well as anywhere else desired for decoration.

Felted Casserole Cozy-buttons,sm

To leave a question or comment for Bethany Dailey, simply add your comments to the section below! :)

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Apr 25, 2016

Double Knit 101-Part III

Double Knit 101—Part II        Double Knit 101-Part I

Elizabeth with hat:scarfShaping the Knit

Yay, you completed your double knit scarf last month! That’s really so cool, because you did the basic cast on with anchor yarn, changed stitch patterns with the Stockinette stitch and the Rib stitch. Hopefully, you finished off both ends and have it ready to wear, when needed. Well, some folks still need their warm wearables handy with the snow still flying in parts of the country.

Your current abbreviations learned are:

Stockinette stitch=St stitch, or K stitch= knit stitch. (same stitch),

Back/to/back stitch=b/b

Rib stitch=Rib stitch

Increase=inc

Decrease=dec, or DD=double dec

Cast On=CO

Bind Off=BO

Approximately=aprox

Regular row=a row with no increase or decrease

So today, I want to share with you the basics of increasing and decreasing, so you can make lots more fun items in double knit. What can we make, and when will you use the inc and dec? Let’s look at some different situations, and what will the pattern say? The best way to explain the shaping is to just make something with these techniques, for example, a hat to match your scarf.  With a double knit hat, we usually make it on a long loom so that we can get the entire length going around the head, all in one piece.  This way the cast on, with the  anchor yarn edge, will be at the top of hat, and then,  just gather the top with the anchor yarn.  But sometimes that method creates a hat that is very bunched up at the top, or sits on your head like a paper sack pulled down.

I am using the 18-All-n-One-Loom as the 10″ Knitting Board would be limited, for this example.  The All-n-One Loom has 48 pegs, and my hat will need 56 stitches.  So, we can just make this in 2 pieces, each will have 28 sts.  OH no, you say, sewing? Maybe I did it on purpose, because I wanted to show you how the invisible stitch can be just that…invisible.  So with our hat, we are going to make it in 2 shaped pieces and sew them together with invisible stitch.  Each piece will look something like this.

hat front 2

Here is the hat front or back, they will be the same.  We will start the piece at brim and work with rib stitch and stockinette.  We will do dec across the center and, on up to hat top. We will use the dec at beginning and end of each row as well as randomly across the entire row.

#5 yarn and the All-n-One Loom, set at smallest spacing is used in sample.  This will produce a size small hat to fit head circumference of approximately 21-22″.  You can make a larger hat by using the mid spacing of the All-n-One Loom.  If you are using the 28″Loom, maintain the smaller setting.  For a deeper hat, work 12 rows of rib st and 12 rows of stockinette st.  Our sample measures aprox 9″ deep.

Cast On 28 stitches in stockinette stitch.  Work in Rib stitch for 10 rows.

Change to Stockinette stitch and work for 10 rows.  For a deeper hat, change to 12 rows of each stitch.  This will add 1″ in depth.  We will go thru the series of a dec row before completing our hat panel.

pick up 3rd stitch

Decrease at ends of loom and across the loom: A basic dec is same as term (k2tog)  or knit 2 sts together as one.  This is what we are doing.  When you combine 2 sts, you are creating an empty peg and the peg next to it has 2 loops.  If you leave the pegs empty and continue weaving over them, you will create an open hole as with an eyelet design.  On the other hand, if you move the sts together and eliminate the empty peg, you are reducing the amount of stitches, and making the knit width narrower.  This is what we want to do to shape the hat around the head.

 

place on peg 4

 

 

Sometimes, you want to just bring in the ends with a dec at each end, or some shapes, like a neckline will ask you to dec at just the front end, or back end of loom.  When you want a more sharp curve like our hat, we will use some dec rows that will have multiple decreases all across the knitting.  It all does the same thing-make the knit smaller in width.Remember, the dec stitches must be done to both boards for a basic process.

We have created empty pegs on both boards by moving loop on peg 2 to peg 3.  It is always best to do a dec or inc from inside the knit rather than at the first stitch.  There will be times when you will work from peg one, but that is usually for ruffles and intricate little items.

ready to close in open pegs

 

 

 

 

create open pegs for dec

Once you have all the open pegs you need to reduce the size of the knit, start at center of loom and move the pegs over towards center.  If you are working with an empty peg that has the 2 loops, be sure to move both of them to next peg.  Sometime there will be more than one peg to jump over, and it will be a tight stretch.  Just go slow and careful, so that the loops are on the intended pegs.

In the photo above, you can see 6 empty pegs on each board.  They are ready to be moved over.  They all need to be adjacent to each other in order to weave the next (shorter) row.  After this row is complete, you will have just 22 sts instead of the 28 sts that you cast on.  Be sure to weave over all pegs to complete the row.

pick up both loops and move over

It can be a bit of a stretch as you move the loops over to close in the empty pegs.  Once they are all moved, weave over the pegs and hook over, being careful to lift both loops when working  the double loops.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eyelets

 

Remember, if you leave the loops spaced out, and weave over them, without moving them together, you will create eyelets.

