Oct 29, 2016

Crossed Paths Cap

A hat to keep you cozy warm while on the trails or out and about town in the cool weather seasons. This unisex design is high on style and low on difficulty level, with its one and only row of cable design to really make this hat pop!

Knitting Loom: Adjustable Hat Loom set to the large size, 84 pegs, with pegs in each hole.

Yarn: Approximately 140 yards of worsted weight yarn. Sample used handspun yarn 50% merino wool 50% alpaca.

Notions: knitting tool, cable needle, one removable stitch marker, 6mm crochet hook (for cast on and help with possible missed stitches, etc), scissors, knitting pins, yarn needle, row counter.

Gauge: 4 sts x 7.5 rows= 1 inch (in pattern, using U-Stitch).

Finished Measurements: Circumference: 21″,  Height: 10″.

Skills Needed: Knit/U-stitch, Purl, 6st-rc/kpk Cable (described in Pattern Notes), Chain Cast On (or CO of your choice).

Abbreviations:
CO: cast on
Rnd(s): round(s)
Rep: repeat
K: knit stitch/U-stitch
P: purl stitch
KO: knit off
St(s): stitches
WY: working yarn
CO: cast on
6st-rc/kpk: 6 stitch right cross cable, k2, p2, k2
BO: bind off

Pattern Notes:
This pattern uses 1 strand of yarn held throughout.

For the sample, all knit stitches were made using the U-stitch. Work whichever type of knit stitch helps you achieve the proper gauge.

Flat Drawstring Bind Off tutorial (instructions for this specific hat are included in the Finishing section below…video is listed for a helpful visual).

The cables in this pattern involve trading the loops of 6 pegs in the correct order.They are all worked the same—as right cross cables (a twist with the sts running to the right) with both knit and purl stitches combined.  They are worked as follows:

*Note: It helps to knit the row before the cable row looser than normal to aid the cable stitches in stretching to their new places. It may help to ewrap the first 2 and the last 2 stitches that will be worked into the cable in the following row, just make sure to untwist the ewraps before knitting them into the cables.

[6st-rc/kpk]:  Worked over 6 pegs, from right to left (6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1):

  • -Lift the loops from the first 4 pegs of the cable (1-4) and place them on the cable needle.
  • -Bring your working yarn behind pegs 1-4 and knit the stitch on peg 5.
  • -Move this stitch (peg 5) over to peg 1 of the cable pegs.  Pull out any slack in the yarn that is allowable at this point.
  • -Bring your working yarn behind pegs 2-5 and knit the stitch on peg 6.
  • -Move this stitch (peg 6) over to peg 2 of the cable pegs.  Pull out any slack in the yarn that is allowable at this point.
  • -Lift the first stitch from the cable needle that was previously on peg 4 and move it back to peg 4.
  • -Lift the second stitch from the cable needle that was previously on peg 3 and move it back to peg 3.  Purl these 2 stitches (pegs 3 & 4).
  • -Lift the stitch from the cable needle that was previously on peg 1 and move it to peg 5.  Knit this stitch.
  • -Lift the last stitch from the cable needle that was previously on peg 2 and move it to peg 6.  Knit this stitch.
  • -Work out any slack that may be left throughout the 6 cable stitches.

chart-key-crossed-paths-cap

Repeating Pattern Rows

(This chart details the 14 repeating pattern stitches in the round.  The rows in the chart detail how they are worked to Row 32.  Row 32 is then repeated to Row 62, then the crown shaping begins, as is shown in the pattern instructions below.)

crossed-paths-cap-chart

Instructions

Crossed Paths Cap with tree

Set loom to use 84 pegs, with pegs set in every hole.  CO onto all pegs in the round.

Rnds 1-10: *k2, p3, k2, p2, k2, p3, rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnds 11-16: Repeat the following 2 row pattern: 

Row A: k84

Row B: p84

Rnds 17-20: Rep Rnd 1. (As stated in Pattern Notes, knit Rnd 20 loosely.)

Rnd 21: *k2, p3, 6st-rc/kpk, p3, rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnds 22-25: Rep Rnd 1.

Rnds 26-31: rep Rnds 11-16.

Rnds 32-62: Rep Rdn 1.

Crown Decreasing:

Rnd 63:  Decrease at every section of 3 purls together for a total of 12 decreases in the following way:

Move the center purl loops over one peg and purl 2 loops together as 1 while working the row below. The spaces can be just left alone and the yarn carried behind the empty pegs, or each 3 peg connector can be removed from the loom and the sts moved to fill in all the empty pegs.  If the loom sections are removed, the loom will now be unconnected on the sides, but it is still held together by the knitting, so can continue to be worked.

Work the rnd as follows:  *k2, p2, rep from * to end of rnd. (Purl the pegs with 2 loops as if they are 1.)

Rnds 64-68:  *k2, p2, rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 69:  Decrease at every section of 2 knit pairs for a total of 18 decreases in the following way:

At every pair of knit stitches, move one knit loop over to the other knit peg and knit 2 loops together as 1 while working the row below. Each 11 peg connector can be removed from the loom and replaced with a 3 peg connector on each side. Shift the sts to fill in all the empty pegs, but there will still be 2 pegs left empty.  Situate these 2 empty pegs so that one is placed in between 2 different sets of purl pegs.

Work the rnd as follows:  *k1, p2, rep from * to end of rnd. (Knit the pegs with 2 loops, 2 over 1.)

Rnds 70-74:  *k1, p2, rep from * to end of rnd.

Finishing

Crossed Paths Tree back

  • -Wrap WY around the loom twice and cut at this point.
  • -Add a yarn needle and thread through every purl st in order, trailing the WY behind the knit pegs. Release all purl sts from their pegs.  Give the WY a gentle pull to add tension on all the purl sts.
  • -Add a removable stitch marker onto your WY at this point.
  • -Thread through every knit st in order, releasing them from their pegs.
  • -Firmly pull the yarn tail section that is before the stitch marker, so that all the purl sts are now completely gathered closed.
  • -While keeping this section tight, firmly gather the remaining knit sts closed and knot in place. (Remove the stitch marker just before completely closing the knit sts section.) Sew closed any opening still remaining.
  • -Pull tail to the inside of the hat and knot the purl gathers securely in place.

Weave in all ends and block to size preferred.

To leave a question or comment for Bethany Dailey, simply add your comments to the section below! :)

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Oct 24, 2016

Loom Weaving: Rya Knots

Rya Knot Weave on a Knitting Loom!Rya knots go with weaving like ice cream and apple pie. You can use rya knots in your weavings to make pops of texture, to make a shag weave, or to add a gorgeous fringe. I’ve paired a fluffy hand-spun yarn with a golden warp thread to make a dreamy weave.

Loom: All-in-One Loom & 20-Peg-Extenders

Yarn: Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton Classic Size 10 in metallic gold is used for the warp. Along with a hand-spun Merino wool thick n’ thin in color Antler from AmandaJFrench on Etsy is used for the weave.

Notions: tapestry needle, wooden dowel rod

Rya Knot Steps:

Rya Knot Weave on a Knitting Loom!Step 1: Cut a length of thread that is twice as long as you want your rya knot to hang.

Step 2: Bring the middle of the thread over two warp threads.

Step 3: Take left side of the thread and pass it around the warp thread on the left and pull it up so that it is between the left warp thread and the right warp thread.

Rya Knot Weave on a Knitting Loom!Step 4: Now take the right side of the thread, pass it around the warp thread on the right and pull it up so that it also is between the left warp thread and the right warp thread.

Step 5: Pull both the thread ends evenly so that they pull tight against the warp threads creating a rya knot.

Tip: once you have made all your rya knots, weave at least 2 rows of plain weave to secure the knots and tighten them as necessary.

White & Gold Wall Hanging Pattern:

Set up your weave as described here. Double knot your warp thread on pin #2 from the bottom left. Warp your loom so that 18 pins are warp across the top and 19 pins are warped on the bottom, which includes your beginning double knot and your ending double knot of the warp thread. Tie your anchor thread across the top of the warp loops.

Weave 22 rows of the plain weave using your white yarn. This makes the body of the weave.

Rya Knot Weave on a Knitting Loom!Next to create the diagonal rya knots, follow this:

  • Cut 3 pieces of the white thread 18 inches long. Using 2 warp threads each, tie three rya knots starting on the right side.
  • Cut 3 pieces of white thread 14 inches long. Tie 3 more rya knots.
  • Cut 2 pieces 12 inches long, tie 2 more rya knots
  • Cut 3 pieces 8 inches long, tie 3 more rya knots
  • Cut 3 pieces 6 inches long, tie the 3 in rya knots
  • Cut 2 pieces 4 inches long, tie the 2 in rya knots

Now that all the warp threads have rya knots tied on them, weave two rows of plain weave below the rya knots.

Rya Knot Weave on a Knitting Loom!Following the similar finishing instructions here, cut your bottom warp threads about an inch from the bottom of the longest rya knot thread.  The golden warp thread will be all one length across and will peek out as the white thread is at a diagonal.  Tie 2 warp threads into a single knot, making sure they are tight against the bottom plain weave row to finish. Carefully remove the top warp loops from the loom pegs, then twist each one and put the dowel rod through the loops.

Enjoy your white and gold weave!

Happy Weaving!

Kate from The Weaving Loom (a blog dedicated to helping others learn to weave)

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Oct 23, 2016

Men’s Striped Socks

men-socks-2

Using a superb self-striping yarn allows you to simply knit at your heart’s content without having to worry about color changes.

