Browsing articles from "September, 2017"
Sep 23, 2017

Ribbing Stitch for Double Knit Loom

Knitting double knit in the round on the Double Knit Loom requires the regular double knit stitches to be reinvented to work with the circular shape. There has been some confusion concerning the wrap starting on the beginning peg, or not. Originally the Rib Stitch on the DKL was worked NOT starting on first peg, after the cast on. But this made row counting difficult, and didn’t make sense for many knitters.

We have revised the RIBBING STITCH in the round to work by coming back around to the beginning peg. This STITCH NOW STARTS ON BEGINNING PEG FOR EACH AND EVERY ROUND.  We are using the peg marked with the arrow on outer loom as the beginning peg.

Steps…

1. Wrap from beginning peg (peg 1) to peg 3 on inner loom.

2 Continue wrapping ‘every other peg’ until you wrap the peg across from the starting peg (starting peg marked with stitch marker). Skip the 2 pegs (marked with red arrows), wrap peg adjacent to the starting peg, then go to inner loom and wrap the consecutive peg. This will change your angle.

 

 

3. Then continue wrapping ‘every other’ peg.  You will be working in same direction, but at opposite angle.

4. When you end the round, the wrapping should look like photo below.

5. At this point, lay an anchor yarn around the stitches, between the looms, with yarn tails dangling below the looms.

6. Then repeat the process again starting with wrap around the starting peg on outer loom.  Once you have two rounds complete, hook over all pegs starting with outer loom.  Continue working as many rib rounds as desired or as pattern dictates, always starting on beginning peg.

2 Comments

  • I bought your sock loom the one that you can adjust by skidding the one piece it is plastic. I was watching a video on knitting a sock and the tool that was suppose to come with this loom is not the one I got with my loom. The other one looks like it is a lot Easter to use. Where can I buy one like that. It had an extra little hook on the end. Thank You.

  • Please contact us at info@knittingboard.com and send us a picture of the knitting tool you receive and we can confirm whether you received the correct knitting tool. We only have two knitting tools–one with a wooden handle and one with an orange handle; both have only one little hook.

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Sep 21, 2017

Loom FAQs: What Is A Provisional Cast On?

 

 

 

 

 

There are always so many questions in the loom knitting world on social media.  Why is my bind off so tight?  How I can match my bind off to my cast on?  What is waste yarn?  How do I cast on and still have live stitches for grafting?  

One of the more common problems in the world of loom knitting the getting the cast on and bind off to match.  Most people cannot get the tension on both ends to match due to the differences in the cast on and bind off methods.  But never fear.  There is a solution to that.

And while that one question at the first seems a bit off topic, all of the questions above do have the same answer.

That answer is using waste yarn to cast on.

What is waste yarn?

Waste yarn is just yarn of another color that is used to cast on and then used to knit the first few rows.

Why would I use waste yarn to cast on?

When waste yarn is used to cast on, the yarn that will then be used in the project can be added so that the waste yarn can be removed later.

Why would I want to remove the waste yarn?

While there are a lot of reasons to use waste yarn to cast on, there is only one main reason to remove the waste yarn after casting on.

That reason is to leave live stitches on the cast on end of the project.

What are “live stitches”?

Live stitches are the loops that are to be worked in knitting.  Generally speaking those are the stitches that are always on the pegs of the loom waiting to worked.  When binding off, those live stitches are being “closed” or ended so they will not run or unravel when the work is removed from the loom.

Why would I want live stitches on the cast on end?

There are a couple of very good reasons for wanting to have live stitches on the cast on end of a piece of work.

And both reason have to do with finishing the piece.

The first reason is so the work can then be placed back on the loom so that you can use the same bind off you used on the other end.  This is the best way to get both ends to match since they are worked in the exact same manner.

The second reason is so the cast on and bind off edges can be grafted together using the kitchener stitch to get a seamless join when making infinity scarves or other garments where you want to join but do not want a visible seam.

