Browsing articles from "January, 2017"
Jan 29, 2017

Eureka Knee Highs

Keep your feet and legs comfy and warm with these knee highs knit in luxurious merino superwash wool.  Wear them pulled up for knee highs or let them gather around the ankles as slouchy socks.

KNITTING LOOM: Sock Loom 2

YARN:  300 yrds of worsted weight superwash wool yarn.  Plymouth Select Worsted Merino Superwash in color #43 (100% superwash merino wool, 218 yards per hank)

NOTIONS:  knitting tool, tapestry needle, 2 double pointed needles

GAUGE: 10 sts x 16 rounds = 2” in flat knit stitch

SIZE:  Fits a women’s size 8.  To make the socks larger/smaller, work more/less rounds in the foot area.

 

ABBREVIATIONS

k=knit stitch (note: Work the knits on cuff with the true knit stitch.  Work the knits on the rest of the sock with the flat knit stitch.).

p=purl stitch, CO=Cast on, st(s)=stitch(es), rnd(s)=round(s), Rep=repeat, W&T=wrap & turn (Remove the stitch from the peg.  Wrap the working yarn around the peg by bringing it to the back of the peg and around to the front of the peg so the working yarn ends up at the front of the loom ready to work the next stitch.)

INSTRUCTIONS (Make 2)

CO 40 pegs and prepare to work in the round

Leg

Rnds 1 – 15: P all

Rnds 16 – 20:  K all

Rnds 21 – 30:  P all

Rnds 31 – 75:  rep rnds 16 – 30, 3 times

Rnds 76 – 80:  *K2, P2, rep from * around

Rnds 81 – 95:  K all

 

Heel

Short row heel over 20 pegs

Row 1:  K pegs 1 – 19, W&T peg 20

Row 2:  K pegs 19 – 2, W&T peg 1

Row 3:  K pegs 2 – 18, W&T peg 19

Row 4:  K pegs 18 – 3, W&T peg 2

Row 5:  K pegs 3 – 17, W&T peg 18

Row 6:  K pegs 17 – 4, W&T peg 3

Row 7:  K pegs 4 – 16, W&T peg 17

Row 8:  K pegs 16 – 5, W&T peg 4

Row 9:  K pegs 5 – 15, W&T peg 16

Row 10:  K pegs 15 – 6, W&T peg 5

Row 11:  K pegs 6 – 14, W&T peg 15

Row 12:  K pegs 14 – 7, W&T peg 6

Row 13:  K pegs 7 – 13, W&T peg 14

Row 14:  K pegs 13 – 8, W&T peg 7

Row 15:  K pegs 8 – 14, W&T peg 15

Row 16:  K pegs 14 – 7, W&T peg 6

Row 17:  K pegs 7 – 15, W&T peg 16

Row 18:  K pegs 15 – 6, W&T peg 5

Row 19:  K pegs 6 – 16, W&T peg 17

Row 20:  K pegs 16 – 5, W&T peg 4

Row 21:  K pegs 5 – 17, W&T peg 18

Row 22:  K pegs 17 – 4, W&T peg 3

Row 23:  K pegs 4 – 18, W&T peg 19

Row 24:  K pegs 18 – 3, W&T peg 2

Row 25:  K pegs 3 – 19, W&T peg 20

Row 26:  K pegs 19 – 2, W&T peg 1

 

Sole and Foot

 Next rnd:  K all

Rep last rnd until foot measures 7” from the heel or 1.5” – 2” less than the length of the foot (depending on snugness desired).

 

Toe

Rep short row heel instructions for the toe.

When finished, there will 3 loops on pegs 1 and 20.  Lift the bottom wraps over the top loop on both pegs.

 

 

Grafting the Toe Close

Remove stitches from pegs 40 – 21 and place on one double pointed needle.

Remove the remaining stitches on a second double pointed needle.

Using the kitchener stitch, graft the toe closed.

Instructions for grafting with the kitchener stitch with needles can be found in Loom FAQs:  What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?

Alternate method of grafting:  Using the method demonstrated in Loom FAQs:  What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?, transfer the stitches from pegs 1 – 20 to pegs 40 – 21 and use the kitchener stitch to graft the toe closed.