KNITTING LOOM:  Sock Loom 2

YARN:  Approx 275 yds of DK weight yarn.  Viking Aurora Super Sock in color #668 was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, 2 double pointed needles size 2 (used for grafting the toe area close).

SIZE:  Fits a men’s size 9. To create larger/smaller sizes, work less rounds in the foot area.

GAUGE:  12.5 sts x 16 rows= 2 inches in stockinette.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

W&T=wrap and turn (remove stitch from the peg, wrap the yarn working yarn around the peg (take the yarn to the inside of the loom, then go around the peg so that working yarn ends up to the front of the loom)).

men-socks

INSTRUCTIONS
(make 2)

Cast on 48 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1-16: *k2, p2; rep from * to end of rnd.

Next 56 rnds: k to end of rnd.

Heel

Short-row heel over 24 pegs

Knit from peg 1-23. W&T peg 24

Knit from peg 23-2. W&T peg 1

Knit from peg 2-22. W&T peg 23

Knit from peg 22-3. W&T peg 2

Knit from peg 3-21. W&T peg 22

Knit from peg 21-4. W&T peg 3

Knit from peg 4-20. W&T peg 21

Knit from peg 20-5. W&T peg 4

Knit from peg 5-19. W&T peg 20

Knit from peg 19-6. W&T peg 5

Knit from peg 6-18. W&T peg 19

Knit from peg 18-7. W&T peg 6

Knit from peg 7-19 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 20

Knit from peg 19-6 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 5 (two wraps and a stitch)

Knit from peg 6-20(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 21 (two wraps and the stitch)

Knit from peg 20-5 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 4 (two wraps and a stitch)

Knit from peg 5-21 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 22 (two wraps and a stitch)

Knit from peg 21-4 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 3 (two wraps and a stitch)

Knit from peg 4-22(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 23 (two wraps and a stitch)

Knit from peg 22-3 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 2 (two wraps and a stitch)

Knit from peg 3-23(treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop) . W&T peg 24 (two wraps and a stitch)

Knit from peg 23-2 (treat the wrap and the stitch as one loop). W&T peg 1 (two wraps and a stitch).

Pegs 1 and 24 have the wraps and the stitch. On the first round for the foot, work the wraps and the stitch together as a regular stitch.

Sole and Foot

Next row: k to end of rnd.

Rep last rnd until foot measures approx 8.5 inches from the end of heel (or 1.5 inches less than desired length).

Toe

Rep short-row heel instructions for toe area.

At the end, you will have Peg 1 and peg 24 with an extra wrap, lift this wrap up and off the peg.

Grafting the Toe Close

Remove stitches 48-25 and place stitches on one double pointed needle. Remove the remaining stitches from the loom and place them on second double pointed needle.

Using the kitchener stitch, graft the toes close.

 

 

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Oct 17, 2016

Loom FAQs: How do I decrease crowns of hats?

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One of the first things that people learn to knit on looms are hats.  But due to the nature of knitting looms, these hats are made as a tube then gathered at the top.  These hats are always bulky at the top due to the gathering.  I have seen people ask “how do I keep the tops from being too bulky?”  “Is there a way to decrease the top of a hat?”  “Can I make the hat top down like in needle patterns?”

So is there a way?  While there are some techniques that help keep the bulk of gathering a tube on a knitting loom, there is also a way to decrease the top of a hat so that the crown is smooth.

hat-decrease

Hat with decreased crown knit on the All-n-One loom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What loom can I use to decrease?

You will need an adjustable loom in order to decrease the top of a hat.  While it may be achieved by using various round looms, getting the peg count correct is the tricky part.  You need a loom that can adjust the exact number of pegs you need after each decrease round.

The All-n-One loom is one such loom.  The sliders make it easy to adjust to any peg count as you decrease.

Can I just start at the top of the hat and increase instead of decreasing?

Yes.  But I feel that decreasing is easier than increasing.  Therefore, I will demonstrate how to work a hat from the brim up then decrease the top.

Is it hard to decrease the top of a hat?

It really isn’t that hard to decrease on the All-n-One loom.  It does take a bit more effort and time to do it.  But that smooth crown is worth the effort.

How do I decrease?  

While there are various stitch counts and methods of decreasing a crown, there is one gradual decrease that I like best.

The decrease can be worked with a stitch count that is divisible by either 6 or 8.  While I prefer to work the gradual decrease when the stitch multiples are 8, a stitch count with a multiple of 6 can be done as well.  It is personal preference.  I will include instructions for both.

What does a multiple of 8 stitches mean?

If the total stitch count can be evenly divided by 8 then it is a multiple of 8.  Common hat sizes in small gauge using medium/worsted weight yarn that are multiples of 8 are 72 and 80 pegs for adults, 72 and 64 pegs for youth, 56 and 64 pegs for toddler/child, 48 and 56 pegs for baby.

Gradual Decrease

The loom will need to be adjusted down in size BEFORE each decrease round.

Remove the work by placing each stitch on a lifeline.  A lifeline is a piece of yarn that is about 40 inches for a hat that is in a contrasting color.  Run the lifeline through each stitch starting with peg 1 and ending with the last peg.  Then remove the work from the loom.

Adjust the loom to the smaller size.  Then place each stitch back on the loom following the row that you are on.  Place each stitch that is to be knitted one by one then placing 2 loops for the K2tog (knit 2 together).  Continue until all the loops are back on the loom.

When placing the stitches on the peg for the K2tog, always place the stitches in the same order.  If the stitches are not always placed on the peg in the same order, the decreases will not all slant in the same direction making the finished product not a clean looking.

Then work the round.

The loom can be adjusted with the work still on the loom.  If this is done, I would recommend using a yarn that has some stretch to it.  First you will need to move all the stitches for the K2tog.  Then start from the slider ends and move the stitches inward while moving the sliders to fill in the empty pegs.  If using stitch markers, they will need to be moved as well so that the k2tog will always happen in the same place each time.

The loom will be at the smallest before the last decrease round.  It will be fine to have the stitches every other peg for that last decrease round.  Just be sure and bring the working yarn behind the empty peg before working the next stitch.

The last rows will be worked in stockinette.

Here are the abbreviations.

K – knit

K2tog – knit 2 together

Rnd – round

Rep – repeat

Multiple of 8 Stitch Count Decrease

Start your decrease when you have 14 rounds left on your hat.

Rnd 1:  *K6, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 2:  K all

Rnd 3:  *K5, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 4:  K all

Rnd 5:  *K4, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 6:  K all

Rnd 7:  *K3, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 8:  K all

Rnd 9:  *K2, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 10:  K all

Rnd 11:  *K1, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 12:  K all

Rnd 13:  *K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 14:  K all

Gather remaining stitches and secure.

Multiple of 6 Stitch Count Decrease

Start your decrease when you have 10 rounds left on your hat.

Rnd 1:  *K4, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 2:  K all

Rnd 3:  *K3, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 4:  K all

Rnd 5:  *K2, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 6:  K all

Rnd 7:  *K1, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 8:  K all

Rnd 9:  *K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 10:  K all

Gather remaining stitches and secure.

hat-decrease-crown

 

 

Now you have a nicely domed crown for your lovely knitting hat!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Never be afraid of trying something new!  Enjoy the knit!

6 Comments

  • Thanks for the info! Can’t wait to try it with my next hat!

  • Hi I have a question on the k2tog say like example
    You knit 4 pegs then do you take one of the stitches
    From the next peg after you knit 4 and move it over to
    The next peg and then knit that peg and the keep repeating
    Knit4 the k2tog together to decrease and continue the the other
    Instructions as follow for each row I just get mixed up about the k2tog
    Thing

    Sherri Ristow

  • I am so glad you can decrease stitches by using your loom. I have avoided making hats because I didn’t like the tube style hats was all you can make. Now to find some patterns. Thank you for the tutorial.

  • How did you know I had been trying to figure this out?! Thank you so much for helping my brain. Now can you tell me how to increase.

  • Sherri,

    When you k2tog, you are literally knitting 2 stitches together. How you do that is, as in the first round of decreases that you mentioned, you knit the stitches on pegs 1 – 4. When you get to peg 5, you move the stitch from peg 6 to peg 5 so that there are 2 stitches on that peg and knit both loops over as one. If you are using the lifeline method to remove the hat, adjust the loom, and then replace the stitches, you will do as follows. After the hat is off the loom and the loom is adjusted to the smaller size, you will put the stitches back on pegs 1 – 4. Then you will place the next 2 loops on peg 5. Continue with the next 4 stitches on the next 4 pegs, pegs 6 – 9, and then 2 stitches on the 10th peg. Continue around the loom. After all the stitches are back on the loom, knit then entire round, treating the pegs with 2 loops as 1.

    I hope that helps clarify the k2tog for you.

    Renita

  • Thanks for this, I am going to give it a try. I have been making hats and have released the bulk at the end by making the last 8 rows an k3 p3 or k4 p4 repeat depending on the design multiples. and then cinch off the purls first then pick up the knits to finish off the closure.

    This style will be much nicer of a finish.

    Thanks again

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Oct 15, 2016

Zippy Twisted Rope Scarf

0161

Fall is finally here! Time to take out the scarfs, hats, and mittens! Perfect time to knit a luscious knit for the guys’ in our lives! Whenever I think men knits, cables come to mind and this time with the Zippy loom to create a thick, warm scarf. A simple, yet attractive rope cable twists around the body of this scarf. Although it looks intricate to create, the two stitch twists are rather simple and provide with a tight cable.

Photo credit: Wendell Pace. Website: pacephoto.com

LOOM:  Zippy Master (17 pegs used)

YARN:  Approx 225 yds of super bulky weight yarn (#7).  Lion Brand Color Clouds yarn in Traveler’s Yarn was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, cable needle (optional).