 

 

 

 

Continue the shaping of the hat: We are working from L side of loom.

Decrease row #1-Lift loop #3 and place it on peg #4, both boards.  Place loop #8 onto peg #9, both boards.  Place loop #13 onto peg #14, both boards.  Notice they are all laying towards center.  Now, place loop #16 onto peg #15, both boards, and loop #21 onto peg #20, and then loop #26 onto peg #25, both boards.  Your dec is done.  Now, carefully move the loops over until they are all adjacent to each other and you now have 22 sts.  Check carefully to be sure you do not have empty pegs.  Sometimes, when moving the double loops on one peg, it helps to move one at a time, so you don’t accidentally lose one of them.  Weave over the 22 sts and hook over.

22 sts after dec.2

Work 2 regular rows in stockinette.

Dec #2-Lift loop #3 onto peg #4 on both boards.  Do this to both ends of loom.  You are dec by 2 sts.

Work 4 regular rows in stockinette.

Dec #3- Lift loop #4 onto peg #5 and loop # 9 onto peg #10.  Do this to both boards.  Lift loop #17 onto peg #16, and loop #12 onto #11.  Do this to both boards.  We are decreasing by 4 stitches.  Now there are 16 sts on loom.

Work 2 regular rows in stockinette.

Repeat dec row #2.  Work 1 regular row.

Repeat dec row #2 again.  Work 1 reg row.

Dec #4-decrease by 3 sts.  Lift loop #3 onto peg #4, both boards, both ends, and one dec in center of knitting.  There are 9 sts remaining.   Work 1 reg row.

Repeat dec row #4-so that you now have 6 sts remaining.  Work 1 reg row.

Dec 1 st at each end of loom on both boards.  Work 1 reg row.

Dec 1 st at each end of loom on both boards, and bind off the last sts.  THIS PIECE IS DONE.

Now, make a 2nd piece exactly the same-it will go so much faster than the first.

 

ready to put togetherYou now need to sew them together using the invisible stitch.  If you look at the outer edges of the hat pieces, you will see where you want to do the sewing-right on the outer edge, so that you can just pull the pieces together.  I like to pin the pieces in place before beginning.  You can do this with some nice smooth double pointed knitting needles, or, find some very smooth toothpicks.

 

 

pinned together for sewing

 

Do the sewing with matching yarn, aprox 3′ long.  Use a darning needle to make the stitches.  The yarn used in the sample is a contrast color yarn.  This was done on purpose, so you can see the stitches, and then see how it disappears once pulled snug into the knitting.

The bind off of each piece can be done before the sewing, and remove the anchor yarn, or you can leave them in until after the sewing.  I will use this method, so we can have one continuous bind off all around the hat.

Start sewing at one corner of hat at anchor yarn by simply tying the yarn about 1″ from bottom edge.  Bring yarn up thru the knit to the starting point for sewing.

 

edges to be sewn

This is ready to sew together.  With darning needle, start on one edge and grab the cross stitch inside the edge.  Without pulling it tight, grab the cross stitch inside other edge.  Keep following the seam by alternating from one edge to the other.  After working for about 2″, you can gently pull the working yarn to bring the 2 edges together.  See the pale yellow yarn sewn loosely, and then see how it totally disappears in the next photo.You can gently shape the top of the hat to be rounded or flat across the top, just with the sewing.

 

stitching

invisible sewing.2

 

Once you have sewn the hats pieces together, you are ready to do a nice finish on the hat brim. This will be a simple crochet bind off as shown in Part I of Double Knit 101. The bind off will connect the 2 pieces with a seamless finished edge.  Remove the 2 anchor yarns.  Weave in any yarn tails, trim excess and your hat is ready to wear.  Add adornments if desired, like a little round flower.

Basic Increase preview-Making a circle.

circle

Cast On 3 sts stockinette. Place anchor yarn.

Work 1 reg row.

Inc from st #1 to peg #2, both ends and both boards. Work row.

Work 1 reg row.

Continue with inc row, now moving stitch #2 to peg #3, and 1 regular row until you have 13 stitches.

Work 2 reg rows.

Inc row, continue till you have 15 sts.

Work 3 regular rows.

Complete in reverse using the dec instead of inc.

Keep working until you are back to 3 sts.

Bind off at both anchor, and loom.

So how is the basic Inc done in double knit?  Pretty much like the Dec except move the 1st stitch out to new empty peg.  You have an empty peg between st 1 and st 2.  Instead, pick up the loop behind the adjacent peg (this is the last row dropped off) of peg #3.  Place that loop onto the empty peg.  You now have a new stitch on that empty peg.  If you do this to both sides and both ends, your next row will have 2 more stitches. With 5 stitches, now do the inc rows from stitch #2 to peg #3.

Cast on 3 sts.     Move stitch #1 to new peg creating empty peg.  Same on both boards and at both ends.

caston 3 sts

move 2 peg out2

 

 

 

Now you see row with 7 stitches.  We are lifting the loop from the previous row to place on the empty peg for the new stitch.  Next photo shows the new stitches.  Weave this row and hook over.

