Browsing articles from "June, 2017"
Jun 29, 2017

Elephant Baby Blanket (double knit)

Everyone loves the circus elephants. Now they are knit right into this thick, soft blanket for crib, or use as floor mat at playtime. Large enough to roll around on, 36” X 38” in soft Double Knit. Blanket is knit in two panels with colorful borders added all around.

 

Loom: All-n-One Loom set up for double knit with 1cm spacing

Yarn: Red Heart Essentials #5, 100% acrylic, machine wash and dry. 131 yds per skein. Colors: Greyhound, 8 skeins. Peony Pink and Teal, 2 skeins each. For a lighter Teal, use Turquoise. Scrap of black yarn for eyes

Stitches: Stockinette and Purl (as in single knit)

Notions: Knit hook, crochet hook, large sewing needle, graph of elephant for reference, or just use the written instructions. Optional: If you have (5) plastic sewing needles, they are great for holding the pieces in place for sewing.

Gauge: 3 stitches X 4 rows=1 inch

Size: Approx 36” long X 38” wide

Abbreviations: Approximately= aprox   St (sts)= stitch (stitches)   G=greyhound yarn  P=pink yarn   T=teal yarn   L=left   R=right

TECHNIQUES  

Basic Bind Off

1.  Work from end opposite the yarn tail; use your crochet hook to lift off the first loop on the back peg.

2.  Pick up the first loop on the front peg. Pull the front loop on hook through back loop.

Then, repeat picking up next back peg, then front loop; pull 1 thru 1. Repeat process to the end of the loom. Secure final stitch by pulling yarn tail through last loop on hook. With crochet hook, pull yarn tail into finished knit. Finish off at anchor yarns with this basic or crochet bind off.

Purl Stitch as in Single Knit

This is used in top and bottom border, alternating with Stockinette stitch. After a row of Stockinette stitch is complete, start the Purl stitches on back loom where yarn is connected. Work around, R to L, on each peg, working the purl stitches. You will end at beginning of loom, ready for next row of Stockinette.

1. Place the working yarn in front of the peg, below the loop on the peg. Insert the knit hook thru the loop on the peg from the top down.

2. Reach down to catch the working yarn with the knit hook. Pull the working yarn up through the loop on the peg, forming a new loop.

3. Hold the new loop on your hook. Then pull the loop that is still on the peg up and off the peg.

4. Place the new loop onto the peg. Gently tug on the working yarn to tighten the stitch.

Sewing together…

Start with the 2 pieces that are being sewn, lined up, so you can see the top of edge of each piece. Insert the sewing needle into the edge of one piece. Pick up the cross stitch in center of edge of knit. Pull the needle out and pick up the same cross stitch on other piece of knit

(border and panel). Work along both edges, continuing to pick up the cross yarn and alternating between the pieces. Draw the yarn snug as you move down the edges of the knit. This will pull the edges together without showing the sewing yarn. You do not want to sew the edge stitches, only pull them together for the invisible joining.

Instructions

Main panel: Cast on in Stockinette stitch for (48) sts in (P) yarn.  Lay an anchor yarn.

Row 1: Knit in Stockinette

Row 2: Purl as in single knit. This means to work around the entire loom on all (96) pegs doing single-knit Purl sts.

Repeat rows 1 and 2, 3 times. (6 rows).   Cut yarn with 3” tail.

Tie on (T) yarn and work rows 1 and 2, for a total of 3 times. (6 rows).

This completes the 2- color border on bottom of panel. Cut (T) yarn and tie on (G) yarn.

Work 12 rows in Stockinette st.

Working the Design:  (See blog entry for full instructions on color change.)

