Jul 29, 2016

NEW Pattern Kits with Red Heart Yarns!

redheart_kb_banner

 

is partnering with 
to bring great yarns and NEW PATTERN KITS to KB looms!

We’re excited to Partner with Red Heart Yarns, one of the most widely-recognized brands in the USA. Red Heart is the Winner of the Women’s Choice Award  and voted the most recommended yarn brand. Red Heart yarn has been the choice of millions of crocheters and knitters for more than 80 years. Now we are bringing the Best of Red Heart to you!

Yarn_BannerBlog3_071716

Also check out the New Pattern Kits! It’s one stop shopping. The kits include all yarn needed for each project, downloadable pattern, and a knitting loom.  Our initial kit offerings include a baby blanket, large afghan, 2 shawls and 2 fun summer socks. Our design team worked hard to create these beautiful knits. (Simply click on the photo to view all kits).  We hope you enjoy!
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Jul 17, 2016

Trellis Headband

 

Trellis-Headband-683x1024Summertime is here and with it the promises of hiking through the high mountain tops and discovering new streams and meadows. Keep your hair in check with the trellis headband that blends in with the foliage. 

LOOM:  All-n-One Loom (25 pegs)

YARN:  Approx  60 yds of worsted weight merino wool.  Knit Picks Preciosa Tonal in Tadpole was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

GAUGE: 20 sts x 17 rows = 4”

SIZE:  16.5” long (plus the icords) x 5″ wide

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

k2tog=knit two stitches together

ssk=slip, slip, knit

CDD=Centered double decrease

rem=remaining

yo=yarn over (ewrap the empty peg, on next row, undo ewrap and place this strand of yarn in front of the peg and treat it as a stitch)

INSTRUCTIONSTrellis-Headband-2-683x1024

Set knitting loom with the spacers at opposite ends–you will be using 25 pegs.

Cast on 25 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1 (going from right to left (clockwise) on the loom): k to the end of row.

Row 2: p to the end of row.

Row 3: k2, k1, *yo, k3, CDD, k3, yo, k1; rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 4 (and all even rows): p2, k to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 5, 7, 9: Rep Row 3.

Row 11, 13, 15, 17: k2, k2tog, *k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, CDD; rep from * to last 11 sts, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k2.

Row 18: p2, k to last 2 sts, p2.

Repeat Rows 3 to 18 until piece measures 12” from CO edge.

Next row: k to end.

Next row: p to end.

**Next row: k1, k2tog, k to last 3 sts, ssk, k1.

Next row: p to end of row.Trellis Headband Back

Rep last 2 rows until 5 sts rem.

On rem 5 sts, work a 5 st icord that is 8 inches in length. Bind off. Weave ends in. **

On the cast on edge, pick up 25 stitches and place them back on the knitting loom.

Rep from ** to **.

Block lightly.

 

Need extra assistance with the lace rows? We’ve got you covered! Keep reading below for extra assistance.

Continue reading »

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Jul 11, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Vignette

Whimsical Loom Knits – July 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

This pretty bookmark is designed to resemble a curving, twining vine.  The pattern name, Vignette, was chosen because the word originated from the Middle French word, vignete, the diminutive form of the noun vigne, which means “vine.” In English, the word was first used in the mid-18th century for a design or illustration that ran along the border of a page, or one that marked the beginning or end of a chapter. The designs often looked like little vines.  Knit this charming bookmark to mark your page in your favorite book. 

IMG_3578

Knitting Loom: 11 peg loom rail from the KB Hat Loom

Yarn: Approximately 12 yards of a light fingering weight yarn.  1 mini skein of Lion Brand Bonbons was used for the sample.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle,

Gauge: Not critical for this project.

Finished Measurements: Approximately 2” wide by 8.5” in length

Abbreviations:

K – Knit

K2tog – Knit 2 together (decrease)

M1 – Make 1 (increase)

P2tog – Purl 2 together (decrease)

Sl 1 – Slip 1

 

Pattern Notes: For the purposes of this project, when the pattern indicates a M1, simply cast a new stitch on the peg indicated by the pattern.

 

Instructions

Right Scallops:

Begin at peg 6.  Working from left to right, cast on 3 stitches.

Row 1:  Sl 1, K2.

Row 2:  Sl 1, K2, M1.

Row 3:  Sl 1, K3.

Row 4:  Sl 1, K3, M1.

Row 5:  Sl 1, K4.

Row 6:  Sl 1, K4, M1.

Row 7:  Sl 1, K5.

Row 8:  Sl 1, K5.

Row 9:  Sl 1, K5.

Row 10:  Sl 1, K3, K2tog.

Row 11:  Sl 1, K4.

Row 12:  Sl 1, K2, K2tog.

Row 13:  Sl 1, K3.

Row 14:  Sl 1, K1, K2tog.

 

Using the basic bind off method, bind off 2 stitches.  Place the remaining stitch back on peg 6.

 

Working from left to right, cast on 2 more stitches.  Repeat rows 1-14, creating a second scallop.  Using the basic bind off method, bind off 2 stitches.  Place the remaining stitch back on peg 6.

 

Continue working in this manner until there are 5 Right Scallops, or until the desired length has been created.  Using the basic bind off method, bind off 2 stitches.  Place the remaining stitch back on peg 6.

 

Left Scallops:

Begin at peg 6.  Working from right to left, cast on 2 more stitches.

Row 1:  Sl 1, P1, K1..

Row 2:  Sl 1, P2, M1.

Row 3:  Sl 1, P2, K1.

Row 4:  Sl 1, P3, M1.

Row 5:  Sl 1, P3, K1.

Row 6:  Sl 1, P4, M1.

Row 7:  Sl 1, P4, K1.

Row 8:  Sl 1, P5.

Row 9:  P2tog, P3, K1.

Row 10:  Sl 1, P4..

Row 11:  P2tog, P2, K1.

Row 12:  Sl 1, P3..

Row 13:  P2tog, P1, K1.

Row 14:  Sl 1, P2.

 

Using the basic bind off method, bind off 2 stitches.  Place the remaining stitch back on peg 6.

 

Locate the connecting stitch between the nearest Right Scallop and the one below it.

 

IMG_3576

 

Place this connecting stitch back on the loom, above the stitch on peg 6.  (Make sure that the knit side of the Right Scallop is facing the same direction as the knit side of the Left Scallop, and that together, they form a nice oval shape.)

 

IMG_3575

 

Knit the lower stitch over the upper stitch.

 

Working from right to left, cast on 2 more stitches.  Repeat rows 1-14, creating a second scallop.  Using the basic bind off method, bind off 2 stitches.  Place the remaining stitch back on peg 6.

 

Continue working in this manner until there are 5 Left Scallops, and they have all been joined to the Right Scallops – or until the desired length has been created.

 

Fasten off and weave in the yarn ends.  Steam to block.

 

IMG_3579

2 Comments

  • Jenny, this is so neat! I love it! It could also be used as a trim on an item, or even a pretty bracelet. Terrific job, as always! :)

  • Thank you Bethany :)

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Jul 10, 2016

Harvest Time Rug


photo 5Bring the fall colors to the inside of your home with this beautiful Harvest Time rug. With our little rug in ‘veggie’ colors of Eggplant purple, squash yellow, and herbal greens as a great reminder.  It’s fun and easy to knit and very durable.

Loom:  28” Knitting Board + Peg Extenders Loom.  Set up as double knit with    smallest setting of wood spacers-No extenders needed.

Yarn:  Lion Brand Wool-Ease Chunky, 80% Acrylic and 20% Wool, 153 yds per skein.  Machine Washable. Colors used #173 Willow (G), #131 Moss (M), #144 Eggplant (E).

Lion Brand Homespun (H), 98% Acrylic and 2% Polyester, Color Green, 185 yds per skein.  Machine Washable.

Purchase (2) skeins of each of the (4) yarns so you can have 2 skeins to pull from.  You will only use the yardage of one skein so they can be partial skeins.  If you plan to make a longer rug, you will need additional yarn or the 2 full skeins of each color.

Stitches:  ZigZag and Stockinette  (See review of ZigZag below)

Notions Needed:  Knit Hook, Crochet hook size 5, Large darning needle, Scissors.

Gauge:  3 stitches=1” and 4 rows=1”

Finished Size:  21” wide X 28” long

INSTRUCTIONS

Cast On in stockinette stitch, 62 stitches in center of loom. Color (G). Change to ZigZag stitch.

Work (16) rows, in ZigZag stitch.  Cut (G) yarn with 2-3” tail and tie on 2 strands of (M) yarn.  Working with 2 strands is very bulky, so work slowly.  When working with double strands, you can pull from both ends of the skein to get the (2) strands.(If preferred, you can use 1 strand of Lion Brand Thick n’Quick in same color.)

Work (2) rows in Stockinette with (M) yarn.  Do not cut the yarn as it will be used for the border of each row.

You will now tie on the yarns to create the (3) sections of color.  Tie on color (H) at 5th stitch.  Tie on color (G) at 23rd  stitch.  Tie on another skein of (H) at 42nd  stitch.  Tie on another 2 strands of (M) yarn at stitch 58.  You can pull from both ends of the Moss yarn skein to get the double strands from one skein.

You should work full rows of all colors to be sure the sections are equal.  If you want to twist at each joint of color, it will keep the yarn sections attached, but the yarns will get very tangled.  The option is to just allow the sections to be separate.  We will seam them together at the end.  This method is much faster and easier, and preferred.  Place the skeins in front of your knitting.

Work in Stockinette Stitch for all sections.  Work (4) stitches (M) yarn, (18) stitches (H) yarn1, (18) stitches (G) yarn, (18) stitches (H) yarn2, (4) stitches with 2nd (M) yarn.

Work all for (25) rows.  Cut the center yarns leaving 2” tails.  Do not cut the (M) yarns at beginning or end of loom.  This border will continue on all sections.

Tie on (E) yarn at stitch (5) stitch attaching to (H) yarn.  Tie on (H) yarn at stitch 23 attaching to (G) yarn.  Tie on other skein of (E) yarn at stitch 42 attaching to (H) yarn.

Lay yarn tails on the knitting between the pegs.

Work all for (25) rows.  Cut the center yarns leaving 2” tails.  Do not cut the (M) yarns.  Tie on the (H) yarn, the (G) yarn, and the 2nd skein of (H) yarn.

Work all for (25) rows.  You are now ready to add the stripe (M) rows.  If you choose to make your rug longer than 28”, you can repeat another 25 row section before doing the (M) stripe.

You will continue working with the first 2 strands of (M) yarn.  Cut all the others leaving a 2” yarn tail including the 2nd double strand of (M) yarn at end of loom.

Work (1) rows of (M) yarn across all stitches.  When you get to each of the yarn tails, stop and tie the yarn tail onto the working yarn, and then continue to end of row.  Repeat (1) additional row.

Cut and knot the 2 strands of (M) yarn.  Tie on (G) yarn.

Work in ZigZag stitch for (16) rows.

Cut the (G) yarn leaving 2” yarn tail.

Bind Off of loom using a basic 2-loop bind off starting at end of loom opposite the yarn tail.  Use the yarn tail to create a knot with the last loop.

Bind Off at anchor yarn starting at edge opposite the yarn tail.  Once complete, you can carefully remove the anchor yarn.  Pull in any yarn tails that are exposed.

Sewing the Seams:

photo 1

Connect all corners of color sections with a small piece of scrap yarn before doing the stitching.  Then work the pieces together by sewing with an invisible stitch so that the sewing does not show.

Once complete, your ‘Veggie’ Rug is ready to use.

 

 

 

ZIGZAG STITCH

This stitch is created by weaving every peg, front to back, across the loom at an angle.  Then the next row is done at the opposite angle.  This is what creates the ‘zig’ and the ‘zag’.  In order to get all pegs covered, it is necessary to wrap the first 3 pegs at both ends with a straight weave also.  We will use 2 different yarns to illustrate.

Start the row by weaving front to back on first 3 pegs.  Be sure to start by noting from which side the yarn is coming, and continue in that direction.

Now, going back to peg 1, weave the photo 2(3)diagonal weave across the loom covering all pegs with a new loop.  Note that the weaving is going in opposite direction from previous row.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you get to end, yophoto 4(1)u must repeat the straight weave on last 3 pegs so that all pegs have a new wrap.