We can go into more detail for the inc process next month, when we will be talking about some color additions, and intarsia designs.  We will want to cover buttonholes, for sure.  After that some new exciting stitches.  Join us here!inc to empty peg

stitch to pick up

6 Comments

  • Pat,
    Another great article. Really like the explanation of he invisible stitch. That is the only stitch I use when sewing together items. Am looking forward to next article when you talk about Intarsia design, a favorite topic and one people like to learn. Thanks for sharing your wealth of knowledge with everyone.

  • Thank you, Sue. I agree with the sewing stitch-it seems to work in so many situations. Pat

  • I love these tutorials. That circle would be great to make the bottom of a knitted bag.

  • Hi Claudia, that’s a great idea. How about the bottom of a basket or cup holder, even a knitting board bag. Thanks, Pat

  • Awesome tutorial! While I didn’t make the hat (yet), I did use it to make the top of a hanging towel and it worked great. Thank you so much! I looked at other tutorials and they just didn’t explain it the way you did, you made it so easy. I agree with you and Claudia, a basket would be fun to make.

  • Hi Jen, That’s a super use of creating a circular piece-I hadn’t thought of that. Great creative idea. Pat

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Apr 23, 2016

Oven Mitt & Hot pad Set

Oven Mitt Set Small 2

Add a special touch to your kitchen with a set of customized oven mitt set. Makes and excellent hostess gift too! Worked in garter stitch and felted to provide the user with a thick fabric that will keep the heat away from the fingers. 

LOOM:  Hat Loom, at large gauge (40 pegs and 20 pegs)

YARN:  Approx 300 yds of bulky weight of wool mohair blend.  Shown in Cranberry Swirl (250 yds) and Lime Sorbet (50 yds)

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

GAUGE: Approx 3.5 sts x 4 rows = 2 inches (gauge not imperative).

SIZE:
Hot pad: Before felting 10×10 inches. After felting 8.5 x 8.5 inches.
Oven Mitt: Before felting 14×8 inches. After felting 12 x 7 inches.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

ewrap k=ewrap knit

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)
MC=Main color (cranberry swirl)

CC=Contrasting color (lime sorbet)

PATTERN NOTE: Both items are worked completely with the ewrap knit stitch.

INSTRUCTIONS

Hot PadHot Pad

Set knitting loom XS setting-with pegs every other hole, 28 pegs.

Using MC, CO 28 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1: e-wrap k to the end of row.

Row 2: p to the end of row.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: until item measures approximately 9.5 inches from cast on edge.

Bind off with basic bind off method.

Accent I-cordHot Pad with Icord

Using CC, CO 3 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Work a 3-stitch i-cord that is approx. 45 inches long.

Assembly: using the mattress stitch, seam the icord to the edge of the hot pad. Create a small loop with the remaining icord (to use for hanging)

Oven Mitt

Set knitting loom Medium setting-with pegs every other hole, 40 pegs. 

Using MC, CO 40 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1: ewrap k to the end of rnd.

Rnd 2: p to the end of rnd. 

Rep Rnd 1 and Rnd 2: 15 more times (total of 30 rnds). (16 garter stitch ridges).Oven Mitt parts

BO 8sts, ewrap k to the end of row (32 sts). (Working in rows for the next 5 rows)

Next row: p back (p32).

Next row: Ewrap k to the end (32 sts).

Next row: p back (p32).

Next row: Ewrap k to the end (32 sts).

Next row: p back (p32).

Next row: Ewrap k to the end, CO 8 sts at end of row. (Begin working the rnd again).

Next rnd: p to end of rnd.

*Next rnd: ewrap k to end of rnd.

Next rnd: p to end of rnd. *Oven Mitt assembled

Rep from * to *: 14 more times. (total of 28 rnds). (16 garter stitch ridges from thumb opening).

Bind off with gather removal method.

Thumb 

Set knitting loom XS setting-with pegs every other hole, 28 pegs.

Using MC, CO 28 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1: k to end of rnd.

Rnd 2: p to end of rnd.

Rep Rnd 1 and Rnd 2: 11 more times. (total of 22 rnds). (12 garter stitch ridges.

Bind off with gather removal method. 

Assembly of Oven Mitt: Using the mattress stitch and MC, seam the thumb to the thumb opening in the thumb.

Accent I-cord 

Using CC, CO 3 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Work a 3-stitch i-cord that is approx. 25  inches long.

Assembly: using the mattress stitch, seam the icord to the cast on edge of the oven mitt. Create a small loop with the remaining icord (to use for hanging)

FELTING INSTRUCTIONS side view

The magic in this knitting happens when you wash the untreated wool with hot water and the item shrinks, making the stitches smaller, and the fabric thicker.

You will need the following:

1 pillow case with a zipper

Safety Pin

2-3 jeans (to use in agitation)

Eucalan Woolwash or Baby Shampoo

Towels (to squeeze out excess water).