 Design (use graph above for guidance, or just follow row instructions):

Row 13:  Weave 14 sts in stockinette in (G). At peg 15, tie on (T) yarn. Lay (G) yarn aside and do not cut. Work 3 sts in (T) yarn, and drag yarn across the next 4 sts. Wrap the next 3 leg stitches and return the circular, carrying across the (G) sts. to cover all sides of the (P) sts, and lay aside. Hook over the (P) stitches. Pick up (G) and wrap all remaining pegs with full circular. Continue the row with (G) yarn on last 24 sts. When you work the return, carry the (G) yarn across the (T) sts. Do not cut either yarn.  (See process below.)

Tie on (T) yarn in center between rows of pegs.  Wrap the number of pegs needed. 

 

Take yarn across the (G) area to next (T) pegs, wrap number of pegs needed.

Pick up (G) yarn and wrap all pegs that are not covered with (T) yarn.

Wrap empty pegs maintaining the Stockinette wrap.  All pegs should be covered for this row. Hook over.

Row 14-15: Repeat row 1.

Row 16-17: Work 13 sts in Stockinette with (G) yarn. Work (P) yarn on next 4 sts , skip next 4 stitches, and wrap the next 3 leg stitches, and return, and hook over. Complete the row with the (G) yarn and hook over all (G) pegs.

Row 18: There will be 3 sections of pink in this row, because you will be starting the elephant’s trunk. Work the (P) sts, and then the (G) sts.

(G) 13 sts, (P)4 sts, (G) 4 sts, (P) 3 sts, (G) 5 sts, (P) 5 sts,(G) last 14 sts. Hook over all.

Starting with row 19, the pink will be dominant section. So start next rows with gray section and cut yarn at beginning of pink section. Tie on (P) and work section. Tie on new (G) yarn, once done with body of elephant. You will not have the (G) yarn going thru the (P) sts. Therefore, you will need to twist the 2 yarns at beginning of each section, so the sections will be continuous.

Row 19: This row will have 2 sections of (P) yarn. (G) 13 sts, (P) 11 sts, (G) 4 sts, (P) 7 sts, (G) 13 sts.

Row 20: This row will have 2 sections of (P) yarn. (G) 13 sts, (P) 12 sts, (G) 2 sts, (P) 9 sts, (G) 12 sts.

Row 21: (G) 9 sts, (P) 1 st, (G) 2 sts, (P) 19 sts, (G) 3 sts, (P) 3 sts, (G) 11

Row 22: (G) 9 sts, (P) 1 st, (G) 2 sts, (P) 19 sts, (G) 4 sts, (P) 2 sts, (G) 11

Row 23: (G) 9 sts, (P) 1 st, (G)1 st, , (P) 21 sts, (G) 3 sts, (P) 3 sts, (G) 10

Row 24: (G) 9sts, (P) 1 st, (G) 1 st, (P) 21 sts, (G) 4 sts, (P) 1 st, (G) 11

Row 25: (G) 9 sts, (P) 23 sts, (G) 16 sts

Row 26: Repeat row 25.

Row 27: (G) 10 sts, (P) 22 sts, (G) 16 sts.

Row 28: (G) 11 sts, (P) 21 sts, (G) 16 sts.

Row 29: (G) 12 sts, (P) 19 sts, (G) 17 sts.

Row 30: (G) 12 sts, (P) 18 sts, (G) 18 sts.

Row 31: (G) 13 sts, (P) 9 sts, (G) 2 sts, (P) 5 sts, (G) 19 sts.

Row 32: (G) 15 sts, (P) 5 sts, (G) 5 sts, (P) 3 sts, (G) 20 sts.

Cut and tie all (P) yarns together. Make sure the (G) yarn is ready to continue at beginning of row 33.

Continue in Stockinette stitch with (G) yarn for 116 rows, unless you want a smaller blanket.

Top Border of blanket

Work these border rows just as you did the bottom border, only start with the (T) yarn. Work rows 1 and 2, 3 times. (6 rows)

Tie off (T) yarn; add (P) yarn. Work rows 1 and 2, 3 times. (6 rows)

Work the basic bind off to remove from loom. Bind off at anchor yarn so that the edges match on both ends.