 

 

 

photo 5

 

 

 

 

This will result in one side of loom with an extra wrap on last 3 pegs.  Same situation on the first 3 pegs.  If you pegs have both the straight weave and the diagonal weave, this is a thick side.  If you only have the straight weave on the 3 pegs, this is your thin side.

photo 4(2)

When you hook over all pegs on the row, lift one over one.  If you have 3 loops, lift 1 over 2 on the thick side, and lift 2 over 1 on the thin side.

(This is thick side.  Lift one loop over 2 loops.)

 

 

 

 

(This is thin side.  Lift 2 loops over one loop.)

 

Now, weave the next row at opposite angle.  If you start and you see it’s the same angle, this means that you started on the wrong side of loom.  Go photo 2(4)back and wrap again.

Designed by Pat Novak

2 Comments

  • The rug looks great. How hard is it knitting with two strands of such thick yarn if one has a touch of arthritis?

  • The two strands are not harder to move than a single strand of super chunky yarn. I just suggest that you go slower pace so that both strands get worked as one. Also, relax with the stitches and they will be comfortable to move.

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Jul 4, 2016

Stitchology 23 : Lattice with Seed Stitch

Summertime is here and that calls for a stitch that won’t take too much time away from those busy summer schedules to master.  It’s another one of those stitches that consists of only knits and purls—perfect for a quick knit with loads of texture and possible future uses.  This one is truly lovely and reminiscent of the woven crusts on the top of  a scrumptious cherry pie!

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Lattice and Seed Stitch Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in berries)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

This versatile stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to a variety of projects, especially ones that the back side isn’t featured, as the design is best displayed from the front.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 14 + 2 sts added at the end—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat + the number of ending sts to complete the pattern.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
rep: repeat
CO: cast on
k:  knit
p: purl
wy: working yarn
BO: bind off

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

The blue columns in the above chart represents the added 2 stitches needed to be tacked at the end of the repeating rows to complete the pattern.  This is why the stitch pattern is listed as a repeat of 14+2 stitches.  Stitches 1-14 are repeated as desired, then stitches 15 & 16 are added at the end to complete the pattern.  These last 2 stitches will be implemented below as if there is only one pattern,  with no repeats.

Row 1:  k16.

Rows 2, 4, 6: k2, *(p1, k1) 3 times, k1, rep from * .

Rows 3, 5, 7: k3, *(p1, k1) twice, k3,  rep form * to last 2 sts, k2.

Rows 8 & 10: p14, k2.

Rows 9 & 11: k16.

Rows 12, 14, 16:  rep Rows 2, 4, 6

Rows 13, 15, 17: rep Rows 3, 5, 7

Rows 18 & 20:  *k2, p5, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 19: k16.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 41 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  p41.

Row 2:  k41.

Row 3:  p41.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 4:  k41.

Rows 5, 7, 9: p2, k2, *(p1, k1) 3 times, k1, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Rows 6, 8, 10: k5, *(p1, k1) twice, k3,  rep from * to last st, k1.

Rows 11 & 13: p2, k2, *p12, k2, rep from * to last 9 sts, p9.

Rows 12 & 14: k41.

Rows 15, 17, 19:  rep Rows 5, 7, 9.

Rows 16, 18, 20: rep Rows 6, 8, 10.

Rows 21 & 23:  p9, *k2, p12, rep from * to last 4 sts, k2, p2.

Row 22: k41.

Rows 23-70: rep Rows 4-22.

Finishing Rows

Row 71: p41.

Row 72:  k41.

Row 73:  p41.

Row 74:  k41.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

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Jun 26, 2016

Semaphore Socks

Semaphore Socks

Summer camp is a fun rite of passage while growing up.  It has all the excitement of being away from home, making new friends, and having lots of new adventures.  Most camps teach interesting new skills to take home and remember for a lifetime…one of them could be learning to communicate via an old secret code: flag symbols, or semaphore!

An entire alphabet and numbers could be signaled depending on the positioning of these special flags.  Although the code is not so much used these days, these sporty socks recall to mind the thrill of learning new adventures, along with all the excitement of summer.   

 

LOOM:  Sock Loom EFG (shown at 64 pegs).

YARN:  Approx 300 yds of washable sock weight.  Lion Brand Sock-Ease Yarn in Marshmallow was used in sample for the MC, Patons Kroy Socks Yarn in Purple Haze was used for the CC. Both are 75% washable wool and 25% nylon.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, 2 double pointed needles in size 1 or 2 (used to Kitchener the toe), row counter, measuring tape.

GAUGE: 15 sts x 22 rows= 2” in stockinette.

SIZE:  Shown in size 6-7 women. To create a larger, but still narrower size, simply work the foot section to 1.5 inches of desired length, then follow the toe instructions.  To create a larger and wider size (size 8-9 women), follow the instructions for using 72 pegs in parenthesis, along with making the foot section the desired length as described previously.  Of course, gauge will always be a consideration for a proper fit.

ABBREVIATIONS

MC: main color

CC: contrast color

CO: cast on

WY: working yarn

k: knit

KO: knit off

sts: stitches

rnd(s): round(s)

w&t: wrap and turn (remove loop from the peg and hold it. With working yarn, wrap the peg from the inside of the loom to the outside. You will then knit in the opposite direction.)

BO: bind off

 

Pattern Notes:

The sample was worked in a freeform colorway style to enhance the feel of the freedom of summertime.

To make the socks match as closely as possible, work one sock normally and then when beginning the second sock, locate the spot on the yarn that resembles the same colorway as where the first sock was started and begin at this point.

All knits were worked as the true knit stitch or U-stitch, not ewrap.

The colorwork sections of this pattern are worked by using the stranded method.  Simply carry the yarn not being used behind the pegs.  When picking up the next color to be used, bring it up and over the previous yarn.  If the yarn not being used will be trailed across more than 3 pegs, make sure to twist it up and over the yarn being used so that the strand will be prevented from trailing too long, thus having the tendency to catch on toes.

*Tip: keep your two yarns being used at an even tension, being careful not to pull too tightly.

Colorwork Chart for 64 Pegs:

Semaphore Socks 64 Peg Color Chart

Colorwork Chart for 72 Pegs:

 Semaphore Socks 72 Peg Color Chart

 

INSTRUCTIONS 

Set knitting loom to 64 (72) pegs.  Using CC, CO in a clockwise direction to work in the round.

Cuff

Rnds 1-10: k.

Rnds 11-18(26): Using MC, k.

Continue to heel. (If you prefer a longer sock, repeat Rnds 11-18(26), until sock leg measures desired length, typically around 7-8 inches from cast on edge.)

Heel

The heel is worked using CC yarn and the short-row method over the first 33(36) stitches (takes place from peg 1 to peg 33(36).

The instructions for creating the short-row heel can be found at the end of pattern for both 64 and 72 peg versions.

If familiar with a short-row heel, simply follow the Heel and Toe Part I, decrease until there are 11(12) pegs unwrapped. Then follow Heel and Toe Part 2, increase back to a full 33(36) pegs.

Foot

Rnd 19(27): Skip peg 1 as it was just wrapped on the last short-row. Using MC yarn, k63(71).  (KO 3 over 1 on peg 33(36).

Rnds 20-28(28-36): k.  (KO 3 over 1 on peg 1 for first rnd.)

Rnds 29-36(37-44): Using both MC and CC, follow 8 rows of Colorwork Chart for the number of pegs being used.

Rnds 37-48(45-66): Using only MC, k. (Add additional rounds here if there will be additional length needed at the foot.)

Rnds 49-56(67-74): Using both MC and CC, follow 8 rows of Colorwork Chart for the number of pegs being used.

Rnds 57-66(75-84): Using only MC, k.

Toe

Repeat the same steps that you used to turn the heel, making sure to use the same pegs and side of the loom as before.

Remove the live stitches from pegs 1-32(36) and place them on one of the double pointed needles. Remove remaining 32(36) stitches (pegs 33-64(37-72) and place them on second double pointed needle.

Close the toe with the Kitchener stitch (see tutorial included in this post for instructions).

Weave in all ends. Block lightly.

 

Short-row heel (and toe) Instructions For 64 Pegs:

  • Knit from peg 1 to peg 32, w&t peg 33.
  • Knit from peg 32 to peg 2, w&t peg 1.
  • Knit from peg 2 to peg 31, w&t peg 32.
  • Knit from peg 31 to peg 3, w&t peg 2.
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 30, w&t peg 31.
  • Knit from peg 30 to peg 4, w&t peg 3.
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 29, w&t peg 30.
  • Knit from peg 29 to peg 5, w&t peg 4.
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 28, w&t peg 29.
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 6, w&t peg 5.
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 27, w&t peg 28.
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 7, w&t peg 6.
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 26, w&t peg 27.
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 8, w&t peg 7.
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 25, w&t peg 26.
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 9, w&t peg 8.
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 24, w&t peg 25.
  • Knit from peg 24 to peg 10, w&t peg 9.
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 23, w&t peg 24.
  • Knit from peg 23 to peg 11, w&t peg 10.
  • Knit from peg 11 to peg 22, w&t peg 23.
  • Knit from peg 22 to peg 12, w&t peg 11.

(Note: The following increase rows will require working all previous wraps and stitches together as one as the pegs are knit and w&t’d. This can be up to 2 wraps and a stitch worked as one.)

  • Knit from peg 12 to peg 23, w&t peg 24 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg)
  • Knit from peg 23 to peg 11, w&t peg 10 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 11 to peg 24, w&t peg 25.
  • Knit from peg 24 to peg 10, w&t peg 9.
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 25, w&t peg 26.
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 9, w&t peg 8.
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 26, w&t peg 27.
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 8, w&t peg 7.
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 27, w&t peg 28.
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 7, w&t peg 6.
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 28, w&t peg 29.
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 6, w&t peg 5.
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 29, w&t peg 30 .
  • Knit from peg 29 to peg 5, w&t peg 4.
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 30, w&t peg 31 .
  • Knit from peg 30 to peg 4, w&t peg 3.
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 31, w&t peg 32.
  • Knit from peg 31 to peg 3, w&t peg 2.
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 32, w&t peg 33.
  • Knit from peg 32 to peg 2, w&t peg 1.

Peg 1 and Peg 33 still have wraps on them. Continue to the foot instructions. On the first round, pick up the wraps together with the stitch (3 over 1) as the next round is worked.

Short-row heel (and toe) Instructions For 72 Pegs:

  • Knit from peg 1 to peg 35, w&t peg 36.
  • Knit from peg 35 to peg 2, w&t peg 1.
  • Knit from peg 2 to peg 34, w&t peg 35.
  • Knit from peg 34 to peg 3, w&t peg 2.
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 33, w&t peg 34.
  • Knit from peg 33 to peg 4, w&t peg 3.
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 32, w&t peg 33.
  • Knit from peg 32 to peg 5, w&t peg 4.
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 31, w&t peg 32.
  • Knit from peg 31 to peg 6, w&t peg 5.
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 30, w&t peg 31.
  • Knit from peg 30 to peg 7, w&t peg 6.
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 29, w&t peg 30.
  • Knit from peg 29 to peg 8, w&t peg 7.
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 28, w&t peg 29.
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 9, w&t peg 8.
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 27, w&t peg 28.
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 10, w&t peg 9.
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 26, w&t peg 27.
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 11, w&t peg 10.
  • Knit from peg 11 to peg 25, w&t peg 26.
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 12, w&t peg 11.
  • Knit from peg 12 to peg 24, w&t peg 25.
  • Knit from peg 24 to peg 13, w&t peg 12.

(Note: The following increase rows will require working all previous wraps and stitches together as one as the pegs are knit and w&t’d. This can be up to 2 wraps and a stitch worked as one.)

  • Knit from peg 13 to peg 25, w&t peg 26 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg)
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 12, w&t peg 11 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 12 to peg 26, w&t peg 27 .
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 11, w&t peg 10.
  • Knit from peg 11 to peg 27, w&t peg 28.
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 10, w&t peg 9.
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 28, w&t peg 29.
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 9, w&t peg 8.
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 29, w&t peg 30.
  • Knit from peg 29 to peg 8, w&t peg 7.
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 30, w&t peg 31.
  • Knit from peg 30 to peg 7, w&t peg 6.
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 31, w&t peg 32.
  • Knit from peg 31 to peg 6, w&t peg 5.
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 32, w&t peg 33.
  • Knit from peg 32 to peg 5, w&t peg 4.
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 33, w&t peg 34.
  • Knit from peg 33 to peg 4, w&t peg 3.
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 34, w&t peg 36.
  • Knit from peg 34 to peg 3, w&t peg 2.
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 35, w&t peg 36.
  • Knit from peg 35 to peg 2, w&t peg 1.