Top Loader Washer

INSTRUCTIONS

Place all items to be felted inside the zippered pillow case. Secure the zipper with the safety pin (to ensure the pillow case doesn’t open).

Set washer to Small load, and Hot temperature.

Place 1 tsp of Eucalan Woolwash or 1 tsp of Baby Shampoo.

Place the jeans inside the washer.

Place the pillow case inside the washer.

Start the washer. Check the washer again BEFORE it goes into the spin cycle. If the item is not the desired size, re-start the washer from the beginning (simply turn the knob back to the beginning of the wash). Place the pillow case back in the washer and let it go through another cycle, stopping the washer BEFORE it was through the spin cycle. Check again. If not desired size, repeat. *The above samples took 3 cycles.

Once the items are the desired size, remove the items from the pillow case. Take them to the sink. If you used Eucalan Woolwash, rinsing is not required. If you used Baby Shampoo, rinse in cold water. Do not wring the excess water. Place a towel on a flat surface, then place the felted item on top of the towel. Pat dry as much as you can.

Set the items to air dry, away from the sun. The sun may discolor the yarn.

 

 

 

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Apr 16, 2016

Nautical Dishcloth Set

nautical set 3

This month we will bring you small accents to decorate your kitchen, anywhere from dishclothes, hanging towels, to placemats and perhaps even a kitchen rug. The Nautical Dishcloth set is the perfect way to add some color and to test out some new stitches. Remember, it is a dishcloth so perfection is not required, the dishes won’t mind if a stitch is amiss. Grab a loom and sit down outside to enjoy the spring air and knit away.

Knitting Loom: 32 peg Basics Loom

Yarn: Approx 150 grams of cotton worsted weight yarn. Bernat Handicrafter Cotton in Nautical was used in sample.

Notions: knitting tool, tapestry needle

Gauge: Not imperative for project.

Sizes: Squares: 8×8”  | Dotted: 7.5×7.5”  | Scrubbie: 6.5×6.5”

Abbreviations:

K=knit stitch (or may substitute with U-stitch).

P=purl stitch

St(s)=stitch(es)

Rep=Repeat

Sl 1 wyif=with yarn in front of the stitch (remove stitch from the peg, pass working yarn behind the peg, place stitch back on the peg, then work the next peg as instructed in pattern.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Squares DishclothSquares

Cast on 32 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1 (from right to left): p to end of row.

Row 2: k to end of row.

Row 3: p to end of row.

Row 4: k to end of row.

Row 5: p to end of row.

Row 6: k to end of row.

Row 7: p3, k13, p16.

Rep Row 6 and Row 7: 10 more times (total of 20 rows).

Next row (left to right): k to end of row.

Next row: p16, k13, p3

Rep last two rows: 10 more times (total of 20 rows).

Next row: k to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Rep last 2 rows: 2 more times.

Remove with Basic bind off method.

 

Dotted DishclothDotted

Cast on 32 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1 (from right to left): p to end of row.

Row 2: k to end of row.

Row 3: p to end of row.

Row 4: k to end of row.

Row 5: p to end of row.

Row 6: k3, *k2, p1; rep from * to last 5 sts, k5.

Row 7: p3, k to last 3 sts,  p3.

Rep Rows 6 and 7: 18 more times (36 total rows).

Next row: k to the end row.

Next row: p to the end of row.

Rep last two rows: 2 more times.

Remove with Basic bind off method.

 

Scrubbie DishclothScrubbie

Row 1 (from right to left): p to end of row.

Row 2: k to end of row.

Row 3: p to end of row.

Row 4: k to end of row.

Row 5: p to end of row.

Row 6: k to end of row.

Row 7: p3, *k1, sl 1 wyif, rep from * to last 4 sts, k1, p3.

Rep Rows 6 and 7: 18 more times (36 total rows).

Next row: k to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Rep last two rows: 2 more times.

Remove with Basic bind off method.

 

 

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Apr 11, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Primrose

Whimsical Loom Knits – April 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

IMG_3500

Celebrate the arrival of Spring with this sweet little flower.  This fun project is a quick and easy way to use up small yarn remnants from other projects.  Use these pretty blossoms to embellish anything from hats, hair bows, headbands, afghan squares, refrigerator magnets, wreaths, etc.  

Knitting Loom: Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Approximately 5 yards of worsted weight yarn.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle.

Gauge: Not critical for this project.

Finished Measurements: about 2″ diameter

Abbreviations:
K: knit
M1: make 1 (to increase)
K2Tog: knit 2 together (to decrease)

 

Instructions

Cast on 3 stitches.

Rows 1-2:  K3.

Row 3:  M1, K3.

Row 4:  K4.

Row 5:  M1, K4.

Rows 6-7:  K5.

Row 8:  K2, K2Tog, K1.

Row 9:  K1, K2tog, K1.

Row 10:  K3.

Row 11:  Using the basic bind off method, bind off 2 stitches.  (One stitch will remain on the loom.)

Row 12:  Skip the stitch on the loom and cast on 2 new stitches.