You will want to add some black yarn for the elephant’s eye, but this can be done later.

Panel 2  (Working the 2nd panel with the (T) Teal Elephant.)

Repeat all instructions for 2nd panel as for 1st panel, only substitute the (T) yarn for the (P) when working the Elephant design.

Borders of stripes are sewn into the blanket in center between the 2 panels, and down each side to give the blanket a wider size and more color.

Border strips (Knit 3)

Cast on 10 sts in Stockinette with (P) yarn. Lay anchor yarn.

Work (6) rows as in the Main Panel, rows 1 and 2.

Tie on the (T) yarn. Work (6) rows as in the Main Panel, rows 1 and 2.

Note: There is no need to cut and tie at all the color changes as the yarn can be carried thru the knit and not show. So lay the (P) yarn aside and carry thru between pegs 2 and 3 as you work the next (T) rows.

All stripes will be worked with Stockinette from this point to top border.

Work (6) rows in Stockinette with (P) yarn.

Work (8) rows in Stockinette with (T) yarn.

Continue working, alternating the colors with (8) rows each. Work a total of (9) sections with (T) yarn. Finish the border with one section of (6) rows in (P) yarn. Then work the (T) and (P) sections again as in Main Panel, rows 1 and 2.

The entire border is (12) sections of (P), and (11) sections of (T).

Once complete, bind off with basic bind off. Your border is a total of 172 rows, which matches the center panels.

Work (2) additional border strips.

Finishing and Sewing your Blanket

Be sure to give each elephant an eye. You can use the scrape of black yarn and sewing needle. Wrap thru to both sides on one stitch, and just tuck the yarn tails into the knit.

Lay the blanket out on bed or floor with the (3) borders in place. When sewing, be sure that the Purl stripes match across the top and bottom of the blanket. You may want to put a few plastic pins in each section before sewing to keep lined up.

Use invisible stitch to sew the sections together. Knot securely at each edge of a seam.

Blocking is not required, but may be done around the elephant designs to give them the best shape.

Your blanket is complete. You have a wonderful play pad for your little one. If a thinner blanket is desired, substitute the #5 yarn for a #4 worsted weight. Total size will be a bit smaller, but the designs will look just as nice.

1 Comment

  • This is so cute! I adore it! <3

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Jun 19, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Work Beads Into My Projects

 

 

 

 

 

After people get the hang of loom knitting beanies and scarves, the desire to expand their knowledge of different techniques grows.  In social media, I see questions for all sorts of things.  Among them are How do I knit with beads?  Do I need to string the beads first?  Can I add beads as I go?

Different people have different methods for attaching beads to their loom knit projects.  Today I will demonstrate 3 different ways to attach beads.  Other people may have other methods.

Let’s start with beads and go from there!

What kind of beads do I need to use?

You can use any kind of bead that you can fit your yarn though.  Most people I have seen in loom knitting tend to use pony beads.  Those are the larger plastic beads found in the kids crafts that have really large holes.  But you are not limited to those alone.  While you will need to use beads with larger holes on thicker yarn, you might actually be surprised what beads you can use when I show you how I thread them onto the yarn.

Do I need to use a beading needle to thread the beads on the yarn?  

I have made jewelry for years now.  I have used all sorts of beading needles.  One of my favorites is the needle that is made of twisted wire with an eye that will collapse shut after being threaded.  Very inexpensive to buy.  But not always the best when threading yarn through beads.  And as for the tapestry needles used to weave in the ends, those are always too big for beads unless you are using pony beads.

What do I use then if not a beading needle?

Dental floss.  WHAT??  Yes.  I like to use dental floss to thread my beads on the yarn.  I would like to mention that I use dental floss straight from the container that is unused…  I am all for recycling, but reusing dental floss is a bit much for me.

What kind of dental floss?