GAUGE: 5 sts and 8 rows  = 4 inches in stockinette.

SIZE: 11 x 68 inches (not counting tassels)

ABBREVIATIONS

approx=approximate

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BBO=Basic Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

RT=Take loop off first peg and hold it to the center of the loom on the cable needle. Knit peg 2. Move loop from second peg to peg 1. Place loop from cable needle on peg 2. Knit peg 2.

LT=Skip peg 1 with yarn behind the peg. Knit peg 2. Move loop from peg 2 to cable needle and hold to center of loom. Knit peg 1. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Place loop from cable needle on peg 1.

RTP=Take loop off first peg and hold it to the center of the loom on the cable needle. Knit peg 2. Move loop from second peg to peg 1. Place loop from cable needle on peg 2. Purl peg 2.

LTP=Skip peg 1 with yarn behind the peg. Purl peg 2. Move loop from peg 2 to cable needle and hold to center of loom. Knit peg 1. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Place loop from cable needle on peg 1.

0149

INSTRUCTIONS

Cast on 17 sts from right to left. First row will be worked from left to right.

Row 1-4: *k1, p1; rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 5: k3, p3, k2, p4, k1, p1, k3.

Row 6: p3, p1, LTP, p2, RTP, LTP, p2, p3.

Row 7: k3, p2, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p2, k3.

Row 8: p3, p2, LTP, RTP, p2, LTP, p1, p3.

Row 9: k3, p1, k1, p4, k2, p3, k3.

Row 10: p3, p3, RT, p4, k1, p1, p3.

Row 11: k3, p1, k1, p4, k2, p3, k3.

Row 12: p3, p2, RTP, LTP, p2, RTP, p1, p3.

Row 13: k3, p2, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p2, k3.

Row 14: p3, p1, RTP, p2, LTP, RTP, p2, p3.

Row 15: k3, p3, k2, p4, k1, p1, k3.

Row 16: p3, p1, k1, p4, LT, p3, p3.

Rep Row 5-16 until you have reached approx. 66 inches from cast on edge.

Next 4 rows: *k1, p1; rep from * to last st, k1.

BBO. Weave ends in.

 

 

FINISHING

Fringes: Cut 34 pieces of yarn that are about 10 inches in length each.

Add 17 fringes to cast on edge. Add the remaining 17 fringes to the bind off edge.

  • Fold the strand of yarn for one fringe in half, forming a small loop at one edge (make sure the ends on the other end of the strand match in length).
  • Use crochet hook and draw the loop through the single crochet stitch where you are attaching the fringe to.
  • Now catch the loose ends of the yarn strand through the loop (thus creating the loop)
  • Tighten the knot by pulling gently on the fringe ends with your hand and holding the knot with the other hand.
  • Trim the ends if necessary to make all the tassels/fringes the same length.

 

 

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Oct 10, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Mini Gnome

Whimsical Loom Knits – October 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

This charming little gnome can be created in an afternoon.  This quick little project is so much fun, you’ll want to make an entire clan of mini gnomes.  Have fun!

img_3657

Knitting Loom: KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Small amounts of worsted weight yarn in various colors.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle.

Other Materials: 3″ wood peg doll, glue gun and glue, black paint for eyes.

Gauge: Not critical for this project.

 

Instructions

Robe:

Use worsted weight yarn in the color of your choice.  Leave a slightly longer yarn tail and cast on 14 pegs:

Rows 1-10:  E-wrap to end of row.

Bind off using the basic bind off method.  Leave a long yarn tail.  Using the long yarn tail from the bind off, seam the two edges of the panel together, creating a tube.  Weave in the yarn end.  Slip the tube onto the body of one of the wood dolls from the Peg Pair package.  Using the yarn tail from the cast on, gather the neckline of the robe and cinch it snug around the wood doll’s neck.  Weave in the yarn end and set the doll aside for now.

 

Hat:

Use worsted weight yarn in the color of your choice.  Leave a long yarn tail and cast on 12 pegs:

Row 1:  K2, P2 to end of row.

Row 1:  P2, K2 to end of row.

Rows 3-5:  E-wrap to the end of the row.

Row 6:  K2tog, E-wrap to the end of the row.

Repeat row 6 until there are only 2 stitches left on the loom.

Next row:  K2tog.

Fasten off the last stitch remaining on the loom and remove the hat from the loom.  Using the long tail from the cast on, seam the edges of the panel together, forming a pointed hat.  Weave in both yarn ends and set the hat aside for now.

 

Face and Beard:

Dip a pencil in the black paint.  Create eyes: use the pencil to add two dots to the wood doll.

img_3651

Cut six 3” lengths of white or gray worsted weight yarn.  Use the glue gun to adhere them to the face, below the eyes.

img_3652

Untwist the yarn strands (use the pick tool to help with this, if you like) and trim the beard to the desired length and shape.

 

Hair:

Cut twelve 5” lengths of the same yarn.  Use the glue gun to adhere them to the top of the head.

img_3654

Untwist the yarn strands and trim the hair to the desired length and shape.

Place the hat on the doll’s head.

Adorable!

img_3659

 

ps -the little mushroom house shown in the main photo for this pattern was created using a small oatmeal container.  The container was turned upside down and covered in white felt.  A little tan felt door was glued to the front of the container.  The top of a metal brad was used as a door knob for the little door.  The container is topped off with a red yarn cap that was lightly stuffed so the cap would hold its shape better.   Small white circles of felt were glued to the red yarn cap.  Add any other desired decorations and you have a pretty sweet house for your mini gnome :)

4 Comments

  • I am so into the Gnome , & seeing this, never thought of knitting one. . Thank You for this Special little Gnome. I Will Absolutely make this for ME , , LOL <3

  • This is so absolutely darling, Jenny!!! :D I love this little Gnomey! <3

  • Thank you, Bethany!

  • Thank you Carolyn! I am so glad you like my little gnome. I hope you have fun making one of your very own.

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Oct 3, 2016

Stitchology 25: 4-Stranded Basketweave

This is a truly lovely and eye catching design for you to create on your looms!  I love the accentuated woven look it provides.  My hubby is one who doesn’t usually pay particular attention to the subtleties of my various knitting stitches, but when I showed him this one, he was immediately pleased with the look and said, “Now that’s an interesting stitch!”  :)  Even though this stitch is a 16 row repeat, once you get the hang of how the rows flow, they can be worked entirely from memory.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure. My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square. As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you? You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

4-Stranded Basketweave Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge. The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage mellow) *Note: It really helps to use a yarn with a very high wool content for thoroughly blocking this square to help straighten those long strands.

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors. (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

It really helps to use a yarn with a very high wool content for thoroughly blocking this square to help straighten those long strands.

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 6—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows. The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

A SWYF in the pattern denotes that this peg will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg.  This stitch pattern will do this in groups of four stitches at a time.

*SWYF Notes:  Because this stitch requires slipping 4 pegs at a time, make sure to pull slipped strands taut when knitting the next stitch after the slipped stitches.  This will keep the strands from sagging after the square is complete and blocked.

Another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:
Rows 1 & all odd numbered rows: k6.
Rows 2, 4, 6, & 8: SWYF-2, k2, SWYF-2.
Rows 10, 12, 14, & 16: k1, SWYF-4, k1.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart. Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing! For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p38.
Row 2: k38.
Row 3: p38.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 4 (and all even rows): k38.
Rows 5, 7, 9, & 11: p3, k1, SWYF-2, k2, *SWYF-4, k2, repeat from * to last 6 sts, SWYF-2, k1, p3.
Rows 13, 15, 17, & 19: p3, k2, *SWYF-4, k2, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p3.
Rows 20-76: repeat Rows 4-19.

Finishing Rows

Row 77: p38.
Row 78: k38.
Row 79: p38.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off) Weave in ends and trim close to work.
Block well to an 8” x 8” measurement.  It helps to squish the square in hot water for a bit, then soak thoroughly.  This will help tighten those long strands.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares. We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket. Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as
necessary:

• Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
• Children: 42″ x 48″
• Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
• Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
• Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

8 Comments

  • Is there a video showing the SWYF
    I understand better that way
    I am new to looming
    Thanks

  • Hi Ginny :) Welcome to the wonderful world of Loom Knitting! I know you’ll get years of enjoyment from this craft.

    In answer to your question, if you go to this link for the Bunnies on Parade Stitch, Stitchology 21, you’ll find a tutorial video included.
    http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/5625

    In this video, the first technique shown is the one for a s2wyif, which is really the same as a SWYF-2. Just follow the first steps, without wrapping the working yarn back behind the pegs a second time to p2. This is for the bunny stitch only. ;) For the Stranded Basketweave, you would actually continue with 2 more SWYF so that you you have a total of 4 slipped stitches. Then on the following knit stitch, pull that trailing strand very taut, so that it won’t want to sag.

    This should get you going…it’s really super simple to do! :) Please feel free to let me know if I can be of any additional help.
    Bethany~

  • Hi,
    is there a way to make this pattern come out more like the needle version? I have noticed that patterns with slip stitches create very large floats when loomed, whereas the floats in the needle version look a lot shorter.

    Thanks!

  • I think the “long floats” created by swyf on a loom is supposed to look this way.

  • Well, these are pretty long floats to begin with…you are slipping 4 pegs to make them. To make them be snugger, you need to pull the line taut before knitting the next stitch after the float. This helps keep those long lines from sagging too much. Even after doing this, you will still notice a little sag until the square is blocked. This is why this particular stitch is highly recommended to be worked in a wool or high wool content blend, to aid in the blocking process. After this, they should lie flat. :)

    If you still don’t like the look of the long strands, you could work the same idea with only slipping 3 pegs. This will keep them shorter, with less chance of them being too loose. Of course, the pattern will have to reworked to account for the adjusted peg number in use.