 

If you have questions or comments, please feel free to contact Renita Harvey by leaving a comment below.

 

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Jan 22, 2017

Nyahbelle’s Mermaid Tail

Every little girl at some point dreams of being a little mermaid. Let your little one’s imagination come to life with this cozy mermaid tail cocoon.

LOOM:  Knitting loom: 28” with Extenders (168 pegs total) + 6 peg sliders (2).

YARN: Approx 2,000 yards of worsted weight wool blend. Knit Picks Chroma, 70% superwash wool, 30% nylon, 198 yds/100g (10 balls) in Lupine color was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Cable needle, knitting tool, row counter (optional), cable needle

GAUGE: 9 sts x 13 rnds = 2” in stockinette

SIZE: 48” L x 17  W cocoon; 26” tail length.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately
k=knit stitch (note: the true knit stitch is recommended for this project with this type of yarn)
p=purl stitch
CO=Cast on
st(s)=stitch(es)
rnd(s)=round(s)
Rem=remain
st(s)=stitch(es)
cn=cable needle
Back Cross (BCP)=With the working yarn held to the front of the loom, slip 1 stitch to cn and hold towards the center of the loom (peg is now empty), knit the next peg then move this loop to the emptied peg, place the stitch from the cn on the empty peg then proceed to purl it.
Front Cross (FCP)=With the working yarn held to the center of the loom, slip 1 stitch to cn and hold towards the front of the loom between the pegs (peg is now empty), purl the next peg then move this loop to the emptied peg, place the peg from the cn on the empty peg, proceed to knit it.

Basic Hourglass Chart-multiple of 8 sts

INSTRUCTIONS

Set the knitting at 168 pegs, using the peg extenders.

Cast on 168 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1, 3, 5, 7, 9: k to end of row.

Row 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: p to end of row.

Row 11: k8, [work Row 1 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 12: p8, [work Row 2 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8

Row 13: k8, [work Row 3 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 14: p8, [work Row 4 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8

Row 15: k8, [work Row 5 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 16: p8, [work Row 6 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row 17: k8, [work Row 7 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 18: p8, [work Row 8 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  19: k8, [work Row 9 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 20: p8, [work Row 10 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  21: k8, [work Row 11 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 22: p8, [work Row 12 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  23: k8, [work Row 13 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 24: p8, [work Row 14 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  25: k8, [work Row 15 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 26: p8, [work Row 16 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Rep Row 11-Row 26: 4 more times.

From this point forward, you will be working in the round. Join to work in the round.

**Next Rnd: work Rnd 1 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 2 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 3 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 4 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 5 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 6 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 7 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 8 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 9 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 10 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 11 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 12 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 13 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 14 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 15 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 16 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.**

Rep from ** to ** 12 more times.

Next 4 rnds: *k2, p2; rep from * to end.

Remove all the stitches off the knitting loom onto a piece of contrasting color yarn.

Adjust the knitting loom and set it to 84 pegs using the 6 peg sliders, instead of the extenders.

Place the stitches back on the knitting loom, placing two stitches per peg.

Next rnd: *k2tog, p2tog; rep from * to end. (84 sts).

Basic bind off.

Centering the vertical opening at the cast on edge (created by the first 130 rows), sew the bind off section flat using the mattress stitch.

Weave all ends in.

Fin

(Make 2)

Cast on 84 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1: k to end.

Row 2: p2tog, p to end.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2 until 20 sts remain.

Bind off with basic bind off method.

Mattress stitch together the two bind off edges.

Assembly

Centering the seam from the first 130 rows (where the opening is at the top of the cocoon), mattress stitch the straight edge of the tail around the cocoon, starting at the midpoint on the back of the tail and continuing to the front then around the back of the tail to the midpoint.

 

 

 

Have questions or comments, please feel free to contact Isela Phelps by leaving a comment below. 

 

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9 Comments

  • I want to say this looks amazing!! I am just having a trouble with the bcp and fcp. I don’t understand “slip stitch to cn” then how the beg becomes empty. Thank you for all your help.

  • You are removing the loop from the peg and putting it on a cable needle.

  • Need a video of this.