The first petal of the flower is now complete.  Repeat rows 1-12 until you have a total of 4 petals.

Repeat rows 1-10 once more.  Bind off all stitches, leaving a long yarn end.

The knitted piece will look similar to this:

IMG_3488

 

Finishing

Thread the long yarn end into the yarn needle.  Work a running stitch along the full length at the base of the petals.

IMG_3490

Pull the yarn end to tightly gather the center of the flower.  Use the yarn end to join the base of the last petal to the base of the first petal.

IMG_3491

Weave in the yarn ends and the little flower is done!

 

Check this out – Try this project out in a super fine or fingering weight yarn.  Use the same loom and follow the pattern as written for a slightly more delicate flower:

IMG_3486

Happy Spring!

 

4 Comments

  • How on earth do you knit the hoxey cowl please share the method.
    Desparet to learn.

  • Hello Maureen. I see that this is a pattern from Interweave Knits. Have you tried sending a message to Interweave Knits, or to the designer of the Hoxey Cowl?

  • Hello. This is a random question, but do you sell any of your work? If so, how to you calculate the price of each piece? Thanks.

  • I calculate my work per hour. If I design the item, I calculate a design fee, then if I have to knit the item, I charge a set fee per hour. Consequently, my knitted items have a design fee+knitting fee+yarn cost.

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Apr 4, 2016

Stitchology 20 : Spring Bunnies Stitch

Spring Bunnies Square

I’ve been pleased as punch with the way this month’s stitch turned out…so sweet!  There’s something special about the pairing of bunnies and spring, and this new stitch exemplifies them both quite nicely. :)  Wouldn’t this be a fantastic  stitch for a little girl’s jumper, or a baby layette? There is a bit of an unusual method for working the bunny ears, but it really is very simple to do.  I have included a tutorial video for this one, since the technique may be new to you.  Let’s dive in and learn this pretty design while whipping up an afghan square…

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)  To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Spring Bunnies Square

 

Spring Bunnies close up

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage sakura)

Notions: Loom tool, crochet hook, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 8—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

*All yarn overs (yo) for this stitch are completed by e-wrapping the peg.

*For ease in reading the pattern’s directions below, the steps  involving eyelets are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two pegs.

There are two types of decreases for creating the eyelets in this pattern: the Knit 2 Together (k2tog) for a right leaning decrease worked as a knit, and the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) for a left leaning decrease worked as a knit. The following dictates how to work these stitches as you will find them in the stitch pattern:

[k2tog, yo]:  Work over 2 pegs: Move the loop from the yo peg to the k2tog peg. Using the working yarn, u-stitch knit the k2tog peg, knitting off the 2 loops as one, and then e-wrap the empty yo peg.

[yo, ssk]: Work over 2 pegs: Move the loop from the yo peg to the ssk peg. Using the working yarn, e-wrap empty yo peg, then u-stitch knit the ssk peg, knitting off the bottom 2 loops as one.

Making the Bunny Ears:

Where you see the symbol in the below charts for “Make new drop loop”, this is the peg which the bunny ears will be created and secured.  The steps to do so are as follows: (The “bunny ears” pegs are worked from right to left, with the numbers in this direction: 1, 2, 3, 4.)

—Knit the first 2 pegs of the 4 bunny ears pegs (pegs 4 & 3).

—Insert a crochet hook between pegs 2 & 3 of the 4 and poke it through the eyelet directly below.

—Wrap WY around crochet hook and pull a new loop though the eyelet and out the front of the pegs.

—Lift the loop 3 and pass newly made loop behind the peg.  Replace the loop 3.

—Lift the loop 4 and pass the right side of the newly made loop over the peg.  Replace the loop 4.  Cinch newly made loop in, but not too tightly.

—Knit pegs 2 & 1 of the 4.

—Again insert the crochet hook between pegs 2 & 3 and poke it through the same eyelet directly below.

—Wrap WY around crochet hook and pull a new loop through the eyelet and out the front of the pegs.

—Lift the loop 2 and pass newly made loop behind the peg.  Replace loop 2.

—Lift the loop 1 and pass the left side of the newly made loop over the peg. Replace the loop 1.  Cinch newly made loop in, but not too tightly.

—Continue with the rest of the row.

—The next row will work all pegs 1 and 4 of the bunny ears pegs as 2 over 1.  Make sure that these 2 pegs are worked without much tension throughout.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

Row 1: p1, , k2, p1, k2tog, yo, yo, ssk.

Row 2: k8.

Row 3: k4, make a new drop loop (see above instructions in Pattern Notes), k2, make a new drop loop.

Row 4: k8, working drop loop pegs as 2 over 1.

Row 5: k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, p1, k2, p1.

Row 6: k8.

Row 7: make a new drop loop, k2, make a new drop loop, k4.

Row 8: k8, working drop loop pegs as 2 over 1.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

 

Bunny Ears Square

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

 

Spring Bunnies Square angle

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p38.

Row 2: k38.

Row 3: p38.

Row 4: k38.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5:  p2, k5, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, k4, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 6:  k38.