  • Bethany, I have actually noticed the same thing as Sara. Your pattern “Triple Rib Square”(http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/4881) looks quite different than if it was knitted on needles(http://www.knitca.com/slipstitch14). I think it must just be due to the pegs stretching the stitches so much.

  • You are correct, Brynn. The simple nature of loom knitting has the stitches being worked at their most stretched out position. This makes the slipped stitches stretch across the already stretched out stitches. When you are doing the same thing on needles, the slipped stitches are simply carried around the yarn of the previous row’s stitches, which as you can imagine, produces a tighter float. There’s not much to be done to make them look any similar…this is just one of those things where the differences show when forming the stitches on pegs in a line, rather than on two sticks. ;)

  • Thank you Bethany for the explanation :)

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Sep 25, 2016

Picot-Boo Bonnet

zoeys-set
This sweet baby bonnet is the matching topper for the little pair of booties, Zoey’s Tootsies, released last year.  These were especially designed for my niece, with whom they share a namesake. The bit of picot edging and the contrast colored “peek-a-boo” back, along with the adorable ribbon tie, are what make this little bonnet an heirloom quality accessory!
Zoey’s Toesies: click here to access the coordinating booties pattern~

Items Needed:

Knitting loom: KB 18″ All-n-One Loom

Yarn:  approx. 1 skein each color of Cascade Yarns Fixation: Sock Weight, 100 yards, 98.3% Cotton/ 1.7% Elastic (sample in colors MC: #9907 & CC: Lemon).

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors, 26″ length of ribbon or I-cord.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, 4mm crochet hook for cast on and help with possible missed stitches, etc.)

Gauge: 11 stitches and 24 rows= 2″.

Finished bonnet measures 5.5″ in height and depth, and 11″ around face edge.

Skills Needed: True Knit Stitch or U-stitch, Chain CO and/or Half Hitch CO, and Gather BO, Knit 2 Together.

zoey-in-the-picot-boo-bonnet

Little Baby Zoey! :)

Pattern Notes:

All knit stitches are either worked as a true knit stitch, or as a U-stitch.

The sample bonnet was knit using an elastic yarn, which makes the end result nice and smooshy.  The thing to be careful of is keeping just a little bit of tension on the yarn throughout the project. This gives the project that perfect amount of stretch…not too little and not too much.  BUT!  make sure to keep the tension consistent throughout the project for a smooth, even knitted fabric.

Abbreviations: 

CO: cast on

HHCO: half hitch cast on

CC: Contrast Color

MC: Main Color

K: knit stitch or U-stitch, as desired

S1: slip one, or skip one

KO: knit off

St(s): stitches

WY: working yarn

k2tog: knit 2 stitches together.

BO: Bind off

 

Pattern Instructions:

Using your CC yarn, CO to 60 pegs to work as a flat panel. (Sample uses chain CO.)

Rows 1-9: S1, k59.

Row 10: K2tog every odd peg starting with peg 3 (Move loop from peg 2 to peg 3, move loop from peg 4 to peg 5, etc, all around loom. To work row, s1, carry WY behind each empty peg, k all pegs with 2 loops 2 over 1.).

Row 11:  S1, then carry yarn in front of each empty peg and k each peg with loops. All pegs will now be filled.

Rows 12-20: S1, k59.

Cut CC.  Pull CO sts back up onto all corresponding pegs. Knit extra loops 2 over 1 on next row.

Row 21:  Using MC, CO to 6 pegs before peg 1, k60, CO to 6 pegs after peg 60. There will now be 72 pegs with loops. (Sample uses chain CO, but HHCO could also be used.)

Rows 22-60: K72.  Cut MC.

Rows 61-66: Using CC k72.  Count down 6 sts (at the beginning of the CC rows) and pull sts back up onto all corresponding pegs and KO.

Rows 67-88: Continuing with CC, k72.

picot-boo-bonnet-back

Gather BO until there is a keyhole opening of 2.5″. Knot the two bottom edges together.

Pin a 26″ ribbon or knit I-cord for tying loosely around baby’s neck along the bottom edge. Fold under 1″ of bottom edge and stitch in place, making sure to not sew through ribbon/I-cord.

Weave in all ends, stretching the fabric as you go, so that the tails will stay hidden.  Trim close to work.

*To contact Bethany Dailey, simply submit a comment at the bottom of this post. :)

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Sep 19, 2016

Loom FAQs: I Need to Crochet??

Loom FAQs

 

Crochet??  What??  I thought this was a loom knitting blog…  Fear not.  It is still a loom knitting blog.  And yes.  This is still a loom knitting article.

While I know that most people that loom knit do not know how to crochet, it has been brought to my attention recently that most loom knitters, especially beginners, find crochet borders on loom knit items as “deceptive” since it is a loom knit pattern.  And while these borders can be left off, it will not look like the picture.  Hmmm…  Never really thought if it as deceptive to have a crochet border on a loom knit project, but I can see where she was going with it.

Most loom knit patterns do not have anything crochet at all.  But occasionally there are.  And not everyone was a fortunate enough to have a grandmother to teach them to crochet like I was.

Of course, this would be the reason I see all those questions about how to make convert a certain crochet project to loom knit.  Which of course you can’t…  Please refer to my previous article on converting for more about that.  But even something like a crochet border is just as complicated as a complete crochet project to some.

On that note, I would like to do my best to help instruct loom knitters on how to crochet a border on a flat panel.

What do you mean by “flat panel”?

When you loom knit a blanket, dish cloth, or anything else that is not worked in the round like a hat, it is a flat panel.

Why would I need to crochet a border?

Borders are needed to keep pieces from curling if the project is all knit.  Crocheting a border onto a finished flat panel will help keep it from curling.  Not all flat panels need to have a crochet border though.  Borders can be created by changing the stitch pattern while working the piece.  You can find out more on that here.

Sometimes the edges are just ugly or do not match.  While there are ways to work the project so that all the edges match, sometimes it is preferable to just crochet a border instead.   You can learn more on making the edges match while knitting here.

How do I crochet a border?

While there are lots of ways to crochet a border, today I will only demonstrate how to work a single crochet border onto a flat panel in the interest of keeping it simple.

I have worked a simple small square in all knit or stockinette in pink.  I will be using red for the border.  This square was worked on the Hat Loom in small gauge using worsted/medium weight yarn.  I am using a US 7/4.5mm hook for the border.

How do I know what size hook to use?

The easiest way to know what size hook to use if the pattern doesn’t specify is to use the hook recommended on the label of the yarn you are using.  If you are using more than one strand of yarn to create a bulkier yarn, you can refer here to know what weight yarn it is equivalent to.

Here is a rough guide to what size hook to use with each yarn weight that is commonly used in loom knitting.

Yarn Weight            Crochet Hook Size (US/metric)

3/light, dk, sport              7  t0  I-9  /  4.5 – 5.5mm

4/worsted, aran                I-9  to  K-10 1/2  /  5.5 – 6.5mm

5/bulky, chunky               K-10 1/2  to  M-13  /  6.5 – 9mm

6/super bulky                   M-13  to  Q  /  9 – 15mm

7/jumbo                             Q and larger  /  15mm and larger

Or you can just use whatever size will easily fit in the stitches without forcing the hook through.  That is usually what I do…

What if I am left handed?

Simply work everything I show in the other direction.  I do realize that most left handed people can use their right hand just as well as the left.  My sister is one of them.  While she writes with her left hand, she loom knits and crochets with her right as well as lots of other everyday activities with her right hand instead of her left.

Where and how do I join the yarn onto the piece?

You can join the yarn anywhere you like.  I prefer to join at the top right corner in the stitch next to the corner so that the last thing worked is the corner.

2-first-stitch

 

To do this, hold the project with the right side facing you.  I have worked a small flat panel with an e-wrap cast on and a basic bind off.  I am holding the bind off edge at the top.  You can use the cast on edge if you prefer.

I am pointing to the first stitch at the corner with my hook.

 

 

 

 

1-slip-knot-on-hook

 

First make a slip knot and place on the hook.

 

 

 

 

3-second-stitch

 

 

 

 

Insert the hook into the second stitch.

 

 

 

Join the yarn with a slip stitch by doing the following:

 

4-yo

 

 

Yarn over by hooking the working yarn with the crochet hook.

 

 

 

5-pull-loop-through

 

 

Pull working yarn through the stitch.

 

 

 

 

6-pull-loop-through-slip-knot

 

 

Then pull it again through the slip knot.

 

 

 

 

7-snug-up-tail

 

 

Pull on the tail to snug up the joining slip stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

Now the yarn is joined to the piece, and you are ready to start your border.

How do I work the single crochet stitch?

8-work-in-tail

 

Before starting, you can hide your tail from your panel by bringing it across the edge and working the crochet stitches over the tail.  This is optional.  Just one less tail to weave in if you do.

 

 

Now you are ready to chain 1.  You must do this in order for the single crochet stitch to stand  up.

9-yo-for-chain

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

 

10-chain-1

 

 

Pull through the loop on the hook.

Chain 1 complete!

 

 

 

 

Now for the first single crochet stitch.

11-insert-in-same-stitch

 

 

Insert hook in same stitch as the join.

 

 

 

 

12-yo

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

 

13-pull-loop-through

 

 

Pull through the stitch so that there are now 2 loops on the hook.

