Browsing articles in "Techniques (How-to)"
May 22, 2013

Ripping/Frogging

It is sad when we have to unravel a big chunk of our knitting. First, it means we made a mistake, second, it means that all that time we put into it is now wasted. But it is best to unravel it and do it all over than to keep going and have it bug you when you are wearing the item.

Today, we will tackle: Unraveling your knitting-get it done efficiently, without losing stitches or the entire project.

First, locate the row that is directly below the error.

Second, grab a piece of contrasting color yarn or a circular knitting needle that is about a size 3 or 4 and about 24 inches in length.

Here is the process:

Now that you have located the row, slide the contrasting color yarn/or needle into each of the V shaped stitches, passing it through one of the legs made by the V of the stitch.

Next, pop the stitches off the knitting loom and unravel the knitting. It will stop unraveling when you reach the contrasting color yarn/knitting needle.

Next, place each stitch that you have on the contrasting color yarn/knitting needle, back on the pegs. You should have the same amount of stitches as what you started off with.

Many knitters call the term of unraveling stitches FROGGING, as you “rip it, rip it, rip it” each of the stitches.

1 Comment

  • I am so excited about the new Loom and books! Congrats Pat!!!

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May 17, 2013

Basic BO and Elastic BO

Loomy Knowledge:

Basic Bind Off
Step 1: Knit peg 1.
Step 2: Knit peg 2.
Step 3: Move loop from peg 2 to peg 1. Lift the bottom loop off the peg.
Step 4: Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Peg 2 is now your new peg 1.
Repeat steps 1-4.

Elastic Bind off Method also known as the Yarn Over Bind Off
Done with e-wrap, not the knit stitch. The ewrap is what provides the extra yarn for the elasticity.

KO=Knit off, the process of lifting the bottommost loop up and off the peg.
Step 1: Ewrap peg 1 and KO.
Step 2: Ewrap peg 2 and KO.
Step 3: Move loop from peg 2 to peg 1. KO. Ewrap peg 1. KO.
Step 4: Move loop from peg 1 to empty peg 2. Peg 2 becomes peg 1.
Rep steps 1-4, until all the stitches have been removed from the loom.

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Mar 7, 2013

Crown Stitch

I love playing around with my knitting looms. I have had my eye on this specific stitch for awhile but I just couldn’t wrap my mind around it. I knew it was totally possible but didn’t know how to go about it. I sat down and after a Crown Sttich few failed attempts and much fighting with my knitting loom, I came out victorious! The knitting loom doesn’t know yet that I have a “no quit” policy, hahaha!

I present to you, the Crown Stitch. A lot of my friends are calling it the “broom stitch” from crochet. Since you already know that I know nothing about crochet, I’ll take your word for it ;).

Ready? Here is a playlist on how to do the Crown Stitch. It is two videos. The most important part is at the end of Video 1 and the entire Video 2.

Written Instructions

Crown stitch

(Multiple of 5 stitches)

Row 1: k
Row 2: p
Row 3: k
Row 4: p
Row 5: k1, *k1, ewrap peg 3 times; rep from * to the peg before last, k1
Row 6: *Work on 5 pegs at a time, drop the loops on the first 5 pegs ( peg 1 and last peg only have 1 loop on it). Elongate these wraps. Move all the wraps to peg 1, then from peg 1 to peg 2. Elongate the wraps over 4 pegs (from peg 2 to peg 5). You will now work and create 5 stitches on these elongated wraps as follows: k1, [p1, k1]twice; rep from * to the end.
Row 7: knit
Row 8: purl.

Rep these 8 rows.

Enjoy!!!

2 Comments

  • I like your knitting loom patterns and stitches, videos it makes it a fun experience
    to use the knitting looms.

  • Wonderingbifvanyone could explain the brioch stitch on a board. Please.

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Feb 27, 2013

Headband LAL-Complete mini-video playlist

Hey friends,

The entire playlist has been uploaded and is ready for you.  Enjoy!

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Feb 12, 2013

Headband Pattern Video LAL 1 and 2

Help to the rescue!!!