Peg 1 and Peg 36 still have wraps on them. Continue to the foot instructions.  On the first round, pick up the wraps together with the stitch (3 over 1) as the next round is worked.

 

To leave a question or comment for Bethany Dailey, simply add your comments to the section below! :)

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Jun 20, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Are Selvages?

Loom FAQs

 

 

 

 

One of the most commonly questioned topics in loom knitting is edges.  How do I get my edges to match?  How do I keep my edges from curling?  How do I make pretty edges??  

While there are are different ways to keep those edges clean and pretty (some of these ways are discussed in Loom FAQs:  To Slip or Not To Slip?  and Loom FAQs:  Why Do Knits Curl?), there is one word that popped up that I never associated with knitting.  Only with sewing.  And that word is “selvage”.

So let’s talk edges and what they have to with a selvage.

What is a selvage?

A selvage is the edge of a woven fabric that will not unravel.  It is different from the rest of the fabric making a narrow border.  Usually is it a bit thicker than the fabric itself.

While most people are familiar with the selvages on fabric in sewing, a selvage can be knit on the edges of any flat panel project creating a nice, clean, slightly thicker edge.

The word selvage comes from the combining of the words “self” and “edge”.  The word originates in late Middle English of the mid 1400’s.

How do I work a selvage in knitting on a loom?

There are 2 different selvages that we will discuss:  double selvage and triple selvage.  Either one can be worked with any stitch pattern.  I will show each selvage on stockinette and on garter stitch.

Sometime this method is called an i-cord edge.

Each method is worked over 2 rows and repeated for the entire project.

Each method will be written first then demonstrated with pictures.

Before we get started, please do not read the written and think it is too hard.  Nothing is too hard.  Please remember that you just need to sit down and work it stitch by stitch.  Do not let the abbreviations intimidate you.  YOU CAN DO THIS!  I believe in you.

Abbreviations for written instructions:

k:  knit

p:  purl

s:  slip/skip

wyif:  working yarn in front

wyib:  working yarn in back

st(s):  stitch(es)

Double Selvage

Double selvage with stockinette stitch – front

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double selvage stockinette stitch - back

Double selvage stockinette stitch – back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double selvage with garter stitch body

Double selvage with garter stitch body

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When working the double selvage on a flat panel, you will need to add 4 stitches to whatever stitch pattern you will be working, 2 for each side.

Written Instructions:

Row 1:  s1 wyib, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 2 pegs), s1 wyib, p1

Row 2:  s1 wyif, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 2 pegs), s1 wyib, k1

Repeat rows 1 – 2 for the length of the project.

 

Now for some photos…

Row 1:

sl1wyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

knit peg 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2:  knit the stitch on the peg

 

Work desired stitch pattern until last 2 pegs.

 

slwyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg:  slip stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch unworked

 

purl last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg:  purl the stitch on the peg

 

Row 2:

sl1wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1 on row 2:  slip stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bringing the working yarn in front of the work, and replacing the loop back onto the peg.

 

knit next to last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2 on row 2:  knit the stitch

Work desired stitch pattern until last 2 pegs.

slwyib row 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg on row 2:  slip stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

knit last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg on row 2:  knit the stitch

 

Repeat rows 1 and 2 for the entire project.

 

Triple Selvage

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch – front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch - back

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch – back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triple selvage with garter stitch

Triple selvage with garter stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When working the triple selvage on a flat panel, you will need to add 6 stitches to whatever stitch pattern you will be working, 3 for each side.

Written Instructions:

Row 1:  s1 wyib, s1 wyif, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 3 pegs), k1, s1 wyif, p1

Row 2:  s1 wyif, p1, s1 wyib, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 3 pegs), s1 wyib, p1, k1

 

Now for some photos…

Row 1:

sl1wyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

peg 2 sl wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

knit peg 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 3:  knit the stitch

Continue with desired stitch pattern for the body of the work until the last 3 pegs.

 

2nd to last peg:  Knit stitch on peg (not shown)

 

slwyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

purl last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg:  Purl the stitch on the peg.

 

Row 2:

 

sl1wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1 on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

purl peg 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2 on row 2:  Purl stitch on peg.

 

sl back 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 3 on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

Continue with desired stitch pattern until the last 3 stitches.

 

slip back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd to last peg on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

purl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg on row 2:  purl stitch on peg

 

knit last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg on row 2:  knit stitch on peg

 

Repeat rows 1 and 2 for the entire project.

 

For those of you who like to find the patterns in life like I do, here is something that may help.

For the pegs that have knit stitches, the slipped stitch is in the back on the next row.

For the pegs that have purl stitches, the slipped stitch is in the front on the next row.

This is for the selvage only.  This will not apply for whatever stitch pattern used for the body of the work.

 

Well I hope you are as excited about selvages as I am!  Happy loom knitting!

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Jun 20, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?

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Socks are a project that is intimidating even to the most experienced knitter.  I never had the desire to even knit my own socks although I knew all the techniques used except for the Kitchener stitch to seam to the toe.  THAT is what intimidated me more than anything.  But questions are asked often regarding loom knitting socks.  How do I knit sock on a loom?  What loom is best for knitting socks with sock yarn?  How do I keep my stitches from getting too tight?  How do I keep from having holes when working short rows on the heel and toe?  With all those questions and more, let’s talk socks!

I have recently started knitting my own socks.  AND I LOVE IT!!  Completely surprised me how much I have enjoyed knitting my own socks on the extra fine gauge sock loom.  And now I would love to share with you some things I have learned along the way.

Why would I want to knit my own socks when I can buy them?

While it is easier and cheaper to buy socks, you don’t have that same sense of accomplishment and pride as when you make your own socks.

Are socks hard?

Not as hard as you might think.  Socks are fun to make.  While there are lots of different patterns out there and the combination of stitch patterns, cuff, toe, and heel types are limitless, the basic sock itself is really not that hard.  There are only 4 techniques you really need to get started making your own socks.  Knit and purl stitches, short row shaping using the wrap and turn technique for the heel and toe, and closing the toe with the Kitchener stitch.

What kind of yarn do I use for socks?

You need to use the yarn that is best suited for the type of socks you are making and the type of loom.  You will want to use a wool blend yarn.

Yarn that is labeled as sock yarn is a 1 weight yarn.  It usually has a fiber content of 75% superwash wool and 25% nylon.  Why?  This blend of yarn helps give the sock memory when it gets wet.  There are some brands that do make a wool-free sock yarn for those that are wool sensitive.

What is superwash wool, and why is it different than plain wool?

Superwash wool will not shrink or felt when washed in warm or hot water.  This yarn is machine washable.  While most superwash yarn says it can be dried in the clothes dryer, I prefer to just shape my socks and let them air dry on a towel.

Do I need a sock loom to make socks?

No.  You can use any loom as long as you can get the fit you need.  I will say this though.  If you are wanting to make socks to wear with shoes, you will need to use sock yarn on a fine or extra fine gauge loom.  The larger the weight of yarn you use, the thicker the sock will be.  Worsted weight and bulky yarns make wonderful slipper socks to wear around the house.

I will also warn you that not all companies that make looms use the same terminology for loom gauge since there are no universal guidelines set up for this.  It gets confusing for people, when new looms come out , when the looms are listed as fine gauge when another company that has been making them for years has that same gauge loom listed as small gauge.  You can refresh your memory on loom gauge in Loom FAQs:  What is gauge?

Is there only 1 way to work a sock?

No there isn’t.  A sock can be worked from toe up where you start at the the toe and work work your way up to the cuff or from top down where you start with the cuff and work down.

What are the parts of the sock?

There are 5 parts to a sock.

Cuff – This is the top of the sock.  Most patterns use a 2×2 ribbing for the cuff since it has the most stretch and helps keep the sock from falling down the leg.

Leg – This is between the cuff and the heel.  It can be any length and any stitch pattern preferred.  I love to wear ankle socks so I only work about an inch and a half between the cuff and the heel.  Different people like different heights of socks.  The leg part of the sock is where you make the height of your sock to your liking.

Heel – This is the part between the leg and foot.  Tube socks won’t have a heel so they will bunch up in front of the ankle.  Turning the heel will give the sock shape so it will be no bunching at all.

Foot –  The foot is between the heel and the toe.  Seems a bit obvious…  But still.  There are actually 2 parts of the the foot.  The top half of the foot is the instep.  Lots of patterns will work the instep in the same stitch pattern as the leg.  The bottom half of the foot is the sole.  It is almost always worked in stockinette or plain knit stitch so it’s more comfortable to walk in.

Toe –  The toe of the sock is just that:  The part where the toes fit.  It is shaped so that there is not extra knitted fabric around the toes.

How many ways are there to turn a heel or work the toe?

I know of at least 16 ways to turn a heel.  There are probably more.  And almost as many ways to shape the toe.  Everyone has their favorite way to work the heel and toe.

What does it mean to “turn” the heel?  This just refers to the way the heel is worked to cause the heel to bend into the shape of the sock.

Which knit stitch do I use?

It depends on which gauge you are using.  The finer the gauge, the harder it is to use the true knit stitch.  Lots of people do use the flat knit for fine and extra fine gauge socks since it’s less time consuming.

I do NOT recommend e-wrap knit at all for socks of any kind.  I do know lots of people do for slipper socks on large gauge looms.  But you must remember that when you use e-wrap knit while working in the round, the twist of the stitch while going in the same direction each round will cause a laddering effect between the columns of stitches.

What is laddering?  This is when you can see a bar of yarn between each stitch instead of each stitch sitting nicely side by side.  You can learn more about that in Loom FAQs:  What is Laddering?.

For more information on the different knit stitches and how they are worked on the loom, please refer to Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch??

How do I keep my stitches from getting too tight?

This is very common when using the flat knit or even the u-wrap knit stitches.  Here is how I keep my stitches from getting too tight while using the flat knit stitch while making socks.

13460880_10209059112370067_1973504942_o

 

I hold the working yarn taunt across the front of the pegs so that the yarn is not pulled over the peg with the loop I am knitting over.

 

 

 

13461155_10209059120690275_1900398645_o

 

When I pull the loop over the top of the peg, I let go of the working yarn and gently pull back on the loop to the middle of the loom causing the stitch to loosen.

 

 

Even if you loosen the flat knit stitch, it is still the flat knit.  It is the method of carrying the yarn across the front of the pegs instead of wrapping it around the peg that makes it the flat knit.  You are just controlling the tension by loosening each stitch as you go to keep it from being too tight.

How many pegs do I use?

The number of pegs depends on which loom you are using.  If you are using one of the KB sock looms, the instructions that came with the loom includes how to measure the foot to determine how many pegs.

Otherwise math is involved more heavily…  And working a swatch…  All those evil things that make me laugh like a mad scientist…

Um huh…  Pardon me for getting distracted.  Back to calculating peg count.

First you will need to work a dreaded swatch for a stitch count.  If you need a refresher course on working a swatch, you can find it about the middle of Loom FAQs:  What is Gauge?

Once you find how many stitches per inch you get with your yarn on the loom you are going to use, you need to measure your foot or the foot intended for the sock.  Using a sewing tape measure, wrap the tape around the ball of the foot at the widest part.  Do not squeeze it tight.  Take that measurement in inches and subtract 15% of that measurement.  This is what is called negative ease.   Otherwise the sock will be too big.  If you multiply the number of inches by .85, you will get the same answer as if multiplying the measurement by .15 and subtracting that number from the original measurement.  What???  Give me a bit and I will put into an equation…

Now multiple that number by the number of stitches you got in an inch with your swatch.  That is the number of pegs you will need to cast on.

Now to put that into the equation.

A = measurement of foot around the ball in inches

B = number of stitches in an inch from the swatch

A  x  .85  x  B = number of pegs to cast on

Is there a formula to making socks?

Oh!  I am so happy you asked!  I love formulas.  I love math.  I think you know this by now unless you are new to reading my articles.  For those who keep saying that they never use algebra as an adult, I will talk to you later….

YES!  There is a formula for making socks on any loom.  I will go through the process of working top down.

First of all, you will need to know which loom you want to use depending on yarn weight.  Please refer the previous section on peg count to calculate the number of pegs you will need to knit a sock to fit the foot you desire to sheathe.