 

 

 

 

14-yo

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

15-pull-through-both-loops

 

 

Pull loop through both loops on the hook.

Single crochet stitch complete!

 

 

 

16-insert-hook-next-stitch

 

 

Now you are ready to insert the hook into the next stitch and repeat the instructions for the single crochet stitch until you get to the corner stitch.

 

 

 

Where do I insert the hook for each stitch?

On the cast on and bind off edges, each crochet stitch goes into each stitch as you go since the size of the crochet hook should match the gauge of the knitted piece.  Those 2 edges are the easy ones.

The sides are a different story though.  When you look at a swatch gauge, there are more rows in an inch than there are stitches.  When working a crochet border, you need to take care that you do not work too many stitches or not enough stitches.

How will I know how where to put the stitches on the sides?  To be honest, it’s a guessing a game for the most part.

 

What happens if I do not space my crochet stitches evenly?

While working across the cast on and bind off edges is stitch for stitch as mentioned before, the sides is where a person can mess up the border by not having the stitches spaced evenly.

If you work too many stitches, the edge will ruffle like this.

too-many-stitches

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you do not work enough stitches, the body of the project will gather with the edge being too tight like this.

not-enough-stitches

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you use too many or not enough stitches on the edges, blocking will not fix it.  You will need to take the stitches back out and try again.

 

What do I do at the corners?

Corners need extra stitches so that the border will lay flat.  Each corner stitch requires 3 stitches of single crochet in the same stitch on each round.

17-corner-stitch

 

When the corner is reached,

 

 

 

 

18-first-stitch-in-corner

 

work the first single crochet in the corner.

 

 

 

 

 

Then work 2 more in the same place.

 

22-three-stitches-in-corner

 

All 3 stitches in one stitch will look like this.

 

 

 

 

23-next-stitch-in-side

 

Then continue on with the next side.

 

 

 

 

 

Repeat the 3 stitches in one space at each corner.  The last corner should be your last stitch.  You will join the round after the last corner.  How you join will depend on if you are only doing 1 round or continuing with another round.

What if I want to work more than one round?

If working more than one round of single crochet for the border, you will need to join the first round with a slip stitch.

 

28-slip-stitch

 

 

When you reach the first stitch, place your hook through the top of that stitch.

 

 

 

 

29-yo-for-slip-stitch

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

 

30-pull-through-stitch-and-loop-on-hook

 

 

Then pull the working yarn through the stitch as well as the loop on the hook to complete the slip stitch.

 

 

 

31-chain-1

 

 

Then chain 1 and start the next round in the stitch where you joined.

 

 

 

 

 

Continue as before until you get to the corner.

Work a single crochet stitch in the first corner stitch in the row below.

Place the 3 single crochet stitches in the middle stitch of the 3 at the corner on the round below.

Then work a single crochet stitch in the last corner stitch of the row below.

 

34-three-stitches-in-middle-stitch-for-corner

 

 

Now you have worked your corner.  Continue as before.

 

 

 

 

How do I finish so the join is not seen?

After completing the last stitch, do not join with the slip stitch.

 

36-cut-working-yarn-remove-hook

 

Cut the working yarn with a tail long enough to weave in and thread it onto a tapestry needle.

 

 

 

37-thread-tapestry-needle

 

 

Thread tail on tapestry needle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

38-insert-tapestry-needle-in-loop

 

 

Thread needle through the loop in the direction you were working.  Since I was working right to left, I inserted the needle into the loop from the right side of the loop to the left.  Pull the yarn through.

 

 

 

 

39-insert-needle-through-next-stitch

 

 

Run the needle through the stitch you are joining from the back of the work to the front making sure you catch the entire stitch so it will look like the needle is under 2 strands of yarn.  Pull yarn through.

 

 

 

40-insert-back-through-loop

 

Run the needle back through the last loop in the opposite direction than you did the first time.  For me, I went from left to right making sure the needle came out the back of the work.

Pull the yarn through.

 

 

 

41-finished-join

 

Now you are ready to weave in that last end for a nice seamless join.

 

 

 

 

 

 

finished-border

 

Crochet border complete!

While you can see the other color between the stitches on the sides, this will not happen when using the same color for the border.

Blocking will also help even out those stitches as well.

 

 

 

 

While the majority of loom knitting patterns do not require any crochet knowledge at all, some do.  A person does not need to proficient in crochet in order to work a simple border in crochet.  But once you learn, you may be hooked!  I find a mixture of loom knitting and crochet a fun and satisfying project.  Brings together 2 of my favorite things.

Hope this helps!  Happy loom knitting as well as crocheting!

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Sep 19, 2016

Loom Weaving: The Soumak Weave

Soumak Weave on a Knitting Loom!Hi! I’m back again to share another pattern you can weave on your knitting loom. The soumak weave makes a really fun texture and pattern. This stitch makes what looks like a braid on your weaves. I’m excited to be sharing this how to along with a simple pattern that a beginner can make!

Loom: All-in-One Loom & 20-Peg-Extenders

Yarn: Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton Classic Size 10 in white is used for the warp, Red Heart Soft Yarn in White is used for the weft, and a hand-spun Coral Merino wool thick n’ thin from AmandaJFrench on Etsy is used for the soumak

Notions: tapestry needle, wooden dowel rod

Soumak Weave Steps:

Soumak Weave on a Knitting Loom!Step 1: Pass your weft thread over three warp threads on the right side of the loom

Step 2: At the third warp, bring your weft thread under and around the third warp so that you finish with your weft thread above the warp again.

Step 3: Bring your weft over the third, fourth, and fifth warps, then loop under and around the fifth warp.

Step 4: Repeat this pattern of passing over three warps and looping around the third until you have reached the end.

Soumak Weave on a Knitting Loom!Step 5: To then weave your soumak in the opposite direction, loop your weft thread over and around your warp and pull your weft thread to the right side.

Step 6: Following the soumak pattern from your bottom row, bring the weft across the same warp threads then loop around the same warp as you did in the row below. Repeat the soumak weave across the new row.


Soumak Weave on a Knitting Loom!Fluffy Soumak Wall Hanging Pattern Instructions:

Set up your loom as described here. Double knot your warp thread on pin #2 from the bottom left. Warp your loom so that 18 pins are warp across the top and 19 pins are warped on the bottom, which includes your beginning double knot and your ending double knot of the warp thread. Tie your anchor thread across the top of the warp loops.

Weave 3 rows of the plain weave using your white yarn.

Soumak Weave on a Knitting Loom!Combine 3 threads of your thick n’ thin yarn, we’ll weave them as one to add more texture and volume.

Soumak weave two rows, making sure to soumak weave every 4 warp threads (to account for the bulk of your yarn).

Repeat 4 times:

Plain weave 3 rows

Soumak weave 2 rows

End with 3 rows of plain weave.

Tuck your yarn tails in the back of the weave. For the plain weave rows, follow the instructions here.

Soumak Weave on a Knitting Loom!To tuck in the bulky thick n’ thin soumak rows, take your tapestry needle and tuck the threads through the back of two warp threads showing. There will be three warp threads showing in the back, I tucked my threads through the middle of one group and then the middle of a second group.

Following the similar finishing instructions here, cut your bottom warp threads and tie 4 threads into a single knot, making sure they are tight against the bottom plain weave row. Carefully remove the top warp loops from the loom pegs, then twist each one three times and put the dowel rod through the loops.

Once your weave is hung on the dowel rod and tied at the bottom, lay it on a flat surface and straighten the hanging warp threads. Using scissors cut each group of four warp threads at an even angle on both sides to form a slight point.

You now have a beautiful and fluffy weave to hang in your home or give as a gift!

Happy Weaving!

Kate from The Weaving Loom (a blog dedicated to helping others learn to weave)

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Sep 17, 2016

Simple Baby Layette Set

simple-baby-layetteOur next baby loom knit for September brings you a lovely Baby Layette. Traditionally, a baby was welcomed into a family with lovely knits from grandma’s, aunts and older sisters. This lovely layette is a beginner level with simple shaping and basic stitches. 

LOOM:  All-n-One Loom

YARN:  Approx 360 yds of worsted weight yarn.  Knit Picks, The Mighty Stitch (2 skeins) in Mint was used in sample.

Pants: Approx 150 yds
Sweater: Approx 155 yds
Hat: Approx 55 yds.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

OTHER:  Small accent button for sweater

GAUGE: 8sts x 14 rows = 2 inches.

SIZE:  Newborn 

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately, BBO=Basic Bind off, CO=Cast on, k=knit stitch, k2tog=knit two stitches together, p=purl stitch, rnd(s)=Round(s), st(s)=stitch(es), w&t=wrap and turn

 

HAT

CO 60 sts, prepare to work in the round.

Rnd 1, 3, 5, 7: K to end

Rnd 2, 4, 6, 8: P to end

Rnd 9-40: K to end

Cut a piece of yarn that is 16 inches long. Thread tapestry needle with yarn. Remove the loops from the even numbered pegs. Cut another piece of yarn, 16 inches long, thread through tapestry needle. Remove all the loops from the odd numbered pegs. Gently, cinch the stitches from the even numbered pegs. Tighten with a square knot. Gently, cinch the stitches from the odd numbered pegs. Tighten with a square knot.

Weave ends in.

BABY PANTS

CO 76 sts, prepare to work in the round.

Rnd 1-7: k to end of rnd

Rnd 8: p to end of rnd

Rnd 9-15: k to end of rnd

Rnd 16: p to end of rnd

Rnd 17: k to end of rnd

Rnd 18: p to end of rnd

Rnd 19: k to end of rnd

Rnd 20: p to end of rnd.