After 6 hours, the videos have finally finished uploading! Yay! We have two parts ready for you. Part 1 covers til row 8. Part 2 covers til row 12. These two parts have you covered for the increases portion of the headband. If you have any questions, comments, hit me up below in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them within 48 hours.

6 Comments

  • Are written instructions forthcoming?

  • I am so new I just received my loom today! But I am very confused. If you use the e cast on, can you go back a forth? Or do you always need to knit in the round? I have watched several videos for casting on, I favor the figure 8 cast on-but there isn’t any information as to what I would do after casting on, do I continue doing the figure 8 or the every other wrap. I was wondering if you could also recommend a good starter book. I am a very experienced knitter but my hands need a break. I also prefer to knit with fingering yarn, but trying it in my 28″ board gave me awful results.

    Thank you for your help
    Mindy

  • Linda, the written instructions are in the blog post below/previous to this one.

  • I am somehow missing the decreases??

  • I’m not getting the part 3 video, it plays 1 & 2 then skips to 4!

  • Isela I love your design but I am a little knew at this cut you possibly make a video to show us hit

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Sep 14, 2012

Mittens, thumbs, oh dear! Final part

How are you all my dear loomies! Almost done with those mittens? Ready to tackle the thumb!

Here goes nothing. You have at this point lovely mitten with a big hole on one side. You have two options, leave it as a hole or knit a little more and have a complete mitten, hopefully you will choose the latter.

If you are ready to start with your thumb, then lets get started :).

Thumb Instructions:

PU=pick up
WY=Working yarn

Set your loom to a 18 peg configuration.
PU 7 sts from the stitch holder and place them on the loom.
PU 2 sts from the side of the thumb hole, PU 7 sts from the mitten (the 7 pegs that you casted on, place those loops on the pegs), PU 2 sts from the other side of the thumb hole. 18 sts on the loom.

Rnd 1-14: Join WY to first peg. k to the end of rnd.
Optional (if you want to taper the end of the thumb, if not, skip this round): Rnd 16: k8, k2tog, k8, k2tog.
Rnd 17-18: k
GBO

Now, you may be asking yourself how did she get the yarn to match. If you are using self-striping yarn, you are going to have to unravel the yarn until you get to the same spot of dye color as in your first mitten, the thumb was pure luck that I ended up with the same type of color change as the body of the mitten–the stars were aligned.

Have fun knitting your mitts!!!

7 Comments

  • J’ adore…magnifique les travaillers.
    Je suis brasilienne, adorée travaille manualles.

  • Re: Mittens, thumbs, oh dear!
    Hello
    Do you have this pattern in a child’s size?? 5- 8 yrs.
    Thank you B.

  • LOVE it no sewing, Does this pattern come in child’s size 5- 8 yrs. and men’s?? Please add that too.

  • I found this to fit my grandsons 5, 6 yrs. for me I added 4 more sts. 36sts.

  • I need help. I have a great pattern (or so I thought) for my knitting board. It calls for a slip stitch a number of times and I can not figure out how do do one. I thought it was a form of decreasing, but when I apply that principle the pattern does not work!! Many thanks for any help

  • It simply means to skip the peg. Usually with the yarn towards the back of the peg.

  • will you post the pattern or how many pegs we need for different sizes of mitts to make

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Sep 11, 2012

Mittens, thumbs, oh dear!

Mittens and gloves are next in the list of my favorites, socks being the first ones. Mittens are just like socks, except you wear them on your hands :). They are small enough to carry around and yet you can use intricate designs on them to keep your mind excited.

Just like socks have the challenge of a heel, mittens and gloves have the challenge of a thumb! How do we create a thumb opening or the thumb for that matter. In the next two postings, I am going to show you how to create the opening for the thumb and then how to create the thumb for the mittens.

For our pattern, I used my basic mitten pattern.

Loom: AIO

Yarn: Knit Picks Chroma, worsted  (one of my favorite yarns!)

Notions: knitting tool, stitch holder, tapestry needle

Size: Adult women (small hands).