I prefer using the unflavored waxed dental floss.  No need to have mint flavored yarn.  And the dye they use on the flavored floss might stain the yarn.  Not sure.  But don’t want to chance it.

I like waxed because it makes it easier for ends of the floss to stick together and go through the hole of the bead.

What if I only have unwaxed floss?

You can use unwaxed if you have some beeswax or beading thread conditioner that you can coat the ends of the floss.  But if you have the thread conditioner, you might happen to have beading thread which you can use in the place of the floss.  Like using the floss because it’s a bit easier to work with.  Especially if it’s waxed.

But waxed dental floss is very inexpensive and therefore not a struggle to afford.

How do I add the beads?  Before or as I go?   Do both methods look the same?  Or different?

The way the beads look on the finished piece will definitely vary with the way the beads are added.  Let’s talk about each way and see how the beads look when the work is finished.

Adding Beads Before Starting

The easiest way would be to string all the beads you will need before starting to knit.

You will need to make sure you have enough or more than you will need.  If not, you will need to cut the yarn, add more beads, and join the new yarn leaving you will extra ends to weave in later.

Also if you are using more than 1 color bead and are wanting to create a pattern with the color, you will need to make sure they are strung on the yarn in the order that you will need them so that the first one you will need will be last one you will string onto the yarn and the last you will will need will be the first you will string onto the yarn.

How to thread the beads on the yarn

 

 

First remove a piece of floss from the spool about 10″ to 12″ long so that when folded in half you have about 6″ of floss to work with.

 

 

 

 

 

Run the 2 ends of the floss between your fingers so they will stick together.

Thread the end of the floss through the bead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gently pull the yarn through the bead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue stringing the beads onto the yarn until all the beads you will need are on the working yarn.  As I have mentioned already, having more than you need is always better than not having enough.  Just keep the beads pushed down the yarn.

If the end of the floss starts to fray, just trim it or replace with a new piece.

 

 

 

Start your knitting with the end of the yarn.  Keep pushing the beads on down the yarn until you need them.

 

 

 

When you are ready to use a bead, put it in between the 2 pegs where you want it to go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work the next stitch leaving the bead between the pegs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This method is great when you want to place a bead between every stitch.

 

 

 

 

With this method, you need to remember that the yarn will run through the hole of the bead horizontally with only 1 strand of yarn through the bead.

 

 

 

If you are using all knits, the beads will try to hide behind the stitches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The beads will be more prominent when worked with purls stitches on either side of the bead instead of knits.

It’s good to keep that in mind when adding beads to your work.

 

 

 

Adding Beads As You Go

This method is great when you don’t really know how many beads you will need because you are just winging it by placing beads randomly or just don’t want to count them out.  No judgement on that last one…  Nope.  Been there.  Done that.

First thing to remember about both of these methods is that when beads are added as you go, the stitch itself will run through the bead vertically with both strands of the stitch, not horizontally with only 1 strand like the previous method.

Method 1

 

 

When adding a bead onto the stitch, you will need to first draw up the the new stitch like working a true knit stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completely remove the old stitch from the peg and run the dental floss through the new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

String the bead onto the floss and then onto the loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten up the loop after getting the bead down behind the peg and place the loop onto the peg itself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bead is now on the peg with the new stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This method will leave a “hole” on each side of the bead since the stitch itself is sort of cinched through the hole of the bead.

Therefore, I would not recommend using this method on every stitch.  But at least skipping a stitch between each bead.

 

 

 

 

Method 2

 

 

With the second method of adding beads as you go, draw up a new stitch but unlike Method 1 do not remove the stitch from the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As before, run the floss through the loop and run the bead onto the loop.

But this time the bead will be in front of the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place the new loop onto the peg after tightening up the loop so there is not any slack.

Remember to not take the old loop off the peg so that there are 2 loops on the peg with the bead in front of the peg.

Continue with the rest of the row.