  • Is there any way this could be done on the super afghan loom? Just curious. Thank you.

  • Can you do this on the super afghan loom? I don’t have the 28″ knitting loom with extenders. Thank you.

  • Donna, the pattern starts off as a flat panel and then you have to knit it in the round. You could knit it all flat then seam it but as it is written, it was designed to be knitted in the round.

  • Thank you. After reading the pattern I think it would be easier if I just invested in the 28″ loom. I can always use a new one in my collection. I already have 7 different looms you all sell and I use them all. Keep making them and I will keep buying them!

  • I think this is amazing. I have just taken an interest in loom knitting and I am wondering if you can help me with two random questions.

    1. Where can I find that casting tool that is used to cast on? what is it called?
    2. Why do you skip pegs for some patterns and how do you decide which ones to skip?

  • Is there a video of how to do the hourglass stitch from left to right and then right to left? I am confused which part of the cross has the purl stitch. Thank you!

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Jan 19, 2017

Poncho with Fingerless Mittens (double knit)

This poncho pattern comes with matching fingerless mittens.Fun and easy to wear for all sizes-warm, but not bulky! When a coat is too much, but it’s chilly out, this poncho is perfect.

Loom: 28” Loom +Extenders Set up for double knit using small wood spacers at 1 cm spacing

Yarn: Patons Shetland Chunky, 75% Acrylic, 25% Wool #5, aprox 121 yds per skein. Total used in sample is 14 skeins. Color is Med Blue.

Stitches: Stockinette, Knit and Purl

Notions: Knit hook, Crochet hook, Sewing/darning needle

Size: One size fits most adults.

Gauge: 8 sts x 14 rows=3”

Finished Dimensions: 44” wide x 62” long from front hem to back hem.

Poncho is designed in 3 pieces, the Right side, the Left side, and the Hood, with a simple crocheted tie for neckline. Gloves are each worked in one piece. All edging is accented with Purl stitches, and we call this effect, Popcorn Stitches. The rest of the poncho is done with basic double knit stockinette.

Basic Abbreviations Used:  P=purl    K=knit    aprox=approximately    st(sts)=stitch (stitches)    R=right    L=left

The Popcorn is worked on all sides of each, the R and L side. When the pieces are joined together down front and back of poncho, the Popcorn really stands out.

Popcorn Stitch: Work Purl stitch on every other stitch, on both sides of the loom. One row will start with purl st and the next row will start with knit stitch. Alternate the knit and purl stitches as you go across the loom. Directions for starting each row will be given at beginning of the section.

Left side of poncho: Cast on 58 sts in stockinette. Lay anchor yarn.
Rows 1-14: Work in Popcorn, starting first row with K stitch. Work across loom alternating the K st with the Purl st. Start the next row with P st and alternate the knit and purl across the loom.
Row 15: Start row with P st and continue Popcorn for 8 sts. Work 44 sts in Stockinette St, and last 6 sts in Popcorn to end.
Repeat row 15 until the piece is aprox 26” long, less border, or if counting rows, you will have worked aprox 122 rows. For shorter poncho, work less rows.

Neckline/Shoulder: We are creating the opening for the neck.
Bind off 6 stitches at end of loom, or R side of loom. Start this bind off at last stitch or right edge of knit. Place last bind off loop onto next peg with yarn. This will end the Popcorn on R side of knitted piece. On next row, be sure to lift both loops from the bind off when completing this row.

Work 21 rows on remaining 52 stitches. This is the side of the neckline across shoulder. Now, you want to place the 6 sts back onto the right side of the knitted poncho center. To do this, continue row 21 for additional 6 stitches. Lay anchor yarn over just these 6 new stitches. Complete this row with hook over, but the 6 new stitches will just have one loop. You can hook them over after the next full row. Start the Popcorn on this row for the 6 new stitches.
Continue working the next 122 rows with 8 sts Popcorn, 44 sts Stockinette, 6 sts Popcorn.
Work 14 rows in Popcorn so that finish is same as the beginning.