Rnd 21-27: k to end of rnd.

Work in short rows for back of pants as follows (similar to a heel):

Short row 1:  k37, w&t peg 38

Short row 2: k from peg 37 to peg 2, w&t peg 1

Short row 3: k from peg 2 to peg 36, w&t peg 37

Short row 4: k from peg 36 to peg 3, w&t peg 2

Short row 5: k from peg 3 to peg 35, w&t peg 36

Short row 6: k from peg 35 to peg 4, w&t peg 3

Short row 7: k from peg 4 to peg 34, w&t peg 35

Short row 8: k from peg 34 to peg 5, w&t peg 4

Short row 9: k from peg 5 to peg 33, w&t peg 34

Short row 10: k from peg 33 to peg 6, w&t peg 5

Short row 11: k from peg 6 to peg 32, w&t peg 33

Short row 12: k from peg 32 to peg 7, w&t peg 6

Short row 13: k from peg 7 to peg 31, w&t peg 32

Short row 14: k from peg 31 to peg 8, w&t peg 7

Short row 15: k from peg 8 to peg 30, w&t peg 31

Short row 16: k from peg 30 to peg 9, w&t peg 8

Short row 17: k from peg 9 to peg 29, w&t peg 30

Short row 18: k from peg 29 to peg 10, w&t peg 9

Short row 19: k from peg 10 to peg 28, w&t peg 29

Short row 20: k from peg 28 to peg 11, w&t peg 10

Short row 21: k from peg 11 to peg 27, w&t peg 28

Short row 22: k from peg 27 to peg 12, w&t peg 11

Short row 23: k from peg 12 to peg 26, w&t peg 27

Short row 24: k from peg 26 to peg 13, w&t peg 12

Next rnd:  starting with peg 13, k to end of rnd

Next 20 rnds: k to end of rnd

Next rnd: k17, bo4, k17, k17, bo4, k17

From this point forward, you will be working the legs as flat panels as follows: One leg over the first 34 sts, second leg over the second set of 34 sts.

Leg 1

Next 28 rows: k to end of row

Next row: p to end of row

Next row: k to end of row

Next row: p to end of row

Next row: k to end of row

Next row: p to end of row.

BBO.

Repeat with Leg 2.

BABY SWEATER

CO 68 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1, 3, 5, 7: k to end

Row 2, 4, 6, 8: p to end

Row 9: k to end

Row 10: p4, k to last 4 sts, p4.

Repeat Row 9 and Row 10: until row 30 is reached (ends on a Row 10).

Divide sweater into three parts, two front panels and back panel as follows: Right side panel: first 17 pegs, back panel: middle 34 pegs, left side panel: remaining 17 pegs.

Working yarn is at peg 1, attach another skein of yarn to peg 18 and peg 52.

*Next row: with yarn coming from peg 1: k17, pu yarn at peg 18: k34, pu yarn at peg 52: k17

Next row: with yarn coming from peg 1: p17, pu yarn at peg 18: p34 , pu yarn at peg 52: p17*

Rep from * to *: 10 more times (20 more rows).

Next row: with yarn coming from peg 1: k17, pu yarn at peg 18: k34, pu yarn at peg 52: k17

Next row: with yarn coming from peg 1: BO 5, p12, pu yarn at peg 18: p34, pu yarn at peg 52: p12, BO 5, cut yarn leaving a 5 inch tail, attach at peg 6*

Next row: k12, k34, k12 (picking up the skein from that specific section)

Next row: p12, k34, p12 (picking up the skein from that specific section)

BBO all three sections.

SLEEVES

(make 2)

CO 34 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1: k to end.

Row 2: p to end.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: 4 more times.

Next 4 rows: k to end.

*Next row: k2, k2tog, k to last 4 sts, k2tog, k2.

Next 3 rows: k to end*.

Rep from * to * until 28 sts rem.

Next 8 rows: k to end.

Next row: p to end.

Next row: k to end.

Rep last two rows: 2 more times.

BBO. 

ASSEMBLY

Block all pieces. Mattress stitch seam the shoulders first: approx 1.5 inches, leaving the rest open for the neck opening.  Mattress stitch

Mattress stitch seam the shoulders first: approx 1.5 inches, leaving the rest open for the neck opening.  Mattress stitch seam the sleeves to armholes. Mattress stitch seam the sleeve.

Secure a small button on the right side corner of the front panel.

Button loop: Using a crochet hook and yarn, crochet a chain (approx 6 chains) to the top corner of the right side front panel.

Weave ends in.

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Sep 12, 2016

Whimsical Loom Knits – Whiffy

 

Whimsical Loom Knits – September 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

This itty bitty baby skunk was designed for my husband.  He had a favorite little skunk toy when he was little.  He’s not actively collecting skunks, but over the years we’ve given him a little skunk figurine or other related item just for fun.  Whiffy is the newest member in his very small collection of these little critters.  I hope you’ll enjoy knitting this mini skunk for your favorite skunk enthusiast

img_3640

Knitting Loom: KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Small amounts of Red Heart Super Saver, in black, and Bernat Pipsqueak, in white.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, small amount of fiberfill, 2 beads (for eyes), small amount of thread in color of choice (for nose).

Gauge: Not critical for this project.

Finished Measurements: Approximately 1” by 2.5”

 

Instructions

Legs (make 4):

Using the black yarn, cast on 3 pegs.  Work a 3 peg i-cord for 2 rows.  Bind off.  Set cords aside for now.

 

Body:

Prepare the loom to work over 10 pegs, in the round.  With the black yarn, cast on 10 stitches using the drawstring cast on method.

img_3644    img_3645

Work 2 rounds using the u-wrap knit stitch.

Next 10 rounds:  Knit pegs 1-7 with the black yarn, knit the 8th peg with the white yarn, and knit the last 2 stitches with the white yarn.  Cut the black yarn, leaving a 20” yarn tail.  Using the black yarn, bind off with the gathered bind off method, skipping pegs 7, 8, and 9.  Pull the yarn tail to cinch the bottom of the skunk closed.  Continue on to the tail section.

 

Tail:

Work the tail using the 3 stitches remaining on the loom.

Row 1:  Knit peg 7 with the black yarn, peg 8 with the white yarn, and peg 9 with the black yarn.

Row 2:  Knit peg 9 with the black yarn, peg 8 with the white yarn, and peg 7 with the black yarn.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 twice more. Cut the white yarn.  Using the black yarn, bind off using the basic bind off method. Use the yarn needle to weave in the yarn ends at the end of the tail.

 

Finishing

Lightly stuff body.

Locate yarn tail from the drawstring cast on and pull until the opening is cinched closed.  Use the remaining yarn end to stitch an ear on each side of the skunk’s head.  Weave in any remaining length.

Using the yarn tails from the cast on, sew the legs to the bottom of the body.  Weave in all yarn ends.

Sew a bead on each side of the skunk, near the front.  Using thread, stitch a little nose on the front of the skunk, just below the eyes.  Weave in any remaining threads.

 

img_3642

 

 

4 Comments

  • Simply ADORABLE!!!!

  • Cute!

  • Thank you Alyna!

  • Thank you :)

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Sep 11, 2016

Baby Cardigan

Baby Cardigan

Welcoming a baby into this world with lovely hand knits is one of the ways to show the depth of your loved for the new addition to the world. This month of September, we at KB are going to bring you baby knits that you can knit for the precious new bundle.

LOOM:  All-n-One Loom, 81 pegs.

YARN: Approx 210 yards of pure  Merino Superwash worsted weight yarn.  Malabrigo Rios in Teal Feather was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, cable needle.

GAUGE: 11 sts x 22 rows= 2 inches in garter stitch

SIZE:  0-3 months.

ABBREVIATIONS


Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BBO=Basic bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

k2tog=knit two stitches together

CDD=Centered double decrease. Decreasing from 3 stitches down to 1. It is over 3 pegs, pegs are numbered as follows: PEG 3, PEG 2, PEG 1 (Peg 1 is on the right and peg 3 on the left). Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2. Take working yarn behind peg 1 and peg 2, knit peg 3. Move stitch from peg 3 over to peg 2. Lift bottommost two stitches (loops) up and off the peg. See video.

A video posted by Chubbette (@purlingsprite) on


YO=Yarn over (ewrap the empty peg, on next row, undo ewrap and place this strand of yarn in front of the peg and treat it as a stitch)

Rep=Repeat

Rem=remain

w&t=Wrap and turn

 baby-cardi-back-2

INSTRUCTIONS

Set knitting loom to work a flat panel over 81 pegs.

Row 1 should be from right to left.

Row 1, 3, 5, 7: k to end of row.

Row 2, 4, 6: p to end of row.

Row 8: p5, k to last 5 sts, p5.

Row 9: k5, *k1, yo, k3, CDD, k3, yo; rep from * to last 6 sts, k1, k5.

Rep Row 8 and Row 9: 12 more times.

Next row: Rep Row 8.

Next row: k9, CDD, *k7, CDD; rep from * to last 9 sts, k9. (67 sts rem on loom). 

From this point forward, you will work 3 separate panels, two front panels and the back panel: divided as follows: 17 sts, 33 sts, and 17 sts.

Right side panel

With yarn coming from the first peg, work on the first 17 pegs as follows:

Next row: p to end.

Next row: k to end.

Repeat last two rows: 12 more times (total of 24 rows, creating 12 garter stitch ridges).

Next row: k12, w&t.

Next row: p12.

Next row: k9, w&t.

Next row: p9.

BBO.

Back Panel

Place yarn on peg 18, work on next panel from peg 18 to peg 50.