Abbreviations:

rnd=round

k=knit stitch or flat stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BO=Bind off

GBO=Gather Bind off

DIRECTIONS

CO 32 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1-14: *k2, p2; rep from * to the end of rnd.

Rnd 15-33: k to the end of rnd.

Rnd 34: Remove the first 7 sts to a stitch holder (see video). Cut yarn coming from the last peg, leaving a 6 inch yarn tail. Join yarn to peg 8. K from peg 8 to the end of rnd.

Rnd 35: With yarn coming from the last peg (peg 32),CO 7 sts ( e-wrap the first 7 pegs (see video)), k to the end of rnd.

Rnd 36-72: k to the end of rnd.

GBO.

THUMB DIRECTIONS

Check back later in the week for how to do the thumb :)

Check out the video on creating the thumb opening.

10 Comments

  • Thanks so much for all the videos, Isela. You rock!

  • Are these adult or child size?

  • Is this sock weight yarn or Chroma worsted weight?

  • Worsted weight.

  • Adult women, smallish hands, about 7.5 inches around the widest part of the hand.

  • Hello
    This is a fanastic pattern, no sewing seams etc.
    Would you please do the same pattern but in child’s size 5- 8 yrs.??
    and for men??. How many stitches do you allow for a child’s mitten? How many for men? Please email the amount needed or the patterns.
    Thank you B.

  • Re: Mittens, thumbs, oh dear!
    Hello
    Do you have this pattern in a child’s size?? 5- 8 yrs.
    Thank you B.

  • Re: Free Pattern: Mittens, thumbs, oh dear!
    Hello
    Did you do the whole mitten pattern in the Flat Stitch?? Thank you B.

  • I used the knit stitch. Flat stitch is too tight for me.

  • do you have a pattern using all different sizes and how may pegs we cast on

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Aug 21, 2012

Q & A: What does yarn weight mean?

Q: I am new to knitting and to the fiber arts in general. I don’t know how to read patterns and I am trying to get used to a lot of the terminology. I see yarn weight a lot. What does it mean?

A: In the simplest terms, yarn weight translates into yarn thickness, the circumference around the strand of yarn. There are about 6 yarn thicknesses currently in the market. The Craft Yarn Council of America has given them numbers from 1-6. At the lowest range, we have the thinnest yarn, at the opposite spectrum we have the thickest, at number 6.

How about if you don’t have the yarn weight called for in your pattern? No worries, you may be able to substitute with a different thickness of yarn. BUT, be sure to work a swatch and be sure to obtain the correct gauge.

Here is a quick substitution yarn guide:

2 strands of fingering=1 strand of sport weight yarn

2 strands of sports=1 strand of worsted

2 strands of worsted=1 strand of bulky

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Aug 20, 2012

Q & A: Number of pegs to use for a sock heel

We have gotten a few questions in the past few days. One of them has to do with socks and sock heel numbers.

How many stitches do I use on to create the heel of a 50 peg sock?

We first are going to divide the total number of pegs used by 1/2. 50/2=25

Second, from that 1/2, we are going to short-row until 1/3 of that number remains. The number is not exact, it can be rounded up or down. 25/3=8.33. I would short row, until there are 8 pegs wrapped at each side and then the center 9 are unworked. It should be 8 wrapped, 9 unwrapped, 8 wrapped.

General formula:

x=number of total pegs used in the sock

z=round up or down to obtain the wrapped number of pegs.

Proceed as follows:

x divided by 2=y

y divided by 1/3=z

3 Comments

  • I have just bought a sock loom and excitedly tried it out. It is now in the cupboard and I doubt I will be using it again. The stitches were tight and as I have arthritis? I had all sorts of problems getting the stitches off the pegs. The tool supplied was hard to manage and I was and am very dissapointed I wasted the money I paid for it. I have no trouble knitting gloves (with needles) and they are fiddly but socks have always eluded me. I followed the instructions again and again but my knitting was always the same. I envy you all who have one and can use it with ease. If anyone would like mine I will send it to you, it may get some use that way.
    Hln

  • I am right with you, Helen. Maybe 3 hours isn’t long enough to learn to cast on. I tried and tried and cried and cried. I couldn’t get past the part where you pull the stitches up after the first 6 or 7 it was just too tight and they wouldnt pull up. And I have searched this site and other to try to figure out what they are counting as cast on stitches since you go around with the “e stitch” twice and then pill up the stitch how many is that one per peg, 3 per peg. I can’t figure this out. maybe I am too stupid to knit and I will just stick to sewing

  • Oh dear ladies! The sock loom and sock yarns ARE slightly more difficult than other looms – I attribute it to the skinny metal pins and the bulky wood.