How do I work the provisional cast on so I get live stitches on the cast on edge to do with as my heart desires?

I am so very glad you asked!  Let’s get started!

Provisional Cast On

There are 2 things you will need when working a provisional cast on.  Well 1 thing definitely.  The other is just very highly recommended by yours truly in order to make your life easier and meaningful…

You will need waste yarn and a life line.  While both of those are just yarn, I would like to make certain recommendations first.

Waste Yarn 

When using waste yarn, you will want to use yarn that you will not be using again.  It does not need to be the same type of yarn you are using in the project.  If you are using high end yarn, please do not use the same for the waste yarn.  Why?  Well it IS called WASTE yarn for a reason.  You may be cutting it and most likely will not be able to reuse it so it becomes trash or waste.

I suggest using an inexpensive yarn that is a contrasting color.  You will want to be able to tell the difference between the waste yarn and the project yarn.

Lifeline

Life lines are just yarn in a different color as well.  But unlike waste yarn, you can reuse yarn that is used for lifelines.  Another suggestion is that the lifeline be a different color than the waste yarn AND the project.  This is so there is no confusion between the 3 different things.  I am one that tries my hardest to keep from being confused.  And my yarn is the one thing I have complete control over in my life.

If you are new to using lifelines in your work,  you can find more information in Loom FAQs  What Is a Lifeline?  The method that we will be doing here is adding the lifeline after the work is off the loom but the stitches that will be picked up are not the ones shown in the article.  More on that later.

Now let’s get started.

I have a loom, my project yarn which is the purple, my waste yarn which is the beige, and my lifeline which is orange.

First we will cast on with the waste yarn.  Doesn’t matter what cast on you use.  I suggest using the simplest and quickest which is the wrap cast on.

Now we will work about 6 rows of knit.  Doesn’t matter which knit stitch you use on this part.  It doesn’t need to match the rest of the work since we will be taking it off

Now we cut our waste yarn leaving a short tail.  It is finished for this project.

Add your project yarn in whatever manner you like when joining your yarn.

Here I have placed the slip knot on a neighboring peg so I can start knitting on peg 1.

The russian join is not a good one here since you still need that end.  You will want to leave a tail long enough to work whatever bind off or seaming technique you are planning on using when finishing the cast on edge later.

If you will be seaming with the kitchener stitch, leave a yarn tail about 1 and a half lengths of the pegs that are cast on.

If you plan on working the basic bind off, then you will want to leave a yarn tail at least 3 lengths of the pegs that are cast on.

You can simply put a slip knot on the first peg and then start working your pattern from here at row 1.

Or if you are like me and do not like knots in your work, just simply start row.  You do not need a knot or an anchor peg.  Just start knitting.  More on how to do that can be found in Loom FAQs:  Why Not Knots?

Continue until you are finished with your bind off on the other end.

Here you can see the work after it is off the loom

If you are wanting to graft the 2 ends together, simply place a second lifeline through the stitches on the loom and remove it.  Unless you will be adding the cast on edge to the bind off edge and binding them off together.  Then just leave it on the loom…

 

Now we will place the lifeline.  The lifeline will be placed in a different manner since we will be unraveling from the cast on end.  The loops are that need the lifeline are not the loops that are on the pegs which is why we didn’t place the lifeline as we went.  If the lifeline is placed through the stitches on the pegs, the lifeline will not go through the live stitches once the waste yarn is removed.  Sounds crazy, I know.  But just trust me on this.  When unraveling from the cast on end, the live stitches are between the pegs, not on them.

 

Turn the work over to see the back.

The first row where the project yarn can be seen are the stitches that will be picked up by the lifeline.

They are the ones at the bottom still in the beige stitches.

 

 

 

Thread the lifeline onto the tapestry needle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and run the needle through each of the loops until all are on the lifeline.

 

 

 

 

 

Since the lifeline has been placed, there is no need to fear dropped stitches.