Row 7:  p2, k5, *make a new drop loop, k2, make a new drop loop, k4, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 8: k38, working drop loop pegs as 2 over 1.

Row 9: p2, k1, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, p1, k2, p1, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 10: k38.

Row 11: p2, k1, *make a new drop loop, k2, make a new drop loop, k4, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 12: repeat Row 8.

Row 13: p2, k1, *p1, k2, p1, k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 14: k38.

Rows 15-54: repeat Rows 7-14.

Rows 55-59: repeat Rows 7-11.

Finishing Rows

Row 60: k38.

Row 61: p38.

Row 62: k38.

Row 63: p38.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

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Mar 28, 2016

Double Knit 101-Part II

Check out DOUBLE KNIT Part I for beginning of the series.

IMG_1791 (2)

Double Knit made simple, part II. Last month, we began with an overview of what double knit is and, why it works so well. Today…how to get started with the double knit basic cast on, and then cover some basic stitches. We will get into colorwork and cables in a few months.

For illustration, we are workng on the 10” Knitting Board and have it set for 2cm spacing between the pegs from rail to rail. This is the mid spacing on the wood blocks.  This loom has 24 double pegs, but we are going to use 14 stitches for illustration. Place cast on in the center of loom. I have chosen a pretty yarn  in #5 weight, Big Twists Yarn in 100% acrylic. This is a 2 ply yarn and works well in loom knitting.

Remember that in double knit, we want to use both sides of the loom, so that our resulting knit is interlocked.

Let’s begin…Place slip knot on the first peg on the back board.  When we refer to first stitch, it is the first stitch used for the cast on, not always the first on the board.

Back Board

slip knot start

Front Board

We are doing the basic wrap for cast on.   From the first peg on back board, wrap the 2nd peg on front board.  Wrap across the loom and skip every other peg.  Continue until you have the amount of stitches desired. Wrap around the end pegs, and work back to first peg, covering all skipped pegs.  You will end at peg on front board directly across from first peg.

You now have a ‘full circular’ on the loom.  You are ready to place an anchor yarn.

stockinette weave3

 

The anchor yarn is not a requirement, but you will see how easily it makes the first row, and controls all the stitches. Most times the anchor yarn will be removed when you get done with the knitting, and you will finish off the cast on stitches with a nice crochet edge. Other times, the anchor yarn stays in and becomes a drawstring to gather the stitches together like in the crown of a hat. It is also useful to help pull down the first few rows of knitting and keep the tension even. A pattern will tell you when to use a contrast color of yarn for the anchor since it will be removed, or, to use a matching yarn that will remain in the knitting for another use.

lay anchor2

You will notice that the anchor yarn only covers the stitch area and the ends drop down between the boards.  It works best if you make it long enough to tie under the board.  This way, it is not accidentally pulled out.

At this point, you are ready to add another row of weaving. Work it just like you did the first row.  Wrap the first peg and down the the 2nd peg on front board and continue across the stitches wrapping every other peg.  Turn around at end, and wrap the pegs going back towards first peg.  There will now be 2 loops on each peg, and the anchor yarn is between. Let the anchor yarn assist you when you ‘hook over’ this cast on row.  Hooking over is just the term used to describe the action of lifting the bottom loop over the top.  See below.

 

stockinette over anchor2

 

 

 

 

 

caston_row2

 

 

 

 

 

With knit hook, lift bottom loops over top loops and off pegs.  Take loop up and over, and drop it off of peg.  You will do the ‘hook over’ on all stitches on both boards.  Hint:  In order to keep the sides of the knit even, do the hook over as in the photos from Left side of knit to about center of the stitches.  Then go to the Right side of knit and work to the center, so that all pegs are completed.  Just vary the center point, so that you do not create a line in the knit. This will keep edges even. Work pegs on other side of loom also.

Hooking over1f

hooking over3f

After you do the ‘hook over’ on all stitches, you can just push them down in center between the boards, and pull down gently on the anchor yarn.  Your stitches are now Cast On.  You are ready to work in Stockinette or Rib stitch, or any other that you will learn.

Stockinette stitch:  This is the basic stitch and forms a smooth knit on both sides.  It is done exactly like the weave of the cast on row.

The Rib stitch:  To create a rib pattern, the weave is just slightly different.  Let’s look at the cream yarn to see the difference.  Wrap the back board on first peg and then down to the 3rd peg on front board.  You can see the angle is more extreme than with stockinette.  You are working from peg 1 to peg 3 by skipping the first 2 pegs on front board. Continue with this angle and wrap every other peg to end of knit.  Wrap the yarn around the end pegs and return.  The first stitch is consecutive with the end pegs.  Then you will be working all empty pegs.

full rib weave

 

 

return weave rib2

 

 

As you return to first peg, you will see that you are still working from peg 1 to peg 3, and then, every other.  The first 2 pegs will be wrapped consecutively.  Just be sure to cover all pegs. You will also notice that you are working at opposite angle with the weaving.  This is what creates the ribs.  You will find as you work the stitch pattern, your stitches will create pairs of  stitches for each rib.