    You can knit socks on the blue Knifty Knitter loom! They will be thicker (though that could also be attributed to the fact I used Worsted Weight), so you’ll have more of a slipper sock, but you WILL have socks!

    Brienna – You wrap the yarn around 1 time, then go around again, so you have 2 wraps on every peg. Now you will pull the bottom loop over the top on each peg, so there’s only 1 again. Now you wrap the yarn around so there are 2 again, then repeat. You CAN make multiple wraps, which will make a tighter weave. In THAT case, you would pull the the bottom loop over the others, then the next one over, until there was 1 loop again.

    Perhaps, too, you are wrapping too tightly? I wish I could see what you are doing so I could offer better advice, but I hope what I said above makes some sense?

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Jul 20, 2012

Increases Mini-Series: Make 1 (M1)

M1=Make 1

Make 1 is an increase that is worked into the horizontal strand of yarn running between two stitches. There are two types of Make 1’s, a left twist  M1L and a right twist M1R. Some patterns do not specify which type of Make 1 to use, whenever the pattern doesn’t specify, it is safe to use the M1L.

M1L=Make 1 left. Twist the horizontal strand of yarn CLOCKWISE.

M1R=Make 1 right. Twist the horizontal strand of yarn COUNTERCLOCKWISE.

3 Comments

  • Isela,
    Thanks so much for doing the mini-series on increase. I know this will help a lot of the knitters, including myself. I know them all in needle knitting just wasn’t sure on the loom. Thanks again for all your wonderful help!!! Any new races coming up?

  • Using 50 pegs. How do I get 2/3rds out of the 25 for the heel/toe?

  • Hello,

    How do I M5 on same stitch? The stitch guide says M5 (make): (k1,YO, K1, YO, K1) in same st: 5 sts in one made.

    The pattern calls for the following.

    row 1: K1; *P5tog, M5 in next st; rep from * to last st, K1.

    This is really confusing. Please help me understand how to do this.

    Thanks,
    Melitza

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Jul 18, 2012

Increases Mini-Series: knit 1 front and back (k1f&b)

Knit 1 front and back (k1f&b)

It is one of the most commonly used increases. It is a visible increase as it creates a horizontal bar wherever you create the increase.  Also known as the bar increase because of the horizontal bar it creates.  To create this increase, you will need an empty peg to the right of the peg where you want the increase. Name the pegs as follows: Peg A (peg with loop on it) and Peg B (empty peg).

Step 1: Knit the stitch as usual on Peg A. Instead of popping the loop off the peg as you normally would when creating a knit stitch, place the newly formed loop on the adjacent empty peg (Peg B), leaving the original loop on Peg A and the new loop on Peg B.

Step 2: Wrap Peg A counterclockwise. Lift the bottom loop off the peg, leaving one loop on the peg.

Continue working the row.

Here is a visual for your convenience.

2 Comments

  • Hi Isela,

    Could you tell me, on what type of project would this be used ? What purpose does this have? thx
    Congrats on joining the Knitting Board site.! :)

  • I have looked at looms and plan on purchasing one this weekend,is it as easy as you make it seem? I knitted years ago when in school,but that is all,I needle tatt and sew and always looking at new ways to make items.I have MS and want to keep going by making beautiful items as a type of therapy,any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

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Jul 11, 2012

Felted Slippers Q&A

Question: How do you do the k2tog?

Answer:

There are various ways that you can do this, my preferred method and in my  head the easiest.

Step 1: Take all the stitches off the loom and transfer them to a piece of scrap yarn.