Simply cut the work here on the waste yarn and then unravel the rest of the waste yarn until all that is left is the project with all the live stitches securely on the lifeline.

 

Or you can just pull the end tail of the waste yarn out across the piece so the waste yarn may be used again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now you are free to do whatever you please with those live stitches.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are wanting to bind off that end like the other end, simply put those stitches back on the loom and then bind off in the method of choice.

If you are wanting to bind off the cast on and bind off ends together, just place the stitches back on the loom over the stitches that are already on there by bring the work up through the middle of the loom making sure you do not catch the loom in the middle of the scarf.  Yes.  It has been done.  Yes.  I have seen it.

If you are wanting to graft the 2 ends together, proceed with whatever manner you choose whether it be the kitchener stitch on needles or putting the cast on end over the bind off end on the loom so that the kitchener stitch can be worked on the loom.  Both methods of working the Kitchener stitch can be found in Loom FAQs:  What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?

 

Well there you have it!  Waste yarn, the provisional cast on, and reasons why you would want live stitches on the cast on end.

Hope all your loom knitting projects have a happy ending!

2 Comments

  • This is sooooo helpful. Thank you for posting this and adding the detailed photos.

  • A very well written and photographed tutorial. I will definitely try this. Thanks for taking the time to wrie it!

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Sep 17, 2017

Lace Shawlette

The rotating loom mechanism makes the stitch pattern on this Lace Shawlette a breeze! Pick a self-striping yarn and let the nature of the yarn do the work for you! This shawlette makes the perfect accessory for the upcoming fall!

LOOM:  Double Knit Loom was used as a single sided rake, outside rail only, 51 pegs used.

YARN:  Approx 440 yds of worsted weight acrylic yarn. Sample used Lion Brand Landscapes in Boardwalk, 3 skeins. 

NOTIONS:  tapestry needle, row counter (optional).

GAUGE: Not relevant.

SIZE:  18 W x 68 L inches after blocking.

ABBREVIATIONS

ek=ewrap knit

p=purl

yo=yarn over. Ewrap the empty peg.

td=triple decrease. Over 3 pegs, peg 1 is on the right, peg 2 in the middle, peg 3 on the left. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2, move loop from peg 3 to peg 2. Peg 1 is empty, peg 2 has 3 loops on it, you will treat the 3 loops as one loop when working the peg, peg 3 is empty.

PATTERN NOTE: The pattern is worked in ewrap knit stitch.

INSTRUCTIONS

Cast on 51 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1: p to end of row.

Row 2: ek to end of row.

Row 3: p to end of row.

Row 4: ek to end of row.

Row 5: p to end of row.

Row 6: ek to end of row.

Row 7: p3, *yo, td, yo, ek3; rep from * to last 6 sts, yo, td, yo, p3.

Row 8: ek to end of row.

Row 9: p3, *ek3, yo, td, yo; rep from * to last 6 sts, ek3, p3.

Row 10: ek to end of row.

 

Rep Rows 7-10 until item measures 48 inches from cast on row.

Next 6 rows

Next row: p to end of row.

Next row: ek to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Next row: ek to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave all ends in.

Steam block to measurements.

Short how-to video coming soon!

 

 

7 Comments

  • Gorgeous work!!! Thank you so much for this.Great project for Loom-along on the KB site!

  • Love it. My next project.

  • The shawlette looks beautiful. I’m confused about what we are supposed to do to peg 2 after we’ve moved the loops from pegs 1 and 3 to peg 2. We yarnover past peg 1, then do we e-wrap and knit off peg 2 before doing a yarnover on peg 3? Do we purl it? Or do we slip peg 2 to move to peg 3?

  • What a gorgeous pattern! I bet it would be amazing in homespun yarn!

  • You are moving the loops from peg 1 to peg 2, then from peg 3 to peg 2. Pegs 1 and 3 are empty. You will ewrap (yarn over) peg 1, knit peg 2 (treating all the loops on peg 2 as one loop), ewrap (yarn over) peg 3. Hope this helps.