Right Side Of Poncho: Right side of poncho is knit just like the left side except, work row 15 as, 6 Popcorn stitches, 44 Stockinette stitches and 8 Popcorn stitches. Work the neckline/shoulder from the beginning of the loom, or first 6 sts. Before taking this piece off loom, lay next to Left side to confirm that they are the same length. Adjust if necessary.

Hood: The hood is worked with Popcorn stitch around the face. It will fold back before sewing to poncho. (if desired)
Cast On 32 stitches in Stockinette stitch. Lay anchor yarn.
Work 24 sts in Stockinette, 8 sts in Popcorn across the 32 cast on stitches.
Repeat this row until the piece measures aprox 28” in length.
Bind off of loom and anchor yarn loosely with 2 loop method. (1 thru 1 loops). Set aside for sewing.
Make a drawstring with crochet chain aprox 50”, completed length.

Sewing and Finishing:
The 2 sides of the poncho will be joined so that the neckline is lined up and creates a soft rectangular opening. This is where the hood will be attached. You want to seam the two sides together using matching yarn and the darning needle. You are joining the 6 st edges of the popcorn stitches.
Sew with invisible stitch. Join one seam (back of poncho) from bottom hem to neckline opening (back of neckline). When sewing the front of poncho, leave the top 5-6” open at neckline, and sew from this point to hem. Do some reinforcement stitches at neckline opening.
Your poncho is now in one piece-just need to add the hood. Fold the hood over so that the popcorn edges are together. Seam the back of hood from top to bottom edge. Slip the hood on your head to determine how deep you want it to be as this will help you decide if folding the popcorn edge over is desirable.
The hood is sewn to the poncho by matching the center of hood to center of back at back seam. Match the front edges of the hood to the front top edge of the neckline. Tack these points, and a few others in between. This will keep the hood lined up with the poncho for complete sewing. Sew securely all around the neck opening, so that the hood is now part of the poncho.  Do this using invisible stitch.
Attaching the Crochet Tie: Lay the crochet tie around neckline seam so that the ends are equal length at front of hood. There should be about 12” of crochet tie at each side of hood. Stitch the tie to the neckline seam with matching yarn and secure at each outer front edge of hood.
(Optional)  You may want to knot the ends of tie or sew on a small pompom or bead.  Your poncho is ready to wear.

Matching Fingerless Gloves: These are perfect to add some warmth to the arms without the bulk of full gloves. You can make them as long as desired. Measure from base of fingers to about 3” from elbow. This will bring them right up under the edge of poncho. Our sample makes a glove about 10” around the arm and 12” long. You can adjust these measurements as desired.
Cast on 24 stitches. Work 8 rows in popcorn stitch.
Row 9-54: Work in Stockinette.
Bind off loosely with basic bind off (1 loop over 1).
Sew the seam to close in glove. Start at bind off edge, opposite end from popcorn, and sew aprox 1”. Leave thumb opening 1-1/2”. Sew from thumb opening to top of glove at popcorn edge. Knot securely. Make a 2nd glove.

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6 Comments

  • I am using Redheadt worsted weight yarn this has turned out 15 inches widi am trying to block it to 8 any suggestions

  • That comment was for Stitchology above

  • Love the outfit. I hope one day I can make it. I’m just learning. But will give it a try.

  • Beginner beginner! Can any knit stitch be used for the stockinette stitch? Is there any video to go by for this project available for purchase or viewing? I love this poncho!

    Jill

  • The knit stitch for double knitting stockinette is one. We have some videos in the video section of the website that shows the stockinette in double knit.

  • I want to make the poncho but I only have the AIO, I know that I’ll get a smaller poncho, but I wonder if that could work if I set the wooden spacer in the second configuration.

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Jan 16, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Tighten The Cast On?

 

 

 

 

 

While there are lots of ways to cast on a project, the cast on we learn first is the E-wrap Cast On.  But most people do not like to use it because it is also the loosest cast on.  Which, of course, leads to questions…  Why is my cast on edge so loose?  How can I make it tighter?

Most will answer by saying “use a different cast on”.  There really is a cast on for every type of project.  And we all have our favorite cast on.  But most of those do have have enough stretch for some projects.

I want a stretchy cast on but the e-wrap cast on is still too loose making the edge messy!   Not a question but is still a cry for help.  Let’s get going on how to work a not-so-messy-tight-and-tidy e-wrap cast on!