Step 2: Put the loops back on the pegs as follows: 2 loops per peg, except for in the second decrease, you will have the last peg with only 1 loop.

Now, go ahead and knit the pegs.

Hope this helps.

 

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Jul 6, 2012

Increases Mini-Series: Yarn Over (YO)

Yarn Over, abbreviated as YO. In needle knit patterns, it can also be referred as yarn around needle (YRN), yarn forward (YF), and wool around/over needle  (YON). This type of increase creates a small hole in the knitting, within the row where you create the increase.

To create the YO, simply e-wrap the peg counterclockwise.

Working with YOs: When a pattern calls for a YO within the knitted fabric, we are going to need to move the stitches outwards to create an empty peg where we want the YO located. In the video shown, I demonstrate how to increase within the fabric. There are two methods: First method: move the stitches out to create the empty space then knit the stitches and e-wrap the empty peg. Second method and my preferred method when only increasing one stitch is to knit the stitches and move them to their new peg after I have knitted them (as shown in the video). When the pattern calls for a YO at the beginning of a row, it is quite simple, just e-wrap the next adjacent empty peg to the first/last peg of the fabric.

 

3 Comments

  • Hello,
    I am going to try making making my first pair of socks on the sock loom. I would appreciate help with understanding “Join to form a round”. Do I connect the stitches on the pegs with a special stitch or how do I do so? Thank you for help from a new loom knitter.

  • Marilyn, you connect them in various forms, the easiest method is to simply interchange the loop from the last peg with the loop from the first peg.

  • To join in the round is a simple way to say that we will be knitting around the knitting loom and not a flat panel. One easy way to join in the round is to take the yarn coming from the last peg to the front of the first peg and continue wrapping the loom around and around. Another method is to interchange the last loop on the last peg with the loop from the first peg. Hope this helps.

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Jun 19, 2012

Mini-Series on Increases:

In the next couple of weeks, we are going to learn some new increases and how to create them on our knitting looms. We will be tackling the following: YO, M1, M1L, M1R, LLI, RLI, K1F&B, P1F&B, KRB.

Inc: Increase–what is it? It is a way to add stitches to your knitting either on a row or in the round. While adding stitches on a row in simple, adding stitches in the round is a little bit more tricky for us loom knitters are most of our looms have a set peg number and we cannot “add” pegs to our loom. However, with our AllnOne loom, we can add in the round! Yay for us!

Swing by later this week and we will go over a YO and how to create it on our loom.

 

4 Comments

  • Can’t wait to see it!

  • So looking forward to this–I try to ignore patterns that make be do anything other than the basics so will enjoy learning more about increasing.

  • It’s great you are sharing and increasing our knowledge base. Just a suggestion, it would be most helpful if the mini series were compiled in one place for easy and permanent reference.
    Thank you for making me a better loomer.

  • I will try to put a link on the side bar to this knowledge base. Thank you for the feedback.

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May 29, 2012

LAL: Sole & Toe

Hi friends,

Hope you all had a wonderful holiday weekend. I guess, we are all coming along well with the sock. I didn’t receive any questions in respect to the heel, if any of you are stuck, please leave me a comment and I will do my best to help you.

This week, we are going to finish our sock. The Sole is straight stockinette (knit all the rounds) and you do this until the sole measures approximately, 2 inches less than desired length for the foot.

Once we have knitted the sole of the sock, we will repeat the instructions that we did for the HEEL portion one more time to create the extra fabric for the toe section.

Let’s get to that point and then we will continue to the very last portion where we seam the toe close using the KITCHENER STITCH.

6 Comments

  • I finished the second sock today. Hurray! They were really fun to make and fit very well. Thanks for the knit a long.

  • I finished my first sock. Way to tight in the heel. What did I do wrong?

  • Hello, I have great hope for assistance with a question and my two new looms (AllnOne and the sock loom). I am having a difficult time understanding the cable-cast-on method, can someone suggest a good resourse for me to use? The pattern book I have suggest using this method lots, but I am having a difficult time following the written info and pictures in the book. Also, can someone please explain “Join to form a round” when working on a loom? Does this mean I do a special stitch between the pegs to connect them? Thank you for help.