Which peg is the first peg?

When working on any loom, you need to decide which peg is first.  It really doesn’t matter.  Just so long as you mark it and use that peg as peg 1 throughout the pattern.  When using any of the adjustable sock looms, I always use the peg on the side next to the slider.  This is how I know I have finished a round after working the pegs on the slider.  It also makes it easier to know where the 2 halves of the loom are.

Now you are ready to cast on.  I would recommend casting on with a method that will stretch and work well with ribbing.  I like using the YO cast on.  This method gives the stretch needed without the need to tighten up the cast on when using the e-wrap cast on.  Some people refer to the YO (yarn over) cast on as the double e-wrap cast on.

Now you are ready to work the cuff.  Work the cuff in whatever method desired.  There are several different cuffs depending on what look you are going for.  Most common is the 2×2 ribbing.  It has the best elasticity to help keep those socks from sagging.

On to the leg, work it in any stitch pattern you desire for whatever length you desire.   It is your sock after all.

Now for the heel,  this is where the math come into play.

Formula for working a short row heel on any loom

While there are numerous ways to work a heel, I will be only instructing you on how to work the short row heel so that this article won’t run on for days.

First the loom will need to be divided into half.  Divide the total peg count by 2.

# of pegs / 2 = half the peg count

13499860_10209059107769952_2107441800_oThe first peg to the middle is the the pegs the heel will be worked over.  As the foot is worked, these are the pegs that are the sole.

 

 

Peg 1 on this loom is marked with the green stitch marker on the right.

The last peg of the first half is on the left marked with the purple stitch marker.

While you work the heel, the other half of the pegs from the middle to the last peg are left unworked.  These pegs are the stitches that are the instep on the foot section of the sock.

To work a short row heel, the half of the loom you are working over needs to first be divided into thirds.  It will not always be divisible by 3.  If this is the case, you will either have 1 section that has either 1 peg more than the other 2 sections or 1 less peg than the other 2 sections.  This section will always be the middle third of the heel.

Either mark the loom or keep up with the rows.

Since you will be working a flat panel now, you will need to do a wrap and turn at the end of each short row.  If you don’t do this, you will have a holes where you start back in the other direction.

Wrap & Turn 

Wrap and turns are abbreviated in patterns as W&T.

Work the first short row in knit until you reach the last peg of the heel portion.  This is how you work a W&T:

1

 

 

Holding the yarn to the side of the peg that the working yarn is on,

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

lift the loop off the peg.

Bring the working yarn behind the peg in front of the loop to the other side of the peg.

 

 

 

4

 

 

Place the loop back on the peg bringing the working yarn around front of the peg.

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

Knit the next peg leaving 2 loops on the wrapped peg.

 

 

 

 

Continue back to the first peg.

1

 

 

 

Wrap the first peg in the same manner as before

 

 

 

2

 

 

by lifting the loop off the peg

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

bringing the working yarn behind the peg and placing the loop back on the peg.

 

 

 

 

Knit back until you reach the peg next to the wrapped peg and wrap that peg.

Continue going back and forth wrapping the next peg over until 1/3 of the pegs are wrapped on each side leaving the middle pegs unwrapped.

1

 

 

 

 

Now to work your way back out…

2

 

Knit until you reach the first peg with 2 wraps.

 

 

1

 

 

Knit both loops over.

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

Wrap and turn on the next peg by lifting both loops and placing the wrap under them.  Be careful that both loops are placed back on the peg over the wrap.

 

 

 

4

 

 

Now you have 3 loops on that peg.

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

Knit back again repeating the W&Ts until all the pegs have been worked leaving 3 wraps on the first and the last of the first half of the pegs.

 

 

On the first round of the foot, you will start with peg 2 after completing the W&T on peg 1.  When you reach the last peg of the first half that has 3 loops on it, knit over all 3 together and continue on the instep side.  When peg 1 is reached again, knit over all 3 loops together.

Do I need to lift the top loop for the W&T?

Some people prefer not to lift the loop and just wrap the peg above the loop.  This does create a more seamless join.  But it does leave holes.  Also it will put those wraps on the inside of the sock creating a seam that can be irritating to the heels and toes.

Continuing on…

After the heel, the instep and sole of the foot is worked.  The first half of the stitches will be the sole and is usually just worked in stockinette.  The second half of the stitches is the instep.  Usually the stitch pattern used for the leg is continued on the instep half of the stitches.

Measure the foot you are fitting from the back of the heel to the end of the longest toe.  Then subtract 1.5″ or 2″ (depending on how snug you like your socks) from that length.  Work the foot until the foot measures the length just calculated from the heel.  I usually just stick a ruler into my sock with the end at the heel and measure at the short end of the sock loom.  Despite the work still being stretched out on the pegs, this method of measuring is fairly accurate.

Then work the toe.  Use whichever toe method preferred.  I use the short row that is the exact same as the heel.  If you prefer the seam to be on top of the toes, work the short rows over the first half of the stitches exactly like the heel was worked.  If you want the seam under the toes, knit the first half of the stitches then work the toe on the second half of the pegs.

Does the Kitchener Stitch require knowing how to needle knit?

No it doesn’t.  Only thing the needles are used for if to hold the stitches.  You actually use a tapestry needle to sew the loops together to create a seamless join.

What does DPN mean?

DPN knitting needles are what is used for the Kitchener stitch.  DPN stands for Double Point Needles.  These needles have points are both ends and are used in needle knitting to knit in the round.  These needles are sold in sets of 5.  You will only need 2.

13460808_10209059135250639_1920347726_o

What size DPNs do I use?

I recommend using the next size needle down from the needle equivalent to the loom gauge you are using to make your socks.  You can find the rough needle equivalents close to the end of my article Loom FAQs:  How Do I Convert?

What exactly is the Kitchener Stitch and what does it have to do with kitchens??

The Kitchener stitch is a method of joining or grafting 2 rows of live stitches in a nice seamless manner using the working yarn on a tapestry needle.  And it has nothing to do with kitchens…

Why is it called Kitchener stitch?

Well history has it that an Englishman by the name Horatio Herbert Kitchener, First Earl of Kitchener of Khartoum, developed the seamless graphing join during World War I to prevent the damage done to the soldiers feet because of the seam on the toes.

While this is when this technique first came into being and while Lord Kitchener did head up the campaign of getting women in Britain, America, and Canada to knit comfort items from a booklet of patterns during WWI that included socks using the seamless join, there is actually no concrete evidence that he actually developed the seamless join himself.  But it was named after him, and he will forever be joined to the knitting community.  Way to go, Lord Kitchener!

How is the correct way to load the stitches onto the needles?

The stitches do need to be loaded or put on the double point needles in a certain manner, or the join will not be seamless.

1

 

 

Start loading the stitches from the last stitch on the first half and work back to the first stitch.

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

Lift the stitch off the peg and put it on the DPN by running the needle from the front of the stitch to the back.

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

Then repeat that with the next stitch working back to the first peg until all the stitches on the first half of the loom are on the needle.

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

Now all the stitch on the first half of the loom are on the needle.

 

 

 

5

 

 

Then repeat on the second half of the stitch by starting with the last peg and working back to the first peg of the second half.

 

 

 

 

6

 

All stitches are on 2 DPNs with the working yarn on the right.  The first half of the stitches are the needle closest to you or the front needle.  The last half of the stitches are on the back needle.

 

 

 

If you are left handed or just work in the opposite direction, just reverse what I did.

Do I have to use needles to close the toe for the Kitchener Stitch?

No.  There is a way to work the Kitchener stitch while the stitches are still on the loom.  While I prefer to use the needles to hold my stitches while I work the seam, it can be done on the loom.

Currently there is a video out there that demonstrates how to do the Kitchener stitch on the loom.  I find it confusing since none of the stitches are removed as you go making it harder to see where you are and easier to miss a stitch.

I have come up with a way to use the loom to work the Kitchener stitch in the same manner as using needles where the stitches are removed as you go.  This makes it easier to see if all the stitches are being worked in order, and none are being skipped.

How do I set up the loom for the Kitchener stitch?

To work the Kitchener stitch on the loom, you will need to move the first half of the stitches over onto the second half of the pegs.  This way the first half of the stitches are sitting on the pegs above the second half of the stitches.

 

4

 

Load all the stitch from the first half onto something to hold them.  I use a DPN.  You can use a stitch holder or even a yarn lifeline.

 

 

Now move them over to the other side of the loom.

2

 

 

Place the each stitch onto the peg on the opposite side.

 

 

 

 

3

 

Continue with each stitch making sure the stitches are not twisted until all the stitches from the first half are on the pegs from the second half.

 

 

 

4

 

All stitches are on the same side of the loom.

 

 

 

5

 

In order for the Kitchener stitch to be worked on the loom exactly like it’s work on needles, the loom needs to turned upside down so the first half of the stitches is closest to you and the last half of the stitches are further from you.  The working yarn on the right.

 

How do I work the Kitchener stitch?

Now let me show you how to work the Kitchener stitch on needles AND the loom.  I will show the same thing on the needle first then show how on the loom.

When working the Kitchener stitch, whether on the loom or needles, each stitch must be worked twice in the opposite direction in order for the join to be seamless.  Now let’s get started.

Let’s first discuss what the terms “as if to knit” and “as if to purl” means.  This is the direction the yarn will be threaded through the stitch.

1

On needles, “as if to knit” means to run the tapestry needle through the stitch from the left to the back of the stitch.

2

On the loom, “as if to knit” means to run the tapestry needle through the stitch from the top of the peg to the bottom.

3

On needles, “as if to purl” means to run the tapestry needle from the right through the stitch to the front.

4

On the loom, “as if to purl” means to run the tapestry needle through the stitch from the bottom of the peg to the top.

Now to start the Kitchener stitch:

6

The front stitch is on the needle closest to you.

The back stitch is on the needle at the back.

5

The front stitch is the stitch at the end of the peg closest to you.

The back stitch is the stitch at the bottom of the peg.

To set up, insert the tapestry needle as if to purl on the front stitch.  Pull the working yarn completely through the stitch pulling snug.  Leave the stitch on the needle or peg.

3

From right to left.

4

From bottom to top.

Then insert the tapestry needle as if to knit on the back stitch pulling the working yarn snugly all the way through the stitch.  Leave the stitch on the needle or peg.

1

From left to right.

2

From top to bottom.

Now to actually start removing stitches from the needle or loom as the Kitchener stitch is worked.

Insert the tapestry needle as if to knit  through the front stitch REMOVING that stitch from the needle or peg as the working yarn is pulled all the way through the stitch that is removed.  Be careful not to pull the neighboring stitch off the needle or peg.

1

From left to right.

2

From top to bottom.

Now insert the tapestry needle as if to purl on the next stitch on the front LEAVING the stitch on the needle or peg pulling the working yarn all the way through.  Do not get the working yarn twisted around the needle or peg.

3

From right to left.

2

From bottom to top.

Now we will work the stitches on the back.

Insert the tapestry needle as if to purl in the stitch on the back REMOVING the stitch from the needle or peg and pulling the yarn snugly through the stitch.

1

From right to left.

2

From bottom to top.

Now insert the tapestry needle as if to knit in the stitch on the back LEAVING the stitch on the peg while pulling the working yarn snugly though the stitch.

3

From left to right.

4

From top to bottom.

Now you can see how 2 stitches are worked on the front removing the first but leaving the second then working 2 stitches on the back in the opposite way removing the first but leaving the second.

Here is how I keep up in my head as I work the stitches.

Front:  as if to knit, remove the stitch, as if to purl, leave the stitch

Back:  as if to purl, remove the stitch, as if to knit, leave the stitch

Then repeat.  Over and over and over…

5

You can see how the seamless grafting is looking as I go.

Continue in this manner until there is only 1 stitch each left on the front and back.

Insert the tapestry needle into the front stitch as if to knit REMOVING the stitch while pulling the working yarn snug.

1

From left to right.

2

From top to bottom.

Insert the tapestry need into the back stitch (only stitch left) as if to purl REMOVING the stitch while pulling the working yarn snug.

3

From right to left.

4

From bottom to top.

Look how pretty!!

5

Now there is what seems to be a rather large loop left.

6

Just run the tapestry needle through the the last stitch into the middle of the sock pulling that loop through and weave in the end.