How do I work an e-wrap cast on?

If you think that we are learning a new cast on, then you might be a bit disappointed.  You will not be disappointed in the outcome of this e-wrap cast on when finished though.

While most already know how to work an e-wrap cast on, there are some that need to make a small adjustment in order to get a cleaner finish.  And that small adjustment is how you use the slip knot to start.

If you are new to loom knitting, then here is how to work an e-wrap cast on.

First, make a slip knot.  But do not put it on the first or last peg depending on if you are working a flat panel or in the round.  You will want to use an anchor peg.  If your loom doesn’t have an separate anchor peg, then you will need to use an adjacent peg to put the slip knot on.  Then you will take it off after you get going on your project.  Just be sure to not use it as as a loop on the cast on.

Why can I not use the slip knot as the first loop?

Besides not having a knot in your work, you will not be able to completely finish tightening up the cast on if you use the slip knot as the first loop.

Flat Panel

If working a flat panel, most patterns are written so that the first row is worked from right to left.  That means that the cast on must be worked from left to right.

 

This is my Peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will be the last peg for my flat panel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have more pegs than being used, place the slip knot next to the last peg so you are starting your cast on on the last peg of row 1.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are using all the pegs on a round loom, then you will need to actually place the slip knot on the first peg.  Then start working the cast on to the right back around ending on the first peg.

In The Round

 

 

For hats and other projects worked in the round, place the slip knot on the last peg and then work the cast on from the first peg around from right to left.

 

 

 

 

 

How do you work the e-wrap cast on after the slip knot is placed?

 

 

Wrap each peg by bringing the working yarn around the back of the peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to the front and around to the back again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then go the back of the next peg and wrap it in the same manner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue wrapping all the pegs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pegs look like this when the cast on is finished.

 

 

 

And how the cast on looks from the top of the pegs.

 

 

Do I need to work the 1st row on a flat panel from right to left?  Or work from right to left when working in the round?  Why can I not go in the other direction?

Generally speaking, yes.  While most of use are more comfortable working only one direction, patterns are written this way for a good reason.  Consistency is one.  Also certain stitches like cables are written this way so the stitches can be worked correctly.

A lot of patterns can be worked either way.  But remember when you want to say it’s easier working in a certain direction:  when working a flat panel, you must work in both directions.  That cannot be avoided.

Therefore the sooner you start being consistent with working row 1 from right to left and always working in the round from right to left, the easier it will be to follow patterns that require it.

Do you work a row of stitches before starting row 1?

The e-wrap cast on is just that.  Every peg is wrapped once.  Once the number of pegs are wrapped, the cast on is complete, and row 1 is ready to be worked.

The cast on is NOT considered the first row.  It’s more like the foundation to get started.

How do I tighten the cast on so it’s not messy and loose?

While you can tighten the cast on while it’s still on the loom, I wait until it’s off the loom before starting.

Now is when the magic happens.

 

On a flat panel, start on the end opposite from the tail.   I hold my panel with the tail on the left side and work from the right to the left.

 

 

 

 

 

When working in the round, find the last stitch next to the tail which was the last stitch in each round.  Then you will work from the left to the right around the piece to the tail.

 

 

 

 

 

I will continue to demonstrate on a flat panel.

 

 

 

Find the first loop and with your fingers or loom pick,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gently pull it snug from the edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then find the next loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and gently pull it snug.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue with each stitch until you get to the tail.  With each stitch, the loop you are pulling will get bigger.

 

 

Then when the tail is reached, the loop itself will disappear as it’s pulled snugly.  This is why the slip knot is not used as a cast on loop.  You will not be able to tighten up that last loop with the tail if you used a slip knot.

 

 

 

 

The cast on will then be tidier but still stretchy.

 

 

 

I preferred the yarn over (double e-wrap) cast on for the longest time when I needed a cast on that is stretchy.  But now I prefer to tighten the e-wrap cast on instead.  It gives you more control over how tight you make the cast on edge but still has stretch.

I hope this helps so that everyone has a nice, tight, and tidy e-wrap cast on!  Happy loom knitting!