  • I am trying to make ruffle scarf on long loom I am having problem with yarn being too tight when transferring to other side. What should I do differently. Is it the lack of stretch in yarn. I am using red heart sashay.

  • Can you please go over or repost finishing the sock with the kitchener stitch? Thank you!

  • I will look for it and repost it. Thank you.

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May 21, 2012

LAL: Heel

How is everyone’s socks coming along? At this point, you should have completed the leg portion of the sock. Next up is the heel. The heel is formed by working short-rows. Short rowing is a knitting technique that adds extra room by creating extra fabric in one area. Short rowing involves knitting to a certain point in your knitting and then turning back in the other direction, leaving some stitches at the end of the row unworked–thus the term “short”. Turning in the opposite direction will leave a small hole in the knitting, to avoid this hole, we “wrap” the peg and then “turn” in the apposite direction.

To work the heel, you will be working on half the stitches that you used for your sock. Locate the number of stitches on your sock, then use the number indicated for the heel.

Heel instructions as written for the pattern (I have included some starting instructions in parenthesis for those who are working on more pegs than indicated in the pattern):

HEEL

The heel is worked in short rows to create the extra fabric to accommodate the heel.

*Tip: Place stitch marker on peg 1 and peg 20 (or the last peg where you need to knit your sock).

Knit from peg 1 to peg 19 (or to 1 peg before reaching the last stitch marker). Wrap & Turn on peg 20 (on last peg).

Knit from peg 18 to peg 2. Wrap & Turn on peg 1.

Knit from peg 2 to peg 18 (or to two pegs before the last stitch marker). Wrap & Turn on peg 19 (on second to last peg).

Knit from peg 18 to peg 3. Wrap & Turn on peg 2.

Knit from peg 3 to peg 17. Wrap & Turn on peg 18.

Knit from peg 17 to peg 4. Wrap & Turn on peg 3.

Knit from peg 4 to peg 16. Wrap & Turn on peg 17.

Knit from peg 16 to peg 5. Wrap & Turn on peg 4.

Knit from peg 5 to peg 15. Wrap & Turn on peg 16.

Knit from peg 15 to peg 6. Wrap & Turn on peg 5.

Knit from peg 6 to peg 14. Wrap & Turn on peg 15.

Knit from peg 14 to peg 7. Wrap & Turn on peg 6.

(There will be 6 pegs at each side with wraps and 8 pegs in the center without wraps).

Knit from peg 7 to peg 15. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 16.

Knit from peg 15 to peg 6. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 5.

Knit from peg 6 to peg 16. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 17.

Knit from peg 16 to peg 5. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 4.

Knit from peg 5 to peg 17. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 18.

Knit from peg 17 to peg 4. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 3.

Knit from peg 4 to peg 18. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 19.

Knit from peg 18 to peg 3. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 2.

Knit from peg 3 to peg 19. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 20.

Knit from peg 19 to peg 2. (When knitting the peg with wrap(s) on it, pick up the wrap(s) and the loop, treating them all as one loop). Wrap & Turn peg 1.*

Heel completed, continue with the rest of the instructions, working in the round from this point forward (Pegs 1 and 20 have wraps on them, treat the wraps and the loop on the peg as one loop).

Let me know if you have any questions, concerns and I’ll come answer the questions this evening and tomorrow. Let’s get the heel done this week and next week we will tackle the sole.

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May 8, 2012

Double Woven Socks LAL: Leg portion

Let’s go ahead and start on the leg portion of the pattern.

Rnd 11: *SKYF2, k2; rep from * to the end of rnd.

Rnd 12: k to the end of rnd.

Rnd 13: *k2, SKYF2; rep from * to the end of rnd.

Rnd 14: k to the end of rnd.

 

 

Repeat Rnds 11-14 until sock leg measures 6 inches or desired length.

A few concerns on Round 11 and 12.

Round 11 is all a matter of skipping two pegs with the yarn in front of the peg and then knitting the next two pegs.