Once you get back to the first stitch, all pegs should have 2 loops.  The ‘hook over’ process is the same as the Stockinette stitch.  Continue with the Rib weave as long as desired or according to your pattern.

Back to Back Stitch:  Sometimes, you want to just add a few stitches for accent or make the entire knitted piece in a simple stitch referred to as the Back to Back stitch.  It takes only one pass of the loom for each row.  Just weave front to back on the pegs of each stitch.

b_b weave2

The finished knit will look similar to the Stockinette, but may be a bit looser.  We will use it later, in color work.

 

 

 

 

BIND OFF: So enough for our basic stitches, let’s learn how to take the knit off the loom, Bind Off.  We need to bind off at the loom, and then, at the anchor yarn of the Cast On stitches.

bind off loomStart on the end of the loom opposite the yarn, or the back end.  You can go ahead and cut the yarn leaving a few inches of ‘yarn tail’.  The yarn tail is usually about 3-4″ long and will be used to knot the last stitch.

Insert the crochet hook into the first stitch on back board.  Lift it off the loom.  Then, pick up the first stitch on the front board.  You have 2 loops on the crochet hook.  Pull the loop closest to the hook thru the other loop.  Now pick up the next loop on the back board.  Pull the loop closest to hook thru the other loop.  Pick up the next loop from the front board.  Pull one thru one.  Continue this process, alternating front board and back board until you have the last loop on the hook.  Now, you are at that yarn tail, so you can pull it thru the last loop and gently tighten.

Now, we are looking at Cast On stitches with the anchor yarn.  We want to put a nice even finish on this end also.

anchor in cast on

bind off anchor2

 

 

 

 

 

Start at end opposite the yarn tail.  Pick up just the first 2 loops.  Pull the loop closest to the hook thru the other loop, just as you did on the loom Bind Off.  Continue across the knit until you reach the last loop and use the yarn tail to knot the edge.

bind off anchor

 

 

You can just use your fingers to assist with moving one loop on the crochet hook thru the other loop.

 

 

Once the ends of your scarf are finished with the Crochet Bind Off, just weave the yarn tails into the knit.  Take the crochet hook up thru the 2 layers of knit so that the hook comes out close to yarn tail.  Draw the  yarn into the knit, carefully, so that even the knot is tucked away, out of sight.  Then just remove the crochet hook by taking it out the end with the hook.  This way, you will not snag the knit.

yarn tail

With what you have learned about double knit, you can create your first completed item. YAY!!  How about using the stitches to do a new scarf.

SIMPLE SCARF

Get loom and yarn, knit hook, and crochet hook in hand.  Cast on 14 stitches in Stockinette stitch, add anchor yarn, and continue for about 12 rows.  Then with no change of pace, just start the next row in Rib stitch.  Work in Rib stitch for 12 rows.  Then start next row in Stockinette stitch.  On and on you will go, until you look down and have a great scarf.  You may decide to work the scarf using 20 or 22 stitches.  That’s your choice.  Then bind off stitches at both ends.

rib_stockinette scarf

 

Now, let’s look at how our two stitches look as a stitch pattern.  Remember, our stitch pattern was 12 rows of Stockinette stitch, 12 rows of Rib stitch, and repeating all the way down.  A scarf can be made as long as desired and this one could be really long if you used a full skein (ball) of yarn and knit it with just 14 stitches.  Or maybe you decided to make it wider and shorter.  That’s the fun of being creative with our double knit.

The photo (below) shows the double knit edge of the scarf.  It is always easy to count your completed rows by counting the stitches along the outer edge. The next photo (below) shows how to pick up the horizontal cross stitch on the edge of double knit when you want to sew 2 edges together with an invisible stitch.  We will cover both of these topics next month along with some increase and decrease techniques to add shape to the knit.  HAPPY KNITTING!

edge of scarf_arrow

Edge of Knitted Scarf

edge cross stitch

Side of Knitted Scarf

13 Comments

  • Both links went to lesson part 2, (even the one that was meant to be for part 1!) but I missed part 1 and could not find out how to find it. Is it possible to send the correct link please?

  • Thanks, I have now found part 1 on the website, even though the link in the email goes to part 2.

  • Here is the link for Part I:

    http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/5174

  • I wonder if the “Back to Back” stich is the one that has the same effect than knitting flat.

  • I too would like the lesson 1..I have been gone and I do have the board and all I need to do this. Thankyou, Joann

  • Hi Jane, sorry for the error. We have added a link for Part I on the page of part II. So once you go to the new part II, you will see the link to click on Part I. Thanks for your patience. Pat

  • Hi, see the link to part I when you view part II. thanks, Pat

  • Thank you, We have added it to the part II also.

  • Pat, once again, great article on double knit. I hope with all your clear and excellent instructions that folks will get excited about double knit as well as single. Both are exciting and offer so much variety to the knitter on the knitting boards. Thanks again for sharing your wealth of knowledge with us all!!