Next row: p33.

Next row: k33. 

Rep last two rows: 14 more times (total of 28 rows, creating 14 garter stitch ridges).

BBO.

Left side panel

Place yarn on peg 81, work this last panel on remaining 17 stitches.

Next row: p to end.

Next row: k to end. 

Rep last two rows: 12 more times (total of 24 rows, creating 12 garter stitch ridges).

Next row: k12, w&t.

Next row: p12.

Next row: k9, w&t.

Next row: p9.

BBO.

sweater-panels

 Sleeves

(make 2)

CO 34 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1: k to end.

Row 2: p to end.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: 4 more times.

Next 4 rows: k to end.

*Next row: k2, k2tog, k to last 4 sts, k2tog, k2.

Next 3 rows: k to end*.

Rep from * to * until 28 sts rem.

Next 8 rows: k  to end.

Next row: p to end.

Next row: k to end.

Rep last two rows: 2 more times.

BBO. 

Wet block all pieces before assembly. To accentuate the peaks of the lace, pin down the peaks when blocking.

ASSEMBLY

button-closureMattress stitch seam the shoulders first: approx 1.5 inches, leaving the rest open for the neck opening.

Mattress stitch the sleeves to armholes. Mattress stitch down the sleeve.

Secure a small button on the right side corner of the front panel.

Button loop: Using a crochet hook and yarn, crochet a chain (approx 6 chains) to the top corner of the right side front panel.

Weave ends in.

 

 

2 Comments

  • Do you have a breakdown of the CDD?

  • Centered double decrease. Decreasing from 3 stitches down to 1. It is over 3 pegs, pegs are numbered as follows: PEG 3, PEG 2, PEG 1 (Peg 1 is on the right and peg 3 on the left). Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2. Take working yarn behind peg 1 and peg 2, knit peg 3. Move stitch from peg 3 over to peg 2. Lift bottommost two stitches (loops) up and off the peg.

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Sep 5, 2016

Stitchology 24: Barber Pole

Barber Pole Front Angle

The stitch we’ll be working up this month is wonderful for its simple symmetry and lines.  The bold repeating pattern makes this a shoe-in stitch for those guys in your life! I can visualize this being used for hats, sweaters, scarves, socks, you name it!

Back side of Barber Pole Stitch~

Back side of Barber Pole Stitch~

The back of this stitch looks completely different, but very pleasingmaking this ideal for possible reversible projects or ones that might be viewed from both sides.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Barber Pole Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight Wool (Sample uses Patons Classic Wool Worsted in Jade Heather)  *Wool is recommended for this square, as blocking is a must.

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 8 sts—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
rep: repeat
CO: cast on
k:  knit
p: purl
wy: working yarn
BO: bind off

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 1:  p1, k6, p1.

Row 2:  p1, k5, p2.

Row 3: p3, k4, p1.

Row 4: p1, k3, p2, k1, p1..

Row 5: p1, k2, p2, k2, p1.

Row 6: p1, k1, p2, k3, p1..

Row 7: p1, k4, p3.

Row 8: p2, k5, p1.

Row 9 & 10: p1, k6, p1.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

 

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  p38.

Row 2:  k38.

Row 3:  p38.

Row 4:  k38.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: p4, *k6, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 6: k3, p1, *k5, p3,  rep from * to last 5 sts, p2, k3.

Row 7: p6, *k4, p4, rep from * to end of row.

Row 8: k3, p1, *k3, p2, k1, p2,  rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Row 9: p4, *k2, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 10: k3, p1, *k1, p2, k3, p2,  rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Row 11: p4, *k4, p4, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 12: k3, p2, *k5, p3, rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Row 13: p4, *k6, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 14: k3, p1, *k6, p2,  rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Rows 15-54:  rep Rows 5-14.

Rows 55-57: rep Rows 5-7.

Finishing Rows

Row 58:  k38.

Row 59:  p38.

Row 60:  k38.

Row 61: p38.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

4 Comments

  • Thank you I was waiting for the next pattern

  • Oh, glad to help keep your loomy juices flowing, Ginny! :) Some of us took a little vacay time in August, but are back now, so you’ll see more designs coming off the looms soon! :D

  • Love this easy pattern. Would the wrong side look nice enough for a mans scarf? Keep the patterns coming. Than you!

  • Hi Cindy! :) I’m so glad you like it! I think the back side is really neat looking and would be very suitable for a men’s scarf. Of course, everyone has their own preferences, but I, myself, would definitely use it for that purpose! ;)

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Aug 15, 2016

Zippy Master Set Makes an Appearance

We would like to share some amazing Zippy projects done by various designers! Please go support them and leave feedback on their blogs on these cute, free patterns for the new Zippy Master set.

zippy master desings1

No Twist Drop Stitch Chunky Scarf by Bethany Dailey

Shades of Grey Pillow by Renita Harvey

Cozy Zippy Lapghan by Isela Phelps

Champ-Elysees Scarf by Jenny Stark 

2 Comments

  • I bought most of the Zippy loom parts before the master set came out. Is it possible to purchase the L-connectors and straight connectors. I have everything else so I don’t really want to purchase the Master set. Thanks so much for any suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Pam Smart

  • It is in the plans that these parts will be sold separately in the near future in our website.

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Aug 13, 2016

Simple Striped Woven Wall Hanging

Simple Striped Woven Wall HangingWeaving has made a huge comeback and there is no doubt that the reason is it’s so fun! With this pattern for beginner’s you’ll be able to make your very own woven wall hanging.

Loom: All-in-One Loom & 20-Peg-Extenders

Yarn: Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton Classic Size 10 in Golden Yellow is used for the warp, Red Heart Soft Yarn in White is used for the weft, Red Heart Soft Yarn in Seafoam is used for the weft, and Red Heart Soft Yarn in Charcoal is used for the double thread weft.

Notions: tapestry needle, wooden dowel rod

Instructions:

Assemble your knitting loom using the 48 peg sides with the 20 peg extenders

Starting at the third peg on the extender bar, warp your loom following the instructions here so that 16 pegs are warped across the top and 17 pegs on the bottom. Add your anchor thread.

Plain weave the following, leaving 3 inch yarn tails on the sides of your weave when you complete a color block:

13 rows of white

5 rows of 2 strands of charcoal

7 rows of white

2 rows of seafoam

4 rows of white

2 rows of seafoam

8 rows of 2 strands of charcoal

2 rows of seafoam

5 rows of white

2 rows of seafoam

7 rows of white

8 rows of seafoam

9 rows of 2 strands of charcoal

The main body of the weave is complete. Finish your weave following the instructions here.

Congratulations on weaving a wall hanging! Please let me know if you have any questions or comments below.

Happy Weaving!

Kate from The Weaving Loom

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Aug 7, 2016

Learn to Weave a Tapestry: Part 2

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 2

Weaving has made a huge comeback and there is no doubt that the reason is it’s so fun! We’re going to show you how to use your Knitting Loom as a weaving loom! In this part 2 instruction you’ll learn how to finish your weave, take it off the loom, and hang it for display.  We covered part 1 here.

Weaving Terms:

Warp: The thread that is vertically wrapped around your loom, this is the backbone of the weave.

Weft: The thread that is horizontally woven between the warp threads, this is the design of the weave.

Loom: All-n-One Loom & 20-Peg-Extenders

Yarn: Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton Classic Size 10 in Golden Yellow is used for the warp, Red Heart Soft Yarn in White is used for the weft, Red Heart Soft Yarn in Seafoam is used for the weft, and Red Heart Soft Yarn in Charcoal is used for the double thread weft.

Notions: tapestry needle, wooden dowel rod

Finishing Your Weave Instructions:

To finish your weave, you will first have to secure all your yarn tails. Turn your Knitting Loom over so that the back of the weave is facing you.

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 2

To secure your yarn tails:

  • If your yarn tail ends under the warp thread, take the tapestry needle and pull it through the back of the same colored weft rows below it.
  • If your yarn tail ends over the warp thread, take the tapestry needle and loop around the warp thread, bringing the yarn tail up so that it is now under the warp thread and then pull it through the back of the same colored weft rows below it.

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 2

To secure thick yarn or doubled thread:

  • If your yarn tail ends under the warp thread, take the tapestry needle and hook the yarn tail under the closest warp thread.
  • If your yarn tail ends over the warp thread, take the tapestry needle and loop around the warp thread, bringing the yarn tail up so that it is now under the warp thread and then hook the yarn tail under the closest warp thread.

Secure one yarn tail at a time to the back of your weave and trim any excess yarn once secured. As you secure each yarn tail, flip back to the front and make sure that your yarn tails are not showing in the front of the weave.

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 2

Once all yarn tails are secured and trimmed, cut the anchor thread.

Next cut across the bottom warp threads, I cut mine to 5 inches long.

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 2

Now knot two warp threads together at a time all the way across the bottom of the weave to secure it.

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 2

Carefully lift the top warp loops off the loom.

Pass the dowel rod through the warp loops. If your dowel rod is thinner then the loops then double twist the loops above the top weft row and then pass the dowel rod through the loop. This will secure your top weft row from creeping up your warp loops.

Now you know how to begin a weave, make the plain weave, and how to finish your weave. Don’t forget to try our beginner’s pattern where you can practice what you’ve learned!

Please let me know if you have any questions or comments below!

Happy Weaving!

Kate from The Weaving Loom

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7 Comments

  • Has Stitchology ended

  • I am going to try to make a table runner using this weaving technique. I have the loom but never used it. Thanks for the tutorial .

  • Stitchology and all the other regular columns are on hold for the month of August. The columnist are taking a well deserved vacation.