Round 12 is where the tricky part comes in. You need to knit all the pegs, but you have to place the strand that is front of the peg towards the back of the peg but in front of the right side of the fabric.

I prepared a small video showing how to do this on the knitting loom.

Let me know if this helps a bit on how to do this section of the sock.

Also, here is a playlist of mini-videos to help you with this pattern.

7 Comments

  • Thanks. The video was very helpful

  • Thanks for the video – very helpful!

  • Can you tell me how many stitches to wrap for my sock using 52 pegs? Thanks

  • I finished the first sock and started the second one.

  • Mary, I would wrap 44 pegs.

  • Mary, you are a knitting sock rockstar!

  • I’ve been so busy I am still to finish the leg on the first sock.

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May 6, 2012

LAL-Getting started

Alright, I think we got the numbers of pegs ironed out and we are ready to get this started! Yay!

Let me just quickly write down some numbers here for you, in case you didn’t see my comments in the comments section.

So let’s get ready to cast on our knitting loom, shall we! For the first part of the LAL, let’s do the first 10 rows.

Cast on INSERT NUMBER OF PEGS NECESSARY FOR YOUR FOOT, join to work in the round.

Rnds 1-4:k to the end of rnd.

Rnd 5: *yo, k2tog; rep from *  to the end of rnd.

Rnds 6-9: k to the end of rnd.

Rnd 10: Pick up cast on edge and place the loops back on the peg as if creating a brim. K to the end of rnd.

How to do round 5?

Move the loop from every odd number peg to the neighbor peg, loop from peg 1 to peg 2, loop from peg 3 to peg 4, loop from peg 5 to peg 6…to the end.

Then, you will e-wrap peg 1, knit peg 2, treating both loops on peg 2 as one loop. Continue in this form til the end of the round.

How to do round 10?

Find the cast on round (it is the first round you put on the loom), locate the first loop (it is right by the yarn tail), place that loop back up onto peg 1. Grab the next loop to it, place it onto peg 2, continue around until you have picked every loop from the cast on edge and it is sitting back on the loom. Each peg should have 2 loops on it. Knit the round.

Let’s get to this point and on Monday, we shall begin the leg portion of the sock.

Questions, concerns, just hit me in the comments below and I’ll answer in the comments for you.

Have a great weekend!

18 Comments

  • I didn’t see the comments. I’ll c o 36 sts from your chart, but I got 50 sts from measuring my foot. I don’t want to get behind. Jackie

  • I’ve done my 10 rows on 36 sts. It looks small to me. I got 11sts 15 rows =2 “. My foot is 8.5” first I got 50 pegs and now go 46. I don’t want to go any further until I’m sure of how many cast ons I need. Jackie

  • Jackie – 8.5 x (11/2) x 0.9 = 42.075
    You need to round this to the nearest multiple of 4 (40 or 44) for this pattern. I would round it down to 40 sts. I have the same stitch gauge as you, but a 9 1/4 foot measurement. I rounded down to 44 sts for my foot size. Hope this helps!

  • Thanks Sharon. I’m going to start over. I don’t want to have socks I can’t wear. I appreciate your help. Jackie

  • When you wrap every peg on rnd. 6, it will have 3on every other one and 1 on the others. How can you knit every st? I’m confused Sorry

  • Went back and re-read the pattern. All straightened out. Have my 10 rows done. My only excuse is my age. I’m 80 and get confused sometimes

  • Do you have a recommendation for the best cast on for a sock?

  • You need a flexible cast on for socks, I would recommend the cable cast on or the ewrap cast on.

  • Isela–
    Would it be possible for you to make a video of your knit stitch (skyf2) used in this pattern? I’m still not getting it right….drats!

    Thanks!! It’s so nice of you to share this lovely pattern with us!

  • Just found your video and watched it. Thanks. Will continue with my sock now.

  • Isela,

    I have a question about the loom you use in your book: LOOM KNITTING SOCKS. I bought a set of round looms at my local Walmart that are made by Boye. Are they the same gauge as the KK that you use in your book? I know they are a larger gauge then the AKB sock loom, that i’m currently using to knit socks with. I was just wondering if they could be used to make the socks in your book.