  • Can’t wait for the how to video so that I will be able to make this beautiful scarf.

  • Hi, thanks for your patience. It is almost ready and we are working really hard to be sure it contains everything you are needing. Pat

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Sep 11, 2017

Alani Lace Socks

It is not secret, knitting socks is one of my favorite past times. There is nothing more soothing than seeing those tiny stitches popping down from the knitting loom. The process is hypnotic and soothing. A little bit of lace lends these socks a delicate feel. 

LOOM: His & Her Sock Looms, sample used 56 peg, orange loom.
YARN: Approx. 250 yards DK weight yarn. Sample used 1 skein Malabrigo, Arroyo (335 yards, 100% superwash merino wool) Pool color.
NOTIONS: knitting tool, (2) peg markers, tapestry needle, (2) US 2 double pointed needles
GAUGE: 14 sts x 21 rows = 2 inches in stockinette
SIZE: Sample is approx women’s size 6.5-7.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately
k=knit stitch (note: the U-stitch was used for sample).
CO=cast on
BO=bind off
WY=working yarn
yo=yarn over
ssk=slip, slip, knit. Over two pegs. Peg 1 is on the right and peg 2 on the left. Move loop from peg 2 to peg 1. Knit peg 1, treating both loops on peg 1 as one loop.
k2tog=knit two together. Over two pegs. Peg is on the right, peg 2 on the left. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Knit peg 2, treating both loops on peg 1 as one loop.
st(s)=stitch(es)
rnd(s)=round(s)
rep=repeat
w&t=wrap and turn (lift the loop(s) from the peg, wrap working yarn around empty peg and replace held loop(s) back onto peg.)

PATTERN NOTES
Sample is approx Women’s size 6.5-7.5. To make a sock for other sizes on the 56 peg, orange loom, simply adjust the number of leg and foot rounds to equal desired lengths.

INSTRUCTIONS

CO 56 pegs, prepare to work in the round. (sample used ewrap cast on)

CUFF

Rnd 1-20: *k2, p2; rep from * to end.
Rnd 21: k to end of rnd.
Rnd 22: *yo, k1, ssk, k2tog, k1, yo, k1; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rep Rnds 21 and 22: 2 more times. Rep Row 21.

HEEL

Set peg/stitch markers on pegs 1 and 28.
Pegs 10-19 are the pegs that will be left unwrapped during the w&t process. There will be 9 pegs on either side of the center pegs that will be the W&T pegs.

Refer to Short-row heel/toe instructions at the end of pattern for specific details.

At end of heel instructions- working yarn will be at peg 1 of Heel (Peg 28).

FOOT

Next rnd: k28, * yo, k1, ssk, k2tog, k1, yo, k1; rep from * to end of rnd.
Next rnd: k to end of rnd

Rep last 2 rnds until foot measures
6.5″ from back of heel. To make item for larger sizes, continue working until sock foot measures (measure from back of heel) 2.5 inches less than desired total length. 

TOE

Follow the same instructions as for the Heel to create the toe. Refer to Short-row heel/toe instructions at the end of pattern for specific details.

FINISHING

Keeping the stitches from twisting, mount the first 28 stitches onto a double pointed needle. Place the remainder 28 stitches onto second double pointed needle.

Bind off all stitches using the Kitchener Stitch. Tutorial:
http://www.knittingboard.com/kitchener-stitch-page/

Weave ends in. Block lightly.