 

 

 

 

 

On the next row when the peg with the bead is ready to be worked,  PURL that stitch so the the bead will be to the front of the work.

If you knit the stitch, the bead will be at the back of the work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There may be a tiny gap at the top and bottom of the bead, but with this method the bead will sit nicely in front of the fabric.

 

 

 

Like I said before, different people have different ways to add beads to embellish their knits.  I hope any of these ways will help when you decide to use beads with your loom knitting projects as well.

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Jun 10, 2017

Men’s Vest

 

Knit with a simple stitch, this vest is the perfect way to begin loom knitting garments. Worn over a dress shirt with a tie lending a bit of warmth and style.

LOOM:  All-n-One Loom with 20-peg extenders

YARN:  Approx 770 yds of worsted weight yarn. Caron Simply Soft in Navy color 570(600, 630) yds, and Gray color 120 (130, 140 yds) was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  knitting tool, tapestry needle, 6 stitch markers to mark the shoulders and back of neck, stitch holder.

GAUGE: 20 sts x 32 rows=4 inches

SIZE:  S (M, L) Sample shown in Small. Meant to fit loosely.

ABBREVIATIONS

k=knit

p=purl

st(s)=stitch(es)

k1f&b=knit one front and back (an increase)

rem=remain

MC=Main color (Gray)

CC=Contrasting color (Navy)

Approx=Approximately

INSTRUCTIONS

BACK

Using CC, cast on 100 (110, 118) sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1-Row 20: *k2, p2; rep from * to last 2 sts, k2. Cut CC, join MC.

Row 21: Move last loop over one peg to leave one peg open (move loop from peg 100 to peg 101; from peg 110 to peg 111; from peg 118 to peg 119). K1f&b,k to end of row.  (101, 111,119 sts)

Row 22: k to end of row.

Rep Row 22 until panel measures approx 14.5 (15.5, 16.5) inches.

Tip: recommend to keep track of the number of rows, as you will need to match the front with the same number of rows.

Underarm Shaping

Bind off 6 sts at beginning of next 2 rows.

Continue working in knit stitch until piece measures 24.5 (25.5, 26.5) inches.

Tip: recommend to keep track of the number of rows, as you will need to match the front with the same number of rows.

Bind off the neckline using basic bind off method— 27 (30, 33) sts for shoulder stitches, 35 (39, 39) sts for back of next stitches, and 27 (30, 33) sts for shoulder stitches.

Tip: You can mark them with stitch markers, as you will need to line up the front shoulders to the back for seaming.

FRONT

Follow instructions as for Back from Row 1-Row 21.

Row 22: *k3, p1; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 23: k to end of row.

Rep Row 22-23 until panel measures approx 14.5 (15.5, 16.5) inches

Tip: recommend to keep track of the number of rows, to match the back.  

Underarm Shaping

Bind off 6 sts at beginning of next 2 rows while maintaining the stitch pattern.

(Example for Large Size: First row: bind off first 6 sts of the row, k1, p1, *k3, p1; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3. (113 sts rem).

Next row:  bind off first 6 sts of row, k to end. (107 sts rem).

**Next row: k1, p1, *k3,p1; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3.

 Next row: k to end of row.**

Rep from ** to ** until piece measures 24.5 (25.5, 26.5) inches.

Tip: recommend to keep track of the number of rows, to match the Back.

Work as for Back, including all shaping. When piece measures 14.5 (15.5, 16.5) inches, (at the point of the shoulder shaping), begin the neck shaping too.

Begin Neck Shaping

Work to center st in established stitch pattern, remove center stitch and place it on a stitch holder.  Attach another ball of yarn on next stitch and complete row (using the new ball of yarn). Work both sides at once.

Decreasing 1 st at each neck edge every 2nd  row, 9x (6x, 3x), then every 4th row 8x (13x, 17x).

Continue in established stitch pattern until piece measures 24.5 (25.5, 26.5) inches.