2 Comments

  • Thank you for the very informative article. I am going make a small swatch and try this technique.

  • Wow, this is a great tip! I prefer double e wrapping each peg as my cast on because it is neater, but I am going to try this on my next project!

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Jan 8, 2017

Snowman Slipper Socks (for 18” dolls)

Whimsical Loom Knits – January 2017   Designed by Jenny Stark

The air is super frosty in this part of the world.  Surprise your favorite doll collector with some whimsical snowman slipper socks to keep their dolly’s toes warm and cozy.

Knitting Loom: KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Small amounts of worsted weight yarn in two different colors.  Samples include Red Heart Super Saver in Artists Print (CC) and Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice in White (MC).

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, needle and thread (for embellishments).

Embellishments: 4 black 7mm buttons, 2 orange 7mm buttons, small amount of black yarn for stitching mouths.

Gauge: 11 stitches & 18 rows = 2″ in stockinette stitch.

Finished Size: Fits 18″ dolls.

Special Techniques:

Wrap & Turn (W&T):  Lift stitch(es) on peg.  Wrap working yarn around the peg.  Replace held stitch(es) on to peg above the wrap just created.  Continue on as directed in the pattern.

Instructions

Using CC, Cast on 20 stitches. Join to work in the round.

Cuff: Rounds 1-4:  K2, P2 to end of round.  Cut CC.

Leg: With White (MC),  knit 4 rounds.

Short row shaping: Continue working with White (MC).

Knit pegs 1-9.  W&T on 10.

Knit pegs 9-2.  W&T on 1.

Knit pegs 2-8.  W&T on 9.

Knit pegs 8-3.  W&T on 2.

Knit pegs 3-7.  W&T on 8.

Knit pegs 7-4.  W&T on 3.

Knit pegs 4-8.  W&T on 9.

Knit pegs 8-3.  W&T on 2.

Knit pegs 3-9.  W&T on 10.

Knit pegs 9-2.  W&T on 1.

Knit pegs 2–20.

Knit pegs 1-20.

Foot: Continuing with White (MC), knit 14 more rounds.

Remove from the loom using the gathered removal method.

Weave in all ends.

Finishing: Create ‘eyes’ by stitching two black buttons on each slipper sock.

Make a ‘carrot nose’ by stitching an orange button on each slipper sock.

Create a ‘mouth’ on each slipper sock using the black yarn.

Weave in any remaining threads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wishing you much luck and happiness in 2017!

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2 Comments

  • Those are so cute. Got to make some

  • These are so cute. My granddaughter just got an American Doll for Christmas, she is also learning to loom. We are going to have some fun making these.

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Jan 2, 2017

Stitchology 28: Large Herringbone

**Pattern updated Jan 9, 2017 (specifically Row 5).

The stitch we’ll be working up this month is wonderful for its simple symmetry and lines.  The bold repeating herringbone pattern makes this a wonderful stitch for deep texture and coziness! Worked in this winter white, it makes me think of snow clad forest branches. I can visualize this being used for hats, sweaters, scarves, socks, you name it!  This would also work beautifully as a companion to the smaller herringbone published in the very first Stitchology column as interesting play of texture in any project.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here and here.

Large Herringbone Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight Wool (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in mochi)  

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 16 sts—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
rep: repeat
CO: cast on
k:  knit
p: purl
wy: working yarn
BO: bind off

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 1:  [k2, p2] rep twice, k1, p2, k2, p2, k1.

Row 2:  p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1.

Row 3: k1, p1, k2, p5, p2, k2, p1.

Row 4: k2, p2, k2, p1, k1, p1. k2, p2, k3.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 37 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  p37.

Row 2:  k37.

Row 3:  p37.

Row 4:  k37.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: p2, [k2, p2] twice, k1, p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1, [p2, k2] twice, p2.

Row 6: k3, *p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1  rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 7: p2, *k1, p1, k2, p2, k5, p2, k2, p1, rep from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 8: *k5, p2, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2, p2,  rep from * to last 5 sts, k5.

Rows 9-56:  rep Rows 5-8.

Rows 57-59: rep Rows 5-7.