7

Whew!!!  That is a lot to cover for something that only covers feet….  Once you make that first pair, there will be no stopping you!  Do not be afraid to try different heel and toe methods.  Different ways will fit differently.  Each foot is unique so our socks should be just as unique as our feet.  Best to have unique socks is to knit those unique socks ourselves!

As always, I hope this helps.  Happy sock loom knitting!

1 Comment

  • The wrap and turn was always my least favorite part of looming socks – sometimes I would lose my loop – especially when doing the increase and you have to be sure to get two loops back on the peg – the yarn is so tiny! ? I have come up with a solution that makes it unnecessary to lift your loops but still gets the turn beneath the existing loop. Sounds like magic, but it’s not. The idea came to me one time when I messed up a purl. So, you hold your working yarn beneath the existing loop. Then, as if to purl, put you loom hook down thru the existing loop and grab the working yarn. Up to this point it’s just like a purl. But now, instead of slipping off the existing loop, simply slip the working yarn over the peg. Ta da!! Now your working yarn is beneath the existing loop and you can turn and go back. I hope I explained that well. But that little trick totally takes the dread out of looming heels and toes. Enjoy!

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Jun 19, 2016

Happy Feet for Dad

 

Worked in luxurious Malabrigo merino wool… offer both comfort and warmth!

socks_mens

LOOM:  Sock Loom 2 (48 pegs)

YARN:  Approx 320 yds of worsted weight of merino wool. Malabrigo Arroyo in Azules was used in sample. If knitting a larger size, you will need approx 400 yrds.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

GAUGE: 11 sts x 16 rows = 2 inches in stockinette.

SIZE:  Sample shows a size 9 men’s. To make larger size, work the foot of the sock longer (about 1.5”) shorter than desired length, then work the toe.  

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

INSTRUCTIONS

Set knitting loom to 48 pegs.Happy Feet close up

CO 48 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1-Rnd 64 (approx. 8” from CO edge): *k3, p2, k1, p2: rep from * to end.

Rnd 64-80: k to end of rnd.

Heel

The heel is a short-row heel over the first 24 stitches (takes place from peg 1 to peg 24).

New to short-row heels: directions for Short-row heel instructions can be found at the end of pattern.

If familiar with a short-row heel, simply follow the Heel and Toe Part I, decrease until there are 12 pegs unwrapped. Then follow Heel and Toe Part 2, increase back to a full 24 pegs.

Foot

Next rnd: k to end of rnd.

Rep last rnd until foot measures approx. 8.75 from heel (or 1.5” less than desired length).

Toe

Repeat the same steps that you used to turn the heel, making sure to use the same pegs and side of the loom as before.

Remove stitches 1-24 from the loom and place them on one of the double pointed needles. Remove remaining 24 stitches (pegs 25-48) and place them on second double pointed needle. Graft edges to close the toe, using the Kitchener Stitch (see tutorial included in this post). 

Weave ends in. Block lightly.


 

Heel Instructions

 The short-row heel for this sock is worked over 24 pegs (pegs 1-24).

  • Knit from peg 1-23. W&T peg 24
  • Knit from peg 23-2. W&T peg 1
  • Knit from peg 2-22. W&T peg 23
  • Knit from peg 22-3. W&T peg 2
  • Knit from peg 3-21. W&T peg 22
  • Knit from peg 21-4. W&T peg 3
  • Knit from peg 4-20. W&T peg 21
  • Knit from peg 20-5. W&T peg 4
  • Knit from peg 5-19. W&T peg 20
  • Knit from peg 19-6. W&T peg 5
  • Knit from peg 6-18. W&T peg 19
  • Knit from peg 18-7. W&T peg 6
  • Knit from peg 7-19 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 20
  • Knit from peg 19-6 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 5 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 6-20(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 21 (two wraps and the stitch)
  • Knit from peg 20-5 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 4 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 5-21 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 22 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 21-4 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 3 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 4-22(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 23 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 22-3 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 2 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 3-23(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop) . W&T peg 24 (two wraps and a stitch)
  • Knit from peg 23-2 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 1 (two wraps and a stitch).

Pegs 1 and 24 have the wraps and the stitch. On the first round for the foot, work the wraps and the stitch together as a regular stitch.

On toe, leave the wraps there and continue to grafting the toes with the Kitchener stitch.

 

 

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Jun 13, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Basic Socks for 18″ Dolls

Whimsical Loom Knits – June 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

IMG_3565

With less than 40 yards of sock yarn, and a few spare hours, you can knit these sweet little socks for 18″ dolls.  

Knitting Loom: KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Approximately 35 yds of a light fingering weight yarn.  Footsie (in Punky), by Knit Fit Knitting, was used for this project.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, 2 double point knitting needles (size 2)

Gauge: 6 stitches and 10 rows = 1″

 

Special Techniques:

w&t:  Wrap and Turn

At the peg indicated in the pattern, using the knitting tool, lift the stitch(es) already in place up off of the peg and hold it(them) temporarily.  Pass the working yarn behind the peg and then across the front of the peg.  Place the held stitch(es) back on the peg, above the wrap that was just created. Wrap and turn is now complete.

 

Instructions

IMG_3568

(Make 2)

Cast on 24 pegs.  Prepare to work in the round.

 

Cuff:

Rounds 1 – 4:  K2, P2 to end of the round.

 

Leg:

Rounds 5 – 16:  Knit to the end of the round.

 

*Short row shaping:

K pegs 1 – 11, w&t peg 12.

K pegs 11 – 2, w&t peg 1.

K pegs 2 – 10, w&t peg 11.

K pegs 10 – 3, w&t peg 2.

K pegs 3 – 9, w&t peg 10.

K pegs 9 – 4, w&t peg 3.

K pegs 4 – 8, w&t peg 9.

K pegs 8 – 5, w&t peg 4.

(Note: For the following rows, when knitting a peg with more than 1 stitch on it, knit all stitches over together, as if they are one stitch.)

K pegs 5 – 9, w&t peg 10.

K pegs 9 – 4, w&t peg 3.

K pegs 4 – 10, w&t peg 11.

K pegs 10 – 3, w&t peg 2.

K pegs 3 – 11, w&t peg 12.

K pegs 11 – 2, w&t peg 1.

K pegs 2 – 24.

(Short row shaping is now complete.)

 

Foot:

Next 6 rounds:  Knit to the end of the round.

(Note: For the first round of this section, at peg 1, knit all stitches over together, as if they are one stitch.)

 

Toe:

Repeat the entire short row shaping section.

Next round:  Knit to the end of the round.

(Note: At peg 1, knit all stitches over together, as if they are one stitch.)

 

Finishing:

Place the stitches from pegs 12 – 1 on a double point knitting needle.  Place the stitches from 13 – 24 on another double point knitting needle.  Use kitchener stitch to close the toe.  Weave in all yarn ends.

Block, if desired.

IMG_3566

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  • Is there a printable version of this pattern. It looks so cute I would like to try it for my grandsons doll. Thank you. Wilma

  • Thank you for your kind comment, Wilma. I am sorry for the delayed reply. At the bottom of each post, you should see a little printer icon. If you click on the icon, it will load a printer friendly version of the post for you. For your convenience, I’m including a link to the printer friendly version of this post for you. You can find it here:

    http://www.printfriendly.com/print?url_s=uGGC%25dN%25cS%25cSoyBtmxAvGGvAtoBnEqmpBz%25cSnEpuvIrF%25cSfijd

    I hope that helps. Have a great weekend!

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Jun 12, 2016

Crescent Socks

Summer is here and with it means it is time to have some easy-to-carry projects like socks! Like waterfalls dripping down the rocks, the Crescent socks have a fluid stitch pattern that drips gently down to the toe of the sock. Worked in a self striping yarn that give them a summer feel. 

Crescent-Socks-1024x897

LOOM:  Sock Loom EFG (shown at 60 pegs).

YARN:  Approx 350 yds of sock weight of superwash merino wool.  Vesper Sock Yarn, self-striping in Pink Sorbet was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, 2 double pointed needles in size 1 or 2 (used to Kitchener the toe).

GAUGE: 15 sts x 19 rows= 2” in stockinette.

SIZE:  Shown in size 7.5 women. To create a larger size, simply work the foot section to 1.5 inches of desired length, then follow the toe instructions.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

SSK=Slip, slip, knit

YO=Yarn over (ewrap the empty peg)

w&t=wrap and turn (remove loop from the peg and hold it, with working yarn, wrap the peg from the inside of the loom to the outside). You will then knit in the opposite direction.

Rnd(s)=round(s)

Tips:

  • I recommend to move all the stitches to their new positions before working (knitting) the round.
  • To make the socks match as closely as possible, work one sock normally and once you are to begin the second sock, locate the spot on the yarn that resembles the same coloway as where you started the first sock. Sample shows the sock starting in white, so the second sock was started at a section of white yarn.

INSTRUCTIONS Chart JPG

Set knitting loom to 60 pegs.

Cuff

Rnd 1-Rnd 16: *k1, p1; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 17: *p1, yo, k3, ssk, k4; rep from * to end.

Rnd 18 and all even-numbered Rnds: *p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Rnd 19: *p1, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k3; rep from * to end.

Rnd 21: *p1, k2, yo, k3, ssk, k2; rep from * to end.

Rnd 23: *p1, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1; rep from * to end.

Rnd 25: *p1, k4, yo, k3, ssk; rep from * to end.

Rnds 27 and 28: *p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Continue to heel. (If you prefer a longer sock, repeat Rnds 17-28, until sock leg measures desired length, typically around 7-8 inches from cast on edge.)

Heel

The heel is a short-row heel over the first 30 stitches (takes place from peg 1 to peg 30).

New to short-row heels: directions for Short-row heel instructions can be found at the end of pattern.

If familiar with a short-row heel, simply follow the Heel and Toe Part I, decrease until there are 10 pegs unwrapped. Then follow Heel and Toe Part 2, increase back to a full 30 pegs.

Foot

**Next rnd: Skip peg 1 as it was just wrapped on the last short-row. k29, *p1, yo, k3, ssk, k4; rep from * end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k3; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k2, yo, k3, ssk, k2; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, * p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Next rnd: p1, k29, *p1, k4, yo, k3, ssk; rep from * to end.

Next 3 rnds: p1, k29: *p1, k9; rep from * to end. **

Rep from ** to ** until foot measures approx. 1.5 less than desired length.

Toe

Repeat the same steps that you used to turn the heel, making sure to use the same pegs and side of the loom as before.

Remove the live stitches from pegs 1-30 and place them on one the double pointed needles. Remove remaining 30 stitches (pegs 31-60) and place them on second double pointed needle.

Close the toe with the Kitchener stitch(see tutorial included in this post for instructions).  .

Weave ends in. Block lightly.


Short-row heel (and toe) Instructions (over 30 pegs)

  • Knit from peg 1 to peg 29, w&t peg 30.
  • Knit from peg 29 to peg 2, w&t peg 1.
  • Knit from peg 2 to peg 28, w&t peg 29.
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 3, w&t peg 2.
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 27, w&t peg 28.
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 4, w&t peg 3.
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 26, w&t peg 27.
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 5, w&t peg 4.
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 25, w&t peg 26.
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 6, w&t peg 5.
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 24, w&t peg 25.
  • Knit from peg 24 to peg 7, w&t peg 6.
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 23, w&t peg 24.
  • Knit from peg 23 to peg 8, w&t peg 7.
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 22, w&t peg 23.
  • Knit from peg 22 to peg 9, w&t peg 8.
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 21, w&t peg 22.
  • Knit from peg 21 to peg 10, w&t peg 9.
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 20, w&t peg 21.
  • Knit from peg 20 to peg 11, w&t peg 10.
  • Knit from peg 11 to peg 21, w&t peg 22 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg)
  • Knit from peg 21 to peg 10, w&t peg 9(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 10 to peg 22, w&t peg 23 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 22 to peg 9, w&t peg 8 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 9 to peg 23, w&t peg 24 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 23 to peg 8, w&t peg 7 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 8 to peg 24, w&t peg 25(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 24 to peg 7, w&t peg 6 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 7 to peg 25, w&t peg 26(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 25 to peg 6, w&t peg 5 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 6 to peg 26, w&t peg 27(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 26 to peg 5, w&t peg 4 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 5 to peg 27, w&t peg 28(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from peg 27 to peg 4, w&t peg 3 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 4 to peg 28, w&t peg 29 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 28 to peg 3, w&t peg 2 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).
  • Knit from peg 3 to peg 29, w&t peg 30(two wraps and a stitch on this peg) .
  • Knit from 29 to peg 2, w&t peg 1 (two wraps and a stitch on this peg).