Short-row heel/toe Instructions for 56 Pegs

Row 1: k27, w&t peg 28
Row 2: k26, w&t peg 1
Row 3: k25, w&t peg 27
Row 4: k24, w&t peg 2
Row 5: k23, w&t peg 26
Row 6: k22, w&t peg 3
Row 7: k21, w&t peg 25
Row 8: k20, w&t peg 4
Row 9: k19, w&t peg 24
Row 10: k18, w&t peg 5
Row 11: k17, w&t peg 23
Row 12: k16, w&t peg 6
Row 13: k15, w&t peg 22
Row 14: k14, w&t peg 7
Row 15: k13, w&t peg 21
Row 16: k12, w&t peg 8
Row 17: k11, w&t peg 20
Row 18: k10, w&t peg 9

(Pegs 10-19 do not have wraps on them)

(Note: The following increase rows will require both lifting and working all previous wraps and stitches together as one as the pegs are knit and w&t’d. This can be up to 2 wraps and a stitch worked as one.)

Row 19: k11, w&t peg 21
Row 20: k12, w&t peg 8
Row 21: k13, w&t peg 22
Row 22: k14, w&t peg 7
Row 23: k15, w&t peg 23
Row 24: k16, w&t peg 6
Row 25: k17, w&t peg 24
Row 26: k18, w&t peg 5
Row 27: k19, w&t peg 25
Row 28: k20, w&t peg 4
Row 29: k21, w&t peg 26
Row 30: k22, w&t peg 3
Row 31: k23, w&t peg 27
Row 32: k24, w&t peg 2
Row 33: k25, w&t peg 28
Row 34: k26, w&t peg 1

Peg 1 and Peg 28 still have wraps on them. Continue to the foot instructions. On the first round, knit off the wraps together with the stitch (3 over 1) as the next round is worked.

 

3 Comments

  • i recently purchased the his/hers sock loom and i am having difficult time trying to figure out.
    i have read about 4 or 5 times and still nothing, i try step by step and still lost.

    Do you have a tutorial video for this his/hers sock loom???

    i see one for everything else, but no his/hers sock loom… thanks for any help given…

    i am a beginner, so need from start till finish…

  • This MIGHT become my first pair of loom knit socks!

  • Hi, these sock looms are used the same way as the others. You can follow the videos that we have for the other sock looms and it will work for this loom.

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Sep 4, 2017

Stitchology 36: Triple Wrap Around Stitch

This month’s stitch creates a lacy, yet still plush design that is reminiscent of cresting waves upon ocean beaches, seashells, or even fish scales (holey mackerel, lol!). It uses a new technique of wrapping back and forth between two pegs at a time to achieve this lovely effect.  Feel free to use this stitch for pretty much any type of project, as it is beautiful when viewed from either side.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The “triple wrap around” (TWA) referred to in this pattern is a combination of techniques worked on just two pegs, moving back and forth between them in the following manner (instructions are to begin from right to left/clockwise):

Step 1: S2 (carry working yarn (WY) behind pegs 1 & 2)

Step 2: Bring WY around to the front of peg 2 and SWYF (slip stitch with working yarn in front of peg: see below for more info) on peg 2 and on peg 1.

Step 3: Bring WY behind peg 1 and 2 and around to the front of the peg 2.  SWYF again on peg 2.

Step 4: Bring WY between peg 2 and peg 1 and around to the front of peg 1, creating an E-wrap.

Step 5: KO peg 1.  K peg 2.

 

(SWYF) directly translates to: Slip With Working Yarn in Front. This simply means that this peg will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg.

*Note: another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

 

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

*Note: The stitches in the chart that are bordered with darker lines are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.

When working a Flat Panel, the stitches outside the border square are worked only once: at the end of the odd rows, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed and at the beginning of the even rows, before the Repeating Pattern Rows are worked and repeated.

When working in the Round, only repeat the 4 stitches of the Repeating Pattern Rows within the border…the stitches outside the border squares are not worked at all.  Make sure to simply read each row from right to left and work in a clockwise direction.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 4, plus 2 extra stitches at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1: *k2, TWA, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 2:  k all sts.

Row 3: *TWA, k2, rep from * to last 2 sts, TWA.

Row 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rows 1-4 until desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 4):

Round 1:  *k2, TWA, rep from * to end.

Round 2: k all sts.

Round 3: *TWA, k2, rep from * to end.

Round 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rounds 1-4 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

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