Finishing Rows

Row 60:  k37.

Row 61:  p37.

Row 62:  k37.

Row 63: p37.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

16 Comments

  • Looking at some of the past stitches in this series, I can see these knitting up as a wonderful sampler afghan. I am going to get started, so I can have a lovely afghan at the end of the year! This one looks great, and I can see myself making scarves, hats, shawls, and more out of it! Thank you!

  • Oh, that’s wonderful, Ruthie! Thank you so much for commenting and for taking part. I can’t wait to see your afghan! :D

  • Do you mean repeat twice or do the stitch pattern one more time? Just repeat?.Not repeat twice.
    I am confused

  • Hi, Ginny :)

    When you see sts placed inside brackets and then a number after…like twice…then it means to work those sts inside the brackets a total of 2 times. It might say after the brackets: 6 times, etc, but in this case it is only twice.

    Once those sts are worked the number of times listed, then you proceed to the next sts in the line of instructions for that row. Does that make better sense? :)

    Bethany~

  • Yes thanks

  • Row5 Main pattern row indicates 35 stitches
    On the break down after the k3 is there a P2 K2 (stitch row 21,22,23,24) then P2, K1.

  • Yes, you are correct, Ginny. :) The pattern has been corrected. Thank you…good eye!

  • Hi,when knitting flat,do I knit from right to left then left to right on the pattern,(row one right to left ,row two from left to right the third right to left and so on?thanks,jacki.

  • Hello Jacki :)

    The instructions say: Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs.

    The next row would be your beginning row, or Row 1, and would be knit in the opposite direction of the cast on…so right to left. And yes, you would alternate rows when working a flat panel…so for Row 2, you would turn and knit back across the row from left to right, and so on. :)

  • I used Red Heart yarn for this and it turned out 15 inches wide
    I have tried to block it
    To no avail
    How can I correct this.
    What did i do wrong
    I would try again but am afraid of the same poor result
    HELP
    PLEASE

  • Hi Ginny :)

    Well, first of all, in order to properly block something, you need to use yarns with a high natural fiber content. My own squares are knit with a wool or wool blend. Think of it like your own hair: you can get your hair to curl or straighten by using water or heat. This is the way blocking works for knitting. Acrylic just doesn’t have the same properties (it is essentially a plastic) to be able to re-mold itself into new shapes like natural hair/fiber. ;)

    But, even if you could block the square, 15″ probably couldn’t be blocked to 8″. Let’s look at some more ideas. .

    We need to look at what knit stitch you are using. I pretty much always use a U-stitch, which is in between the gauge of a regular knit stitch and a flat knit stitch. If you try to e-wrap, the stitches will come out way too loose.

    If you are using a U-stitch and are still getting a square that is too large, then either you need to knit with a snugger tension, or you will need to adjust the pattern to work with your own gauge. You can decrease the number of pattern repeat stitches that are in between the garter borders, based on the size you have ended up with, to equal something closer to the 8″.

    Also, another trick that I always do is to “snap” my stitches into place by pulling the knitting from top to bottom, vertically. When we work our stitches on the loom, they are at their most stretched out point. It helps to put them into their proper shape by giving them a gentle tug. ;)

  • Thank you
    I was wondering what is the loosest to the tightest knit stitch on the loom
    E wrap
    regular knit
    U wrap
    Flat knit

  • Yes, you have that correct. :) Here is a tutorial and comparison for you to refer to as well:
    http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/2543

  • Thanks a million

  • If I’m using 96 pegs, how do I continue the pattern after 37?

  • Hi Shirley :)

    Well, here is what the pattern says in the Notes:

    “For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.”

    So, in this case, you might not actually use the 37 count. This is just what I used for the square that includes border pegs and 2 repeats of the 16 stitch pattern. For 96 pegs, if you don’t have any border stitches, you could repeat the 16 pattern stitches 6 times. But if you want to fit in some border stitches, you could take out 1 or 2 of those 6 repeats to create a nice border on each side.

    If, on the other hand, you are wanting to use this stitch in the round, then you would simply work the 16 pattern stitches 6 times, and continue onto the following rows of the pattern, no border required.

    Does that make sense? :)
    Bethany~

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