Peg 1 and Peg 30 have the wraps on them. Continue  to the foot instructions (on the first round, you will pick up the wraps together with the stitch as you work the next round.


Crescent Stitch Pattern

Multiple of 10 stitches; 12 round repeat

Rnd 1: *p1, yo, k3, ssk, k4; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 6 and hold it. Move loop from peg 5 to 6. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 6 (two loops on peg 6).
  • Move loops from peg 4 to 5, from 3 to 4, from 2 to 3. Peg 2 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, YO peg 2 (ewrap peg 2), knit pegs 3-10 (treat both loops on peg 6 as one loop).

Rnd 2: *p1, k9 (and all even rounds).

Rnd 3: *p, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k3; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 7 and hold it. Move loop from peg 6 to 7. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 7 (two loops on peg 7).
  • Move loops from peg 5 to 6, from 4 to 5, from 3 to 4. Peg 3 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2 YO peg 3 (ewrap peg 3), knit pegs 4-10 (treat both loops on peg 7 as one loop).

Rnd 5: *p, k2, yo, k3, ssk, k2; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 8 and hold it. Move loop from peg 7 to 8. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 8 (two loops on peg 8).
  • Move loops from peg 6 to 7, from 5 to 6, from 4 to 5. Peg 4 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2, knit peg 3, YO peg 4 (ewrap peg 4), knit pegs 5-10 (treat both loops on peg 8 as one loop).

Rnd 7: *p, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 9 and hold it. Move loop from peg 8 to 9. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 9 (two loops on peg 9).
  • Move loops from peg 7 to 8, from 6 to 7, from 5 to 6. Peg 5 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2, knit peg 3, knit peg 5, YO peg 5 (ewrap peg 5), knit pegs 6-10 (treat both loops on peg 9 as one loop).

Rnd 9: *p, k4, yo, k3, ssk; rep from * to end.

  • Remove loop off peg 10 and hold it. Move loop from peg 9 to 10. Place loop that you are holding back on peg 10 (two loops on peg 10).
  • Move loops from peg 8 to 9, from 7 to 8, from 6 to 7. Peg 6 is empty.
  • Purl peg 1, knit peg 2, knit peg 3, knit peg 4, knit peg 5, YO peg 6 (ewrap peg 6), knit pegs 7-10 (treat both loops on peg 10 as one loop).

Rnd 10-12:  *p1, k9 (and all even rounds).

2 Comments

  • Lovely socks :)
    I so want to try making these lovely socks one day soon :)

  • Thank you! I hope you have the chance soon to try them.

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Jun 6, 2016

Stitchology 22 : Mermaid Scales

 

The best part about this month’s new stitch pattern is that it is so very easy to accomplish, with only four rows to repeat and a technique that is worked over just 2 pegs…nice!  The most difficult part for me this time around was trying to decide what it most reminded me of to be able to choose a name, lol!  When I look at this square, I see a pretty lattice design that is anchored with knots on each side, but I also see four-pointed little flowers, sea stars, and even water droplets.  The more I got to looking at it, the more it seemed to be quite intricate and even a little mesmerizing. The knitting chart even turned out to resemble a sea full of rolling waves!  Mermaids seemed the perfect idea to convey a little bit of mystery, along with all things sparkling sea and sand for the beginning of summer. I hope you think so too…Enjoy!

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)  To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Mermaid Scales Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage neptune)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

 

Pattern Notes:

*For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

*When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.  When the stitch requires an e-wrap, it will be noted.

*All slip stitches (s1) for this pattern are completed by carrying the working yarn behind the peg(s).
Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
CO: cast on
ew E-wrap stitch
s1: slip/skip one peg
k: knit
KO: knit off
wy: working yarn
ssk: slip, slip, knit
m1: make one/increase by one
BO: bind off

__________________________________________________________________

*For ease in reading the pattern’s directions below, the steps  involving the pattern’s lacy stitch are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two pegs.

This pattern creates eyelets by the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) method, for a left leaning eyelet. The following dictates how to work them, along with the lace method, into the pattern:

[s1, ssk, m1, ew]:  Work over just 2 pegs (from right to left):

  • Move the loop from the s1 peg to the ssk peg.
  • Carry the wy behind the empty s1 peg to the ssk peg.
  • Knit off the first loop on the ssk peg and rather than letting the loop drop behind the peg, slide it back over the s1 peg for a “make one”(m1).
  • Knit off the 2nd loop on the ssk peg.
  • E-wrap the s1 peg and knit off.
  • Move to the next 2 pegs in line and prepare to ssk.  The wy will be carried behind both the original ssk peg and the newly empty s1 peg of the next 2 pegs in line.

____________________________________________________________________

*Please view this handy video for an easy to visualize tutorial on how to work the [s1, ssk, m1, ew] on only 2 pegs:  (*Clarification Note: the video describes the eyelet decrease as a knit 2 together (k2tog), but because it is a left leaning decrease, it is actually an ssk. ;) )

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

(*Note: The knits in Rows 2 and 4 are only added at the beginning and end of each of the rows to make them offset from one another. The repeating stitch count is actually in multiples of 2 + 1 for knitting in a flat panel. Check out the chart below of the entire square to see this in action.)

Row 1: k3.

Row 2: *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], rep from *,  k1.

Row 3: k3.

Row 4: k1, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], rep from *.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 30 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p30.

Row 2: k30.

Row 3: p30.

Main Pattern Rows

Mermaid Scales Stitch angleRow 4:  k30.

Row 5:  p3, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], repeat from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 6:  k30.

Row 7:  p3, k1, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], repeat from * to last 4 sts, k1, p3.

Rows 8-53:  Repeat Rows 4-7.

Row 54: k30.

Finishing Rows

Row 55: k30.

Row 56: p30.

Row 57: k30.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.  This particular square is worked a tad smaller than 8″ x 8″, so that once blocked, the pattern will open up to show the eyelets at their best.  A thorough soaking and pinning to the 8″ x 8″ measurement is required to achieve the proper size.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

6 Comments

  • I love the mermaid scale stitch. I have been searching for the “how to ” for this stitch. I am looking for a loom knitting pattern for the full mermaid tail for an adult and have had no luck finding one. Would you happen to have a pattern for the mermaid tail?

  • Hi Nancy! :) I’m so glad you like the stitch…I love the visual depths it produces, with so little effort! All the how-to information on this particular stitch is included in this post. ;)

    I will say that there is a terrific mermaid tail blanket for the looms released here:
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/loom-knit-mermaid-tail-blanket

    It uses the crocodile stitch, but you could substitute this Mermaid Scale stitch in place of it for a much simpler choice. I would love to see it when you have finished!

    Bethany~

  • This looks stunning. I’d like to make a scarf with this stitch. Would leaving off the garter edge on the sides make it curl? Thanks for the helpful video. I always look forward to your posts Bethany.

  • Oh, wonderful, Cindy! I’m so happy to hear this stitch (and the others) are well received…thank you!

    As for leaving off the garter borders, I think you will be ok. I didn’t notice any significant curling with this one, and it does require a bit of blocking to open up the stitch, which would also stop the curling. Just remember to use a wool, or another natural fiber that blocks well. :)

    Happy looming!
    Bethany~

  • Bethany, I love this stitch. My daughter in law wants a baby mermaid blanket as a photo prop. I believe this stitch will be perfect.
    Thank you for sharing.

  • Oh, I’m so glad you will find it useful, Carol! :) I can’t wait to see your finished mermaid blanket!

    Bethany~

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Jun 3, 2016

Double Knit 101-Part IV

Change of Color with Stripes and Design

There are many patterns in our free pattern library that incorporate stripes and fun intarsia designs.  Here are a few designs that you may recognize from our afghan patterns.  Let’s go over the basics in working with color changes and creating designs.

EXAMPLES OF CHANGE OF COLOR

Crayon Box Throw uses basic horizontal stripes.  These can be worked in any amount of rows, which will determine how thick the stripe will be.  The colors begin at start of a row and go to the end of the row.  Horizontal stripes can also be used to create a border at bottom and top of the knitted piece.

Vertical stripes are a bit different in that they are created with selected stitches and repeated on the same pins in each row.  With each row, the stripe grows longer.

They can also be used in just a few rows to create checker board designs.

painted_desert2__35124.1419381330.1280.1280

 

 

Painted Desert Afghan, uses vertical and horizontal stripes for the 2 color design and the border.  We used wide stripes to create the side panels.  The 3 panels were sewn together with the invisible stitch.

Checkerboard is created with vertical stripes for several rows and groups of stitches in one color, and then, by shifting the rows to different stitches,  for  several additional rows.  They can be created with just 2 colors or many.  If you are just exploring this concept, I would suggest starting with just a couple colors.  Tangled yarns can be frustrating-but we can talk about ways to assist with this when we start Intarsia                                                         .

afghan_new_daisyc__80278.1456511116.1280.1280

 

When we designed this large afghan, the New Daisy Afghan , we used a 2 color design by adding colors into the knit creating intarsia flowers.  The 2 color side panels were knit separately and all three strips were sewn together using invisible stitch.

 

 

chickie_blanket__89902.1419908673.1280.1280

 

In our Little Chickie Blanket, you can see how colors are used within the knit to create the ‘Chickie’.  Also vertical and horizontal stripes are used for the letters and the 2-tone stripe section.  This little blanket was knit is 3 strips, but the change of colors makes it look like squares.  The border was added as a separate piece and sewn on using invisible stitch.  This sewing stitch is illustrated in Part III tutorial.

 

 

INTARSIA

So what does ‘Intarsia’ really mean? According to wikipedia, it means a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colors.  In single knit, the main color is traditionally dropped behind the peg of a different color as in a slip stitch.  So at end of color design, the backside is a maze of yarn colors.  In double knit, its a bit different as the color changes are made between the 2 rows of stitches, so they are most often not seen;  but, the really great thing about double knit, is that the color design is seen on both sides.  This is why double knit intarsia afghans and scarves are so beautiful.

Basic Horizontal Stripe: We are working with blue and want to create a white stripe.  Pull the white thru the 3rd stitch in center of loom, just under the last row.  Keep the blue yarn attached as we will only make the white stripe about 3 rows wide.  Then we will continue with the blue again.  You will see in the photos that the blue yarn is moved slightly with each row, so it doesn’t get caught up in the white row.

tie to 3rd stitch

tie and lay yarn down

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

weave the white row

Work 3 rows with white yarn.  Once complete, lay white aside and work rows with the blue.  By keeping both yarns attached, we will be ready when we want to start some vertical stripes.  If you plan to do more than 3 or 4 rows of a color stripe, it may be best to cut the blue, tie white to blue at 3rd stitch, and then work with new color.  Then lay both yarn tails down and continue.

Once you weave and hook over the desired number of rows with the white stripe, lay the white aside and continue with the blue yarn.

new row of blue on white

Continue with the blue knit for as many rows as desired, and maybe change back to the white for another stripe, or maybe tie in another new color.

For now, let’s work 2 rows of the blue.  Keep both colors attached, because from here, we will be able to go right into some vertical stripes.

checkerboard

Here is an example of a scarf with horizontal, vertical, and checkerboard.

In this scarf, it is the same process as with the blue and white yarns.  We have blue knit with a 3 row white stripe, and then 2 rows of blue.  Now, let’s create vertical stripes to match the vertical stripes in the Checkerboard Scarf.

Vertical Stripes: Start vertical stripes by weaving the blue around 2 stitches, skip 2 stitches, blue for 2 stitches, skip 2 stitches, and continue to  the end of the piece.  See below example of full circular.  The row is worked in stockinette stitch, skipping the pegs where the white yarn will be worked in. The white yarn will fill in the stitches that were skipped.

start of verticle

 

full weave of vertical

 

 

 

 

Now add the white yarn in stockinette stitch.

You can see the previous row is already done.  By repeating this row with both colors, you will have vertical stripes growing with the knit.

 

white stripe:blue:verticle

 

 

Now, you may be wondering if we could do these vertical stripes with the white yarn in b/b stitch (back to back weaving).  When you are working only 2 stitches of a color, that is a good option also.  Or you may work the blue in b/b, and then weave the white in stockinette.  I think you are beginning to see how this can be expanded into multiple color designs.