    Thank you,
    Maxine

  • I am finding that my knit stitch is coming out very uneven. I was wondering about trying a flat stitch instead. Are there any benefits of one over the other?

  • I finished the first sock and it fits pretty well. Now to make the other one.

  • The flat stitch will work, just make sure that you don’t knit too tightly. ;)

  • Maxine,
    I don’t think they are the same gauge. The looms I used in that book are finer in gauge, those are considered extra fine gauge, the KB sock loom is a fine gauge loom. You can use the KB loom but you will need to adapt to the gauge given on the KB sock loom.

  • Thank you Isela. Guess i didn’t read the part about which looms you used in making the socks. Looking at the photos, i thought you used the round ones, but further reading, i saw which ones you used.

  • have just got sock knitting loom from authentic knitting and finding it sooo different from kk looms.cant seem to get a loose enough stitch to hook over,any help will be great.thanks

  • Chris,
    Practice, practice, practice. The more you use the loom, the easier it will get and the stitches will become less tight as you get more comfortable with the loom.

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May 3, 2012

Socks Loom-a-Long: Swatch

Hi everyone,

I hope I have given you enough time to knit up that swatch and get things rolling a little more. At this point, you should have completed the swatch and measured it. So far we have the following numbers:

11 sts x 16 rows = 2 inches

9.5 sts x 21 rows = 2 inches

Anyone else?

Next step: please measure around the ball of the foot of the person who you are going to be knitting the sock. Check out this link on how to measure your feet, you want to do #4 on the list.

Once we have the gauge and the measurement around the ball of the foot, we can more accurately calculate how many stitches to cast on.

For example: my foot measures 8.5 inches around and I got a gauge of 9.5 sts=2 inches. You can do the math two ways: Divide 8.5 inches (measurement around the ball of the foot) by 2=4.25 x 9.5 (multiply that by the stitches per in, 9.5)=40.375

Or

Divide the stitches in the 2 inches by 1. 9.5/2=4.75  then multiply that number by the measurement around the ball of the foot. 4.75 x 8.5=40.375

Socks are knitted at a negative ease so they fit snugly around the foot, the negative ease that we typically use for socks is around 10%. From the number we arrived at, 40.375 for my foot, we are going to decrease 10%. I round up or down so I am left with a multiple of 4 of the necessary multiple for the sock pattern.  In this case, I am rounding down to 36 pegs.

Okay my dears, now it is your turn. You have your gauge, now measure your foot and see if you can calculate the number of pegs needed for your socks. If you can’t, no worries, post in the comments the following: Gauge, measurement of the ball of the foot at widest point and then say HELP ;).

I will come by tomorrow, Thursday to get us going in the right direction with the number of pegs to use for our sock.

52 Comments

  • I would go to 48 pegs. It is closer to 48 than 44.

  • ok I know this is not what everyone is talking about but PLEASE HELP !!!!!! in doing the dangbury hooded can anyone tell me what a circular means im using a loom and im stuck, im on the front of sweater button side
    ty

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May 2, 2012

Q & A: Twisting Yarns

Q & A:

Deanna asks: I’m using doubled yarn to make an afghan for a child. ( I’m a beginner ) . The yarn gets so twisted – HELP! How do you prevent this ?

Deanna,

We all at one point or another have had to use two yarns as one and unfortunately we have all probably been found like a cat tangled amidst yards of yarn. I have done it so many times that I distinctly remember one day being so tangled up that I just cut the yarns and threw the big knot in the garbage, hahaha, I guess I lost my patience there for a bit.

Two methods I have found to be successful:

1. Wind each skein into a center pull ball then, keep one yarn to my left and one yarn to my right. I get two boxes, or two bags and I set each one by my right foot or left foot. I pull both them at the same time and have a small “pool” of yarn on my lap ready to be worked. Once I finished the “pool” of yarn, I go ahead and pull a little more onto my lap.

2. Wind the two separate skeins into one single skein. Both of them will be together and ready to be knitted.

I hope this helps a bit. Do any of our readers have any other suggestions?

Here kitty kitty

 

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