  • Thanks Sue. You are such a fabulous double knitter, yourself. Please add any other thoughts to share with us, if you’d like. Pat

  • Hi Guys :)
    Link to the squares isn’t working:
    To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

  • Hi Kim-I will check it out-thank you so much for the heads-up. Pat

  • Hi Kim and Pat :)

    Just wanted to let you know that the link error is now corrected. It occurred when the categories for the site were changed. ;) Thanks for letting us know, Kim!

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Mar 25, 2016

Spring Mountain Shawl

Designed by Bethany A Dailey

bethany_shawl

With the first seasonal turns of winter into spring, warming winds wrap themselves around mountain peaks, sending waters of thawing snow caps cascading downwards into the welcoming valleys below. The craggy rocks beneath the crests begin to peek out through the ice and snow, bringing with them the hope of wildflowers and new life after the season of cold.  This asymmetrical shawl embodies this feeling of winter giving way to spring…a little bit blanketed, a little bit revealed, just like those thawing mountain peaks.

Knitting Loom: Zippy Loom, 20 pegs used.

Yarn: Approximately 465 yards of bulky weight yarn, two strands held as one. Sample used Charisma Tweed (5 skeins in the color Gray) 93 yds/85 m.

Notions: knitting tool, 6mm crochet hook (for cast on and help with possible missed stitches, etc), stitch markers, scissors, knitting pins, yarn needle, row counter, one or two large decorative buttons.

Gauge: Approx 3 sts x 1.75 rows= 4 inches (in Figure Eight Stitch) **Note: This is a very stretchy stitch, so all measurements are approximate.

Finished Measurements: Width from neck to elbow: 15″, Length before seaming: 74″, Length at longest point while worn: 36″  (The size of this shawl can easily be adjusted by changing the number of pegs used and rows knitted.)

Skills Needed: E-wrap, Figure Eight Stitch, Chain CO (or CO of your choice), Basic BO, seaming method of choice.

Abbreviations:
CO: cast on
EW: E-wrap stitch
KO: knit off
WY: working yarn
BO: bind off

Pattern Notes:
This pattern uses 2 strands of yarn held throughout.

*Create the Figure Eight Stitch (in single knitting):

  • —To begin, wrap around the outside of peg 1, then around peg 2 as if to EW. Your WY will travel in a sort of figure 8 motion, hence the name of the stitch. KO these 2 pegs.
  • —Carrying the yarn behind peg 2, wrap around peg 3 as if to EW, then back around peg 2. KO these 2 pegs.
  • —Carrying the yarn behind peg 3, wrap around peg 4 as if to EW, then back around peg 3.  KO these 2 pegs.
  • —Continue in this manner to the end of the row.

See tutorial video for more details:

Instructions

Set loom to work in a flat panel using 20 pegs.  CO onto all 20 pegs. (Sample used Chain CO)

Rows 1-52:  Work Figure Eight Stitch on all 20 pegs.

**Note: Due to the loose nature of this stitch, when adding a new skein, tie the end of the WY and the beginning of the new skein securely into a square knot.  Thread one of the tails onto a yarn needle and work into the strands of the WY at one side of the knot, parting the plies in the yarn to help the end remain secure.  Repeat for the 2nd tail. 

Loosely BBO all 20 pegs.

Finishing

Being careful not to pull too tightly which will cause puckering, neatly stitch the inside edges of the panel together, starting at the bottom edges, for approximately 21″ (sample uses the mattress stitch). Stitch the button(s) in place as desired onto the back side of the remaining opening.

Weave in all ends and block lightly as desired.

To leave a question or comment for Bethany Dailey, simply add your comments to the section below! :)

Figure Eight Stitch on Zippy

13 Comments

  • Is there any audio with the video on the figure 8 stitch on the zippy?

  • Nope. I figured it was very self explanatory without any verbal explanation. ;)

  • Hi thanks so much for this pattern, it’s beautiful and it is just the type of shawl that I love. I looked everywhere for a airy type of Shawl pattern a beginner can do and this is perfect. I also wanted to tell Gin that if you check out YouTube you can find verbal institutions to the figure 8 stitch. :)

  • Hi Britt! :) Thank you so much for your lovely comment…I’m so glad you like it!

  • Do you use the figure 8cast on?

  • I actually used the Chain Cast On. :)

  • Thank you Bethany I can not ain’t to get started I am a beginner and hope I will be able to make this beautiful shawl Again thanks a million

  • You are so welcome, Gin…any time! :) I believe that you will have great success with this one, as it is really just the same stitch repeated throughout…perfect for a beginner loomer. Enjoy!

  • I have another dumb question Sorry about this but is this worked on 5 zippys without any corner piece. I don’t know the video shows the corners and I am new to this looming

  • You can choose your own configuration of 20 pegs, as it is worked as a flat panel…can be 5 Zippys on a line or 4 Zippys and 4 corners. ;)

  • Thanks again for the help

  • Beautiful pattern intro, Bethany! The shawl is lovely, too – and Emily is just as pretty as can be :)

  • Oh, thank you so much, Jenny! :D That is so sweet to hear!

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