 

checkerboard with knit

 

 

Checkerboard Design:

To create a checkerboard design, work the vertical stripe like above for 3 or 4 rows, the white loops over white, and blue over blue. Then alternate colors.  Now do 3 or 4 rows of blue where the white stitches were, and the white where the blue ones were.  See photo.  This will shift the vertical stripes into checkerboard like on the brown scarf above.  But lets look at how the weave will be different if we use some b/b stitches for clarity.

bb white w:blu

 

As you can see, the white stitches in back/back stitch look pretty much the same as stockinette only a little looser.

The best time to use the b/b weaving is within a piece of knit creating a small design.

Weave the white over b/b, 2 stitches, move across to next white stitches until all white stitches are covered.

b:b 2

Weave over the white stitches in stockinette in blue for a  full circular so that all pegs are covered.  Hook over.  Repeat.  Remember in doing any design, be sure to cast on amount of stitches to complete the sequence.  Here, we just want even amount of stitches, so the 2-stitch vertical stripe or checkerboard design comes out even.

blue over bb1

compkete blue over bb

 

 

 

 

 

 

When doing a knitted piece with a small design in it, you will tie on the color of design, close to where the stitches begin.  Work the color stitches in that row in b/b stitch.  Lay yarn down, and pick up main color and work in stockinette stitch. Work each row, one at a time, using the color sts when required keeping the yarn attached until the design is complete.  Tie to working yarn and cut. Weave in the color yarn tail.

We will dive into intarsia with graphs and multiple colors in another tutorial.  Next month, we will shift focus and see a few new double knit stitches that everyone of all skill levels can enjoy.

Double Knit Tutorial Series: Part I      Part II       Part III

 

2 Comments

  • Thank you for the great tutorial on double knit color change. My daughter and I were trying (with limited success) to change colors. I saw your Advent creations and they looked beautiful but I was afraid to try them. Now I have worked up to the second color change of the checkerboard and it looks great. I’ll be trying some of the Advent projects this fall! Thank you for teaching us. I had just two questions: in double knitting when one changes color is there a need to “twist” the yarns ? Secondly, what is back to back weaving? Thank you for the great instructions.

  • Hi Cindy, So happy that you and your daughter are enjoying colors in your knitting. The back to back or b/b weave is shown and explained in Part 1 and the link is at bottom of this tutorial. But this is also shown in this tutorial where the weaving is front to back rather than the stockinette. Thank you for asking about twisting the yarns, as it is important in color change. If you are working in stockinette where one color is across the weave of the other, you do not need to twist the yarns at the junction of 2 colors meeting. This is because the stockinette will lock the knit together. If, however, you are working in color blocks with 2 different yarns that are not woven over each other, you will want to twist them where they meet. Otherwise, the sections will not be connected in finished knit and will need some ‘sewing’ to connect them. You may find that if you are adding a small amount of a color in your design, it makes twisting easier to cut a small amount of yarn for that section rather than working with 2 large skeins of yarn.

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May 27, 2016

Silken Byways Handbag

Silken Byways Handbag-frontTraditional saris, woven with heavy silk and gold and silver cloth, are highly treasured and worn during special occasions and festivities within the Indian culture.

This vibrant and somewhat free spirited handbag is created using yarn made from recycled sari remnants…a wonderful way to enjoy the exquisite beauty of sari silk, with our more casual western ways in mind.

 

Loom:  Adjustable Hat Loom, 28 pegs in every other hole.

Yarn:  Approx 90 yards/143 g of bulky weight recycled sari silk ribbon yarn. Sample used SilkIndian Ribbon Yarn (1.5 skeins in the multi) 60 yds/100 g.

Notions:   knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, row counter, large decorative button, one tassel, one strap (sample uses a curtain tie-back cord).

Gauge: Approx 8 sts x 12.5 rows= 4 inches

Size:  7” high x 7” wide x 3.5” deep at base.

Abbreviations

Approx: approximately
sts: stitches
CO: cast on
EW: E-wrap stitch
KO: knit off
WY: working yarn
BO: bind off

Pattern Notes:
All knits are worked as E-wrap stitches throughout.  When working an EW with the ribbon yarn, be sure to wrap and knit off just one peg at a time.  Leave extra looseness in each wrap after knitting off, so that the following rows won’t be too tight to manage.

This pattern uses a Drawstring Cast On for ease in gathering the bottom of the bag.  Please see this helpful web tutorial for more details:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkTsM3WjKQU

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Set loom to work in the round using 28 pegs in every other hole.  Going in a COUNTER CLOCKWISE direction, Drawstring CO to all 28 pegs.

Rows 1-24:  Work very loose EW on all 28 pegs.

Row 25:  Basic BO pegs 1-14, EW pegs 15-28.

Row 26:  EW pegs 28-15.

**Note: The WY should now be on the left side of the pegs being worked. If it’s not, simply switch the diagram below to work as if a mirror opposite.

  

Row 27:  Using the peg diagram above, work the 2 left side decreases as follows:

  • *Move the loop from peg 2 to peg 3 and KO.
  • *Move the loop from peg 1 to peg 2.
  • *Basic BO peg 1.

*EW knit the remaining pegs in line. 

Silken Byways Handbag- close up edgeRow 28:  Basic BO first peg of row.  EW knit the remaining pegs in line.

Rows 29-33:  Repeat Rows 27 & 28.  When done, there will only be 3 pegs with loops remaining.

Row 34:  Basic BO first peg in row. EW and KO 4 times on peg 2 only.  Move loop from peg 2 to peg 3, KO.  Trim yarn and pull through loop.  Cinch tightly.

 

FINISHING

Pull tail at CO edge to gather until there remains a 2” opening.  Stitch this 2” opening closed so that it will lay flat and serve as the bag bottom.

Weave in all ends and trim any long threads from the ribbon yarn’s natural frays.  Feel free to stretch the bag and asymmetrical flap into shape.  The firm nature of the ribbon yarn allows for some adjustment of the knitting into the preferred form.

Stitch the button in place at the bag front just inside the button loop, along with the tassel, and handles of choice.

If desired, the bag can be lined, or it can be left in its natural state.

7 Comments

  • Is it possible to use any other type of loom? My hat loom pegs broke!

  • Oh no, Erin! I’m so sorry to hear that! :P This is one of the big reasons the pattern talks about making your stitches *very* loosely. But, as for another loom to use this project on, any one of a large gauge would do. Perhaps a loom with fixed pegs would be better for you. You might even try it on a Zippy, but you’d most likely need to line the bag after you’ve completed the knitting, as the stitches may have extra spaces between them. Best of wishes for your success! :)

  • Hi Erin, I would let the company know about the issue of your hat loom by email to info@knittingboard.com. They will be happy to discuss this with you.

  • Can the sashay yarn be used for this pattern?

  • Hi Kerri! :) Yes, the Sashay yarn held all bunched up as one strand of thick yarn would be a great match for this project…terrific idea! :)

  • Can you use the All in one loom to make this bag

  • Hi Margaret :)

    Well, you can use the All-n-One for this, but you would need to change the yarn used, as the silk ribbon used in the pattern would be too thick for the gauge of that loom. Then, of course, you may wish to change the number of pegs used and rows worked so that you end up with the size bag that you wish to have. ;) I would highly recommend making a swatch first and then doing a little math to determine the desired numbers.

    Best wishes! :)

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May 20, 2016

iPad Cozy

Ipad bag

Knit a fashionable iPad cozy to keep your iPad safe from bumps. The felted material also protects the iPad from unwanted spills.

LOOM:  Hat Loom, set at large gauge, at M size (40 pegs every other hole)

YARN:  Approx 275 yds of wool mohair blend bulky weight yarn. Lamb’s Pride Bulky in Cranberry Swirl (250yds) and Lime Sorbet (25 yds) was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, row marker (safety pin)

Other: Decorative button, approx 1/2″

GAUGE: 3.5 sts x 4 rows = 2 inches.

SIZE:  Pre-felted: 14.5″ W x  10.5″ H (including flap folded over the front)

Felted: 10″ W x 8″ H

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

Rep=Repeat

MC=Main color (Cranberry Swirl)

CC=Contrasting Color (Lime Sorbet)

INSTRUCTIONS Ipad Bag prefelted

Using MC, cast on 36 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1: ewrap k to end of row.

Row 2: p to end of row.

Row 1 and Row 2=1 Garter Stitch ridge.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2, until you have 48 Garter Stitch ridges

Next row: ewrap k to end of row.

Next row, BO 2, p to end. (Place a row marker at this point).

Rep last 2 rows until 8 sets rem.

BO with basic bind off method.

Fold the panel so that the cast on edge lines up with the row that has the stitch marker. Using tapestry needle and MC, mattress stitch down the sides. Weave ends in.

I-cord for flap

Using CC, work a 3-stitch i-cord that is approximately 24 inches long. Using tapestry needle and CC, mattress stitch the i-cord to the tapered flap of the bag, starting at the beginning of the tapered edge, loop the end of the i-cord to form a loop, secure to the edge of the flap.

Button

After felting (see instructions below for felting), fold the flap over to see where to place the button. Sample shows button at the bottom right of the flap. Sew the button in place to the bottom part of the bag. Fold flap over, with a knife of scissors make an opening to the flap, big enough to allow the button to pass through.

Ipad Bag Open Prefelted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assembly: using the mattress stitch, seam the icord to the cast on edge of the oven mitt. Create a small loop with the remaining icord (to use for hanging)

FELTING INSTRUCTIONS 

The magic in this knitting happens when you wash the untreated wool with hot water and the item shrinks, making the stitches smaller, and the fabric thicker.

You will need the following:

1 pillow case with a zipper

Safety Pin

2-3 jeans (to use in agitation)

Eucalan Woolwash or Baby Shampoo

Towels (to squeeze out excess water).

Top Loader Washer

INSTRUCTIONS

Place all items to be felted inside the zippered pillow case. Secure the zipper with the safety pin (to ensure the pillow case doesn’t open).

Set washer to Small load, and Hot temperature.

Place 1 tsp of Eucalan Woolwash or 1 tsp of Baby Shampoo.

Place the jeans inside the washer.

Place the pillow case inside the washer.

Start the washer. Check the washer again BEFORE it goes into the spin cycle. If the item is not the desired size, re-start the washer from the beginning (simply turn the knob back to the beginning of the wash). Place the pillow case back in the washer and let it go through another cycle, stopping the washer BEFORE it was through the spin cycle. Check again. If not desired size, repeat. *The above samples took 3 cycles.

Once the items are the desired size, remove the items from the pillow case. Take them to the sink. If you used Eucalan Woolwash, rinsing is not required. If you used Baby Shampoo, rinse in cold water. Do not wring the excess water. Place a towel on a flat surface, then place the felted item on top of the towel. Pat dry as much as you can.

Set the items to air dry, away from the sun. The sun may discolor the yarn.

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May 18, 2016

Plaid Rug from T-shirts

Designed by Lindsay Obermeyer

Rug_plaid

Needed

Size:  Rug 14″ x 22.5″ Each panel 7″ x 22.5″

Loom: All-n-One Loom or 28″ Loom, plus a set of loom extenders.

T-Shirts: 1 orange, yellow, peach, green and white t-shirts and 2 grey t-shirts with minimal text or graphics.

Notions: scissors, size J crochet hook, ruler, crochet cotton, such as Sugar and Cream in a color to match the t-shirts, Tapestry needle, ball headed pins

 

Panel one: Orange Plaid

Set up: make t-shirt loopies

©2016Obermeyer-t-shirt-loop-process

Fold the t-shirt in half , lining up the sleeves. Smooth out the wrinkles with your hand. Cut off the bottom band.   Measure and cut a 2” wide strip across the shirt through both layers. Trim off the seam ends. With the fabric still folded in half, cut a slit straight up the center until about a ¼ inch from the end. You now have 2 strips with slits up them. Round off the corners. Take one strip and pull it taught while holding onto each end. The strip will stretch, the edges will curl in and you now have a warp loopie.

Make 2 green warp loopies, 9 yellow and 9 orange warp loopies for a total of 20.

To make the weft loopies , Cut 8” x 2” strips of the t-shirt. (Use every scrap of the t-shirt, including sleeves). Fold each strip in half, cut a slit up the center and round off the edges.

Make 22 peach, 17 orange, 15 yellow weft loopies.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Warp the loom in the following color order 6 yellow, 1 green, 3 yellow, 3 orange, 1 green, 6 orange.