Bind off using basic bind off method.

Block pieces lightly before assembly.

ASSEMBLY

Join side seams using mattress stitch.

Weave in all ends.

Seam each shoulder 27 (30,33) sts of front to 27 (30, 33) sts of back.

Armhole Edging
(make 2)

Using CC, cast on 100 (110, 120) sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1-3: *k2, p2; rep from * end.

Bind off with basic bind off method.

Seam Armhole Edging to each armhole opening using mattress stitch.

Neck Edging

Using CC, cast on 112 (120, 148) sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1-3: *k2, p2; rep from * to end.

Bind off with basic bind off method.

Locate the center stitch of the neckline opening, remove stitch from stitch holder, and pass the tapestry needle through it and begin mattress stitch seaming the Neck Edging at that point all the way around.

Weave all ends in. Block lightly.

Have questions or comments, please feel free to contact Isela Phelps by leaving a comment below. 

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Jun 5, 2017

Stitchology 33: Encased Ribbing

This is a wonderful stitch that, like last month’s choice, creates an amazingly plush and reversible fabric.  Feel free to use this for pretty much any type of project, as it is beautiful when viewed on either side. Another terrific thing about this stitch is that it is absolutely perfect for summer knitting, as its only two pattern rows are so easy to remember and work on the go!

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

(SWYF) x2 directly translates to: Slip With Working Yarn in Front 2 times. This simply means that the next 2 pegs will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg. Repeat for the next peg in line.

*Note: another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

*Note: The stitches in the chart that are bordered with darker squares are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.

When working a Flat Panel, the stitches after the border square are worked only once: at the end of the first row, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed and at the beginning of the 2nd row, before the Repeating Pattern Rows are worked and repeated.

When working in the Round, only repeat the 4 stitches of the Repeat Pattern Rows within the border…the stitches after the border squares are not worked at all.  Make sure to simply read each row from right to left and work in a clockwise direction.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 4, plus 2 extra stitches at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1: *k2, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 2:  (SWYF) x2, *p2, (SWYF) x2, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rows 1 & 2 until desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 4):

Round 1: *k2, p2, rep from * to end.

Round 2: *(SWYF) x2, p2, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rounds 1 & 2 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

3 Comments

  • The notes on the entire square that is pictured above, are listed at the Ravelry project listing for this stitch here: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/encased-ribbing-stitchology-33 :)

  • I was wondering if there is a way to make adults hats on the adjustable sock loom sock loom?

  • Hi Dawn :)

    Sure, there is always a way to do what you want. The trick is figuring out the way to get it done, haha! ;) In this case, the whole idea hinges on the number of pegs available and the gauge of the loom itself. If you are talking about the Sock Loom 2: http://www.knittingboard.com/sock-loom-2/ , there are 54 pegs with a gauge of 3/8″ center to center of pegs, which works beautifully with worsted weight yarn. This may not be enough pegs to make an adult hat the traditional way, but you could always make them in panels, stitch them together and gather the top. You could also try to loosely ewrap the pegs for the main stitch, or use a very loose stitch pattern, such as the Figure 8 stitch…this would serve to make the overall circumference wider to help accommodate an adult sized head. Now if you were talking the All-n-One Loom, which has the same gauge a the Sock Loom 2, then there would absolutely be no trouble using any kind of stitch you desire to make an adult hat.

    The best way to determine if this will work for you on a loom with fewer pegs is to work a swatch of about 4″ by 4″ in your desired stitch and see how many pegs (& rows) it takes to equal that 4″. Take that total peg count and divide it by 4, which gives you your stitch count per inch. Then multiply this number by the inches needed for your hat and you will end up with the number of pegs needed to make that work.

    So: Make a 4″ x 4″ swatch. Total # of stitches ÷ 4 = stitches per inch. Stitches per inch x head circumference in inches = total number of pegs needed. :)

    Hope that helps!
    Bethany~

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