  • Thanks I was hoping it did not end

  • Is this going to be on YouTube with the All-n-One Loom. I like to make a scraf with these instructions.

  • Anyone able to help me with the Harvest Lace shawl? I don’t understand why the description says there will be a gap between section1 and 2 – HELP!

  • Great job, I appreciate you hand made wall hanging tapestry. thanks for sharing.

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Aug 4, 2016

Learn to Weave a Tapestry: Part 1

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 1
Weaving has made a huge comeback and there is no doubt that the reason is it’s so fun! We’re going to show you how to use your Knitting Loom as a weaving loom! In this part 1 instruction you’ll learn how to warp your Knitting Loom and how to weave the plain (tabby) weave. We shared how to finish a weave here.

Weaving Terms:

Warp: The thread that is vertically wrapped around your loom, this is the backbone of the weave.

Weft: The thread that is horizontally woven between the warp threads, this is the design of the weave.

Loom: All-in-One Loom & 20-Peg-Extenders: Note the 28″ Knitting loom comes with the Peg Extenders. If you purchase the AIO, it doesn’t come with the Peg Extenders. In addition, the gauge of the Peg Extenders differs from the AIO. While you can use the Peg Extenders with the AIO to weave, it is not recommended to use them together to knit as the areas where the peg extenders will have a different gauge, proving you with a knit fabric that is not uniform throughout.

Yarn: Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton Classic Size 10 in Golden Yellow is used for the warp, Red Heart Soft Yarn in White is used for the weft, and Red Heart Soft Yarn in Charcoal is used for the double thread weft.

Notions: tapestry needle

Warping the Loom Instructions:

Assemble your knitting loom using the 48 peg sides with the 20 peg extenders

On the peg extender, count to the third peg and tie your warp thread in a double knot.
Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 1

Bring the warp thread up and around the corresponding top peg, then back down.

It is important to keep an even tension as you pull the warp thread around the pegs. You want your warp thread to be pulled tight enough to not sag, but it should have some bounce to it. It should be similar to a strung guitar.

Continue to pass the warp thread from bottom, around a peg, to top, around a peg, back to bottom and so on. Do this until you have pass the warp around the top peg that is the third from the end of the extender. You will have used 16 pegs at the top.

Then bring the warp thread down to the bottom peg that is second from the end of the extender where you will tie it off. Before you tie off the warp thread, check your tension, if the warp is sagging you can pull the warp around each peg to get it tighter as you work the excess towards your last peg. Once the tension is good, tie a double knot on that last peg and cut the thread from the ball. You will notice that both the start and end of the warp thread are tied at the bottom of the loom, this ensures you have warp loops at the top of your weave. You will have used 17 pegs at the bottom.
Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 1

Next, taking about 18 inches of your white yarn, tie and anchor string across the top warp threads (the top is the end without the warp thread knots). Between the second and third peg on the sides, tie a double knot of the yarn around the one side of the loom. Pull the yarn across the front of the warp threads and tie a double knot of the yarn around the opposite side of the loom. This anchor provides two functions; it keeps the warp threads from sliding up the pegs and it is a place marker of where to start your weaving.

Plain (Tabby) Weave Instructions:

The plain weave is the basic over 1 warp under 1 warp weaving pattern.

Turn your loom so that the top with the warp loops and anchor string is closest to you (or upside down). We will weave top to bottom.

Cut a length of the white yarn to approximately 36 inches long.
Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 1

Using this length of yarn and a tapestry needle, start plain weaving by passing the needle over 1 warp thread, then under 1 warp thread, over 1 and so on. Repeat this all the way across your warp threads and pull your yarn through leaving a 3 inch yarn tail off the side of the loom.

Push your woven yarn down with the tapestry needle, so that it is next to your anchor thread.

For the return pass, weave your yarn in the opposite pattern from the row before it. I ended under the warp thread, so in the return pass, I will start weaving over 1 warp, under 1 warp repeating until I reach the end of the row.

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 1Pull your weft thread until you have a slight loop around the end warp. If you pull too much, your warp threads will be pulled into the middle and your sides will not be straight.

Using your needle, push the weft thread down to the other row. A good exercise is to create weft hills, as is shown in the picture, so that you ensure your weft thread isn’t pulling on the warp strings. Push all the hills down until the wefts are flat against each other. If the weft is too loose you can tug a bit on the yarn remove excess yarn from the row, but make sure your warp end stays straight.

Weave back in the opposite direction again, continuing the over 1 warp, under 1 warp pattern. Each row will alternate this pattern.

Once you are finished leave a tail of 3 inches off the side.

Tapestry Weave on a Knitting Loom! Part 1

You can also weave the plain weave using more then one thread at a time. In the above picture you can see that two threads next to each other can be woven to add bulk. To do this, simply cut two threads of yarn and using the tapestry needle, weave both threads at the same time.

That wraps up Part 1, you can find Learn to Weave a Tapestry: Part 2 here and create a wall hanging with this beginner’s pattern!

Please let me know if you have any questions or comments below!

Happy Weaving!

Kate from The Weaving Loom

5 Comments

  • It would be nice to have a video on this?….

  • Yes, I agree that a video would be helpful. I want to weave on my 28″ board with the long connectors. I am assuming that the process would be the same. But visual instructions work best for me.

  • Is it possible to use dish cloth cotton instead of crochet cotton?

  • You can use any type of thread or fiber, including wool roving, rag strips, etc once you get the initial process down. Have fun with it!

  • Yes you can use dish cloth cotton. You can use anything for the warp, but I’ve found that using a strong thread with little stretch is the best to use when starting out. A dish cloth cotton would be both strong and have little stretch.

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Aug 1, 2016

NEW Zippy Master Set

Now you can get all your Zippy parts in one set !!

890531001726.main

 

With the Zippy Master Set, we are introducing new Zippy  “L” connectors and straight connectors to give you even more connection options than ever before!

Knitting on Zippy Loom is the easiest and fastest way to knit! With one Zippy create a scarf in 10-15 minutes. Great tool for beginners to learn loom knitting , and experienced knitters who want to create beautiful chunky knits quickly.

The Zippy Master Set includes: (4) Zippys, (4) Corners, (4) “L” connectors, (2) Straight connectors, (4) regular connectors, (4) projects, step by step instructions and knit hook.

Connect with Zippy Corners to make a 20 peg loom for adult hats, or cowls. With the brand new “L” connectors, make a 16 peg loom for kid’s hats, or use the straight connectors for double knitting. Mix Zippys + super bulky yarn to create super fast knits! Check out Zippy Loom patterns and Zippy Loom videos!

890531001726.PT02

To set up Zippy Looms to make a child size hat use the “L” connectors (above see connected), to make a 16 peg loom.  To set up Zippy Looms for double knitting, use (2) 8 peg Zippys and add the straight connectors to create a double knitting loom (see below).

Simple double knit scarf, knit using the straight connectors

Simple double knit scarf, knit using the straight connectors

doubleknit_sample2

Double Knit on Zippy for extra chunky scarf!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watch above to see Zippy Connections in Action!

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2 Comments

  • I have 10 zippys and4 connectors How can I get the straight connector?

  • Hi, its our very newest product and the new connectors are only available in the master kit at this time. Please be sure you are signed up for newsletters so you will be first to know when these parts may be available as stand alone products. Thank you, Pat

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Jul 31, 2016

Undulating Crescents Cowl

Crescents Cowl

It is not too early to begin knitting your knits for fall. The Crescents Cowl uses a beautiful lace stitch to create a cascading waterfall of eyelet openings that undulate around the cowl. Worked in luxurious pure merino wool, this item will become one of your go-to for this upcoming fall/winter.

LOOM:  All-n-One Loom (100 pegs used).

YARN:  Approx 200 yds of worsted weight pure merino superwash. Candombe was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.

GAUGE: 11sts x 16 rows = 2 inches.

SIZE:  10” wide x 11” high. To make wider—increase by 10 sts (wider cowls must use a different loom than the All-n-One. 


ABBREVIATIONSCrescents Cowl, loom and yarn

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

rnd(s)=Round(s)

SSK=Slip, slip, knit

YO=Yarn over (ewrap the empty peg)

INSTRUCTIONS

Set knitting loom to the 100 pegs.

CO 100 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1-Rnd 8: *k2, p2; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rnd 9: *p1, yo, k3, ssk, k4; rep from * to end.

Rnd 10 and all even numbered rnds: *p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Rnd 11: *p1, k1, yo, k3, ssk, k3; rep from * to end.

Rnd 13: *p1, k2, yo, k3, ssk, k2; rep from * to end.

Rnd 15: *p1, k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1; rep from * to end.

Rnd 17: *p1, k4, yo, k3, ssk; rep from * to end.

Rnds 18-20: *p1, k9; rep from * to end.

Rep Rnds 9-20: until item measures approx 10″ from cast on edge.

Next 8 rnds: *k2, p2; rep from  * to end of rnd.

Bind off with basic removal method. Weave ends in. Block lightly.

Continue reading »

4 Comments

  • Is there a repeat from Rnd 9 or so? Is so, how many repeats are there? Thank you!

  • Also, is there a Rnd 19 or is it the same as Rnd 18?

  • There is a Rnd 19. “Rnds 18-20: *p1, k9; rep from * to end.” This means that it is Rnds 18, 19, and 20, so yes, it is the same as Rnd 18.

  • Tricia, you repeat round 9-20 until the item measures approximately 10 inches from the cast on edge. If you want it longer (you will need more than the 1 skein of yarn), you can continue to make it longer, then finish off with the last 8 rounds in the pattern.

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