©2016LindsayObermeyerPlaidRug-weaving

Weft Color Pattern

Weave in a basic over and under manner the following color sequence:  5 orange, 1 green, 5 yellow 1 green 8 peach 1 green 6 orange, 1 green, 5 yellow, 8 peach, 1 green, 7 orange, 1 green, 5 yellow, 1 green, 7 peach.

Finishing / Binding off the fabric from the loom

When you finish weaving in the last strip, crochet bind off the fabric off of the loom. Use a J hook and lift the first loop on the top of the warp onto your hook, proceed and add the loop next to it. Then lift the first loop up and over the second loop, proceed to the third loop and place it on your hook, then take the 2nd loop and lift it up and over the third loop, you will continue in this fashion all the way around the loom, until only one loop remains on your hook. You will pull this loop and weave it into the structure of your weave using either your hook or a tapestry needle.

 

©2016Obermeyer-seaming-plaid

 

 

 

Seam your 2 pieces together with yarn and tapestry needle.

6 Comments

  • With the fabric still folded in half, cut a slit straight up the center until about a ¼ inch from the end. You now have 2 strips with slits up them—Do you have pics of this step? It’s a little confusing to me. =)

  • Thus reminds me of making potholders for my Mom @ the playground in summer. Thanks for the idea! :)

  • Hi Dana, Sorry we do not have pics of this step. I will send your question to the designer for you. Thanks.

  • Just a note for folks, was in Hobby Lobby the other day and notice they have T-shirt knit on a cone in different colors already cut. If anyone is interested.

  • Love this article. Your expertise is much appreciated. Thanks, Caroline

  • Would it be possible to make this using the sashay yarn instead of the recommended yarn? I have some left over with no use and don’t want to make scarves and its just sitting in my yarn bucket staring at me saying “when will I get used”

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May 16, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Is Laddering?

10940466_663261290449770_6723370072072730651_n

 

 

 

 

The first thing most people learn when learning to loom knit is how to work the e-wrap knit stitch.  Some people only use this stitch to create endless items.  It’s a very simple stitch that many prefer over the knit stitch or even learning the purl stitch.  Nothing wrong with that.  It is a knit stitch after all.  And an easy one.  Think I said that already.

But it has its drawbacks.  Beginners always have that same question when making hats or other items worked in the round.  Why do I have a large gap between the first and last stitch?  It only happens with e-wrap worked in the round.  Never with flat panels.  Why is that?  It really is a simple answer.  Let’s talk about the laddering effect.

What is laddering?

Laddering is that gap between the first and last stitch of a project worked in the round when using the e-wrap knit stitch when the entire loom is wrapped before knitting over.  It leaves the yarn between the stitches in horizontal lines that looks like a ladder.  Hence the name.

Here is an example of laddering:

Ladder effect with e-wrap knit stitch

Ladder effect with e-wrap knit stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why does it happen?

Laddering happens when all the pegs on the entire loom are wrapped then knit over.  This is due to each stitch getting looser has the bottom loop is lifted over the top loop.  It is actually on the round below, not the round just wrapped.  With the twist in the stitch, each stitch gets pulled a little when knit over making the next one a little looser when it is knit over.  And so on until you end the round with that extra between the first and last stitch.  By the time the last stitch is worked, there is enough of a gap to be noticed.

This is why it doesn’t happen with flat panels.  The extra bit that creates the ladder when working in the round ends up at the edge.

Sometimes this will not happen with bulkier yarns especially if the yarn is slightly bulkier than the loom gauge requires.

Is it due to tension?

Tension is not really the issue when it comes to laddering.  Some people like to use yarn guides or empty pens to make it faster to wrap the pegs.  This will not prevent laddering.  Laddering happens when knitting over, not how tight you wrap the pegs.

But why is mine laddering between all the stitches??

If using a smaller yarn weight than the loom gauge like using 1 strand of worsted with a large gauge loom, laddering will happen between each stitch with e-wrap whether in the round or a flat panel.  The twist in the stitch will keep the stitches from pulling together when off the loom.

Example of 1 strand worsted on large gauge loom

Example of 1 strand worsted on large gauge loom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This effect is sometimes desired for lacier projects.  But if it’s not desired, make sure the yarn weight matches the gauge of the loom.  Learn more on yarn weights and which gauge loom to use here.

How do I prevent laddering in my work?

The best way to prevent laddering is one not often preferred.  That is to wrap and knit over each peg as you go.  That way each stitch is exactly the same.  But most people prefer to wrap the loom first.  And that leads us to the next question.

Are there other ways to prevent it without working each peg as you go?

Some people say to start and stop at different pegs on each round.  That will work as long as those pegs that you are stopping at are not next to each other.  If you stop at the one before the last peg you stopped at on the previous round, the laddering will be on a diagonal instead of vertical.

If you wrap the pegs in shorter sections then knit over before going on to the next section, the amount of yarn that is made loose is not as much and therefore not as noticed.  If you wrap only 5 to 10 pegs at a time, the laddering effect will not happen.

Will it “fix” itself if left alone?

Yes.  Most times, if the item is given time to relax, the stitches will “fix” themselves, and the ladder will disappear.   Blocking will help too depending on the fiber used.

 

While I am not one to use e-wrap knit stitch very often, it is a wonderful stitch that can add texture or is just easy to work.  If you are ready to make that next step to a different knit stitch, please check out my article Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch?

Until next time!  Happy loom knitting!

3 Comments

  • This is very good article. I will definitely add this to my “need to know” folder.

  • Thanks Jonnita.

  • Wrap and knit over each peg as you go is the only way I do Ewrap knit, both as flat panel and in the round. It makes a tremendous difference. I also use it as a cast on and the result is less loopy than the traditional Ewrap cast on. This method works great on hats too. Thanks for the great article.

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May 15, 2016

Springtime Yoga Bag

yogabag2Springtime is here! The birds are chirping, the sun welcomes us each morning with is warm rays. It is the perfect time to grab that yoga mat and head to the nearest park to enjoy a relaxing yoga class.

LOOM:  Hat Loom, set at small gauge, at XS size (56 pegs)

YARN:  Approx 250 yds of cotton worsted weight yarn. Bernat Handicrafter Cotton in Nautical was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, crochet hook size D.

GAUGE: 7 sts x 12 rows = 2 inches.

SIZE:  Fits a 24” width yoga mat.  

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

k2tog=knit two stitches together

YO=Yarn over (Ewrap the empty peg, on the following round, undo the ewrap and place this stitch in front of the peg and then work it as instructed (this pattern indicates to knit the peg)).

INSTRUCTIONS

Bag

Cast on 56 sts, join to work in the rnd.

Row 1: p to end of rnd.

Row 2: k to end of rnd.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: 2 more times.

Next rnd: *k2tog, yo; rep from * to end of rnd.

Next rnd: p to end of rnd.

Next rnd: k to end of rnd.

Rep last 2 rnds: 2 more times.

Next rnd: *k2tog, yo; rep from * to end of rnd.

Next rnd: k to end of rnd.

Rep from ** to **: until panel measures: 24 inches from cast on edge.

Bind off with gather removal method.

Strap

Cast on 7 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1: Sl1, k to end of row.

Row 2: Sl1, p5, k1.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: until strap measures 30 inches long.

Bind off with basic bind off.

Secure strap to the bag.

Crochet cord

With size D crochet hook, crochet a chain that is about 24 inches long. Bind off. Pass the cord through the eyelet openings through the garter stitch border. Make a knot at each end of the cord.

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May 9, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Lollipop

Whimsical Loom Knits – May 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

IMG_3515

This adorable lollipop is quick, easy, and so much fun to make!  Plus, it is a fantastic way to use up little bits of yarn left over from other projects.  Whip up a scrumptious batch of lollipops in all of your favorite ‘flavors’!

 

Knitting Loom: KB Hat Loom

Yarn: Worsted weight cotton yarn.  Peaches & Crème was used for the samples.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, tape measure, hot glue gun and glue sticks, 4” lollipop sticks, scrap of felt.

Gauge: Not critical for this project.

Finished Measurements: Approximately 1 ¾ “ in diameter (excluding the stick)

 

Instructions

Create a 3 peg i-cord:  Leave a 14” yarn tail.  Make a slip knot and place it on the first peg.  Wrap the 2nd peg and the 3rd peg.  *Take the working yarn behind the 2nd peg and the 1st peg.  Bring the working yarn around the front of the first peg and lay it across pegs 1, 2, and 3 – above the loops that are already on the pegs.  Knit the 3rd peg, the 1st peg, and then the 2nd peg.  Repeat from * five times.  Gently pull on the i-cord to help set the stitches in place and lengthen the cord.  Continue working in this manner until the i-cord measures 10” in length.

Bind off:  Move the stitch on peg 1 to peg 2.  Knit peg 2.  Move the stitch on peg 3 to peg 2.  Knit peg 2.    Cut the working yarn.  Lay the yarn tail across the front of peg 2.  Knit the last stitch over the yarn tail and pull the yarn tail out through the stitch.  Gently pull on the yarn tail to tighten up the bind off.

 

Finishing

Begin shaping the i-cord into a coil:  Thread the 14” yarn tail into the eye of the yarn needle.  Pull the yarn needle through the i-cord, approximately ¾ of an inch from the end.

IMG_3507

Continue coiling and stitching the i-cord into a spiral.

IMG_3508

IMG_3509

Once the i-cord has been shaped into a spiral, weave in both yarn tails.

IMG_3510

Using the hot glue gun, glue a sucker stick to the back of the spiral.

IMG_3511

Cut a circle from the felt and glue it over the sucker stick.

IMG_3512

All done!  Easy Peasy!

 

IMG_3514

Enjoy!

 

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May 2, 2016

Stitchology 21 : Bunnies on Parade

Spring has sprung and apparently I can’t think about anything other than sweet little bunny rabbits while knitting!  I simply meant to do an interesting new technique for May’s Stitchology, and guess what?  It came out with bunnies prancing across the square in neat and orderly rows. I’m definitely not one to deny my love for those furry creatures, so bunny rabbits it is! :)  The neat thing about this stitch is that the backside is really pretty too, and looks like an entirely different stitch altogether.  Because of this, Bunnies on Parade would be a terrific stitch for making items that can be reversible such as blankets, hats, scarves…you name it!

It’s Reversible!

Back Side of Stitch

Back Side of Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Bunnies on Parade Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in banane)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

 

Pattern Notes:

This versatile stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to pretty much any type of project.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 2—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The abbreviation “rep” stands for “repeat”.

The abbreviation “wy” stands for “working yarn”.

 

*There are two types of Slip Stitches in this stitch pattern.  They are worked in the following ways:

s1: Slip one stitch with working yarn in back (worked over one peg) 

How to do it: *Simply carry the working yarn behind the peg, without working the loop on the peg.

s2wyif/p2:  Slip two stitches with working yarn in front, then purl the same two stitches (worked over 2 pegs, from right to left)

How to do it

*Lift the loop from peg #1 and carry the working yarn in the space in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace held loop. Repeat for peg #2.

*Bring the working yarn around to the back of peg #2, and carry behind both pegs #2 and #1, finally bringing around to the front of peg #1 again.

*Purl pegs #1 and #2.

**Note: See the tutorial video at the bottom of this post for a more visual instruction tool. 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Stitchology 21- Square

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

 

Step by Step Instructions:

Bunnies on Parade-close back

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 40 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  P40

Row 2:  K40

Row 3:  P40

Row 4:  K40

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: P3, *s2wyif/p2, rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 6: K3, *p1, s1, rep from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 7: P3, *s1, p1, rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 8: K40

Rows 9-68:  Rep Rows 5-8.

Finishing Rows

Row 69: P40

Row 70:  K40

Row 71:  P40

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

 

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

2 Comments

  • I’m wanting to make a shaw with finger lace weight yarn using the “star stitch.” I have only found 1 video on you tube but it’s using a “bulky” yarn. But I’m afraid that my loom’s & that the yarn is to fine for my project. Do you think my project “can” be completed on a loom? I’m afraid that because my yarn is to fine it may not work!
    Thank you for your time.
    CH

  • Hi Cindy :)

    I think it would be possible, but you will need to match your yarn with the properly gauged loom. A fine gauge, or extra fine gauge loom might be the best for you. You can always try a small section of the pattern as a swatch to see how it will come out…only way to know for sure if you like the results. ;)

    Best of luck to you!

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