Browsing articles in "Techniques (How-to)"
Apr 30, 2017

Whirly Bookmark

Sometimes quick and simple make the best gifts.  Bookmarks are a gift that most anyone can use.  Pretty yarn and very little time can make a stunning Whirly Bookmark making it great for end of the year teachers’ gifts as well as gifts for any holiday or birthday.

 

LOOM:  Sock Loom EFG

YARN: 2 yds of 2 weight yarn.   Lion Brand Bonbons in Celebrate used in sample.

NOTIONS:  knitting tool, tapestry needle

GAUGE:  n/a

SIZE:  Approximately 12” in length

ABBREVIATIONS

CO=Cast on

Rep=repeat

K=knit

INSTRUCTIONS

Curlicue Instructions

Step 1:  e-wrap K peg 1, 4 times

Step 2:  figure 8 wrap (see 2 Peg I-Cord Instructions) both pegs and K over, one time

Rep steps 1 & 2 until the curlicue is the length stated in the pattern.  Curls may need to be worked into place by hand.

2 Peg I-Cord Instructions

Step 1:  Wrap both pegs in a figure 8 by bringing the working yarn behind peg 1, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2, then behind peg 2, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2.  K over.

Rep step 1 until the i-cord is the length stated in the pattern.

Bookmark

Using 2 strands of yarn held together as one, CO 2 pegs by placing the slip knot on peg 1 and wrapping peg 2   Wrap both pegs in a figure 8 by bringing the working yarn behind peg 1, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2, then behind peg 2, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2.  Knit over.

Step 1:  Work Curlicue Instructions (above) until the work curls and is about 1” long.

Step 2:  Work a 2 peg i-cord until the work is approx. 10” from the end.

Note:  If a shorter or longer bookmark is desired, knit the i-cord to the desired length before the next step.

Step 3:  Work Curlicue Instructions until the work curls and is about 12” from the end (top curl should be only 2” long).

BO by moving the stitch on peg 1 to peg 2, lift bottom loop over top, cut the working yarn leaving a tail to weave in, pull the tail through the final loop.

Weave in ends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Apr 18, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Price My Work To Sell?

 

 

 

 

 

Lots of people who love any of the fiber arts end up wanting to sell their work.  Sometimes it is because they run out of people to make things for as gifts.  Or because they have a friend that has asked them to make something in particular.  Or sometimes it’s a simple matter of making money to help pay the bills.

This always leads to questions.  How do I price my work?  Am I asking too much because people seemed surprised when I mention the price?  Why am I not selling anything when my prices are low?

While there is nothing really set in stone on how to price handmade items, let’s discuss various ways to go about finding that right price for your items.

What It’s Worth VS. What People Will Pay

When pricing handmade items made of yarn, the first most obvious way is to keep up with the number of hours spent working on the item, multiplying that by an hourly wage, then adding cost of materials used.

Problem with that is even when using minimum wage, the price most likely will be more than most people are willing to pay or can even afford to pay.  This doesn’t mean that you don’t deserve that price for the items.  We all deserve to be paid more for our work than we can ever sell them for.

So what should I do?

Using The Cost of Supplies As a Guide

Another way to calculate price is to take the cost of yarn used for the project and multiple that by 2 or 3.

This method is used most often.  I like to multiply the cost of yarn by 3 because I do not want to undersell myself.  If the item is very time consuming due to it being a complex pattern, I will always add $10 to $50 depending on the size of the item and how long it took to complete.

But that seems too high to ask.

Most people do tend to under price their items.  They think that people will not pay a higher price for their work.

Let me just say this.  Never underestimate the value of your work.

Some people will not buy an item if they think it’s too cheap.  They may think you use inferior yarn.  Or that there is something wrong with it.

But people complain about it being too high, and they are able to buy it at a store cheaper.

There is always people who will complain about the price.  If they think they can get the same exact item with the same exact quality for less at a store, I can guarantee they will be in for a huge surprise.  Machine or sweat shop made items are not high quality.  They will not hold up to time and wear.

In other words, they will get what they pay for.

But I bought my yarn on sale.  Do I use that price?

If you buy your yarn on sale, I would recommend not using that price, but the regular price the yarn retails for.  That way if you need to make the same item again with the same yarn but need to buy more, your price will already cover the yarn not being on sale at that time.

Compare Prices

If you are still unsure of what to charge for something, look on the selling sites for similar items and see what those are selling for.  Then you can price your items accordingly.

Geographic Area Dictates Price As Well

Don’t forget that items that sell for higher prices in places that are known for artists and tourism will not sell for as much in small towns and lower populated areas.  Also places where the income is lower will need to have lower prices on handmade items than in places where income is higher.

Therefore you should always take into consideration where you live, who you are selling to, and how much people can pay for handmade, unique items.

So how much should I charge?

When considering how much to charge for something, it really all comes down to 3 things:  location, price of supplies, and personal consideration.  Each person values their time and effort differently.  Therefore, it is a personal preference as to how much each item is worth when selling it.

Is it too high?  Is it priced too low??

Only you can be the judge of that.  Just because it doesn’t sell at a certain price does not mean it’s priced too high.  Only that the right person hasn’t seen it yet to buy it at that price.

Remember This

There will always be people who will complain about the price.  ALWAYS.  And there will always be people who will offer you a lower price.  Therefore it is better to price your items on the high side so you do have room to for those that offer less.

And if they still complain about the price being too high, here’s a suggestion on how to deal with them.  Already know how much the price for that same item is when using the hourly wage price calculation.  Then explain to them that if you were wanting to get paid a hourly rate for your work like they get paid at their job (tell them what that per hour rate is and how long it took to make the item along with cost of materials) that the price would be this amount instead (tell them the higher price) and that you are wanting to give them a price cut to begin with.

Most people really have no clue how long it takes to make these things.  While putting it into perspective for them may not cause them to pay the price you are asking, at least then they will now be enlightened.  Or not.  Some people can never be enlightened…

Just remember to not be rude.  State the facts in a matter of fact manner.  And always with a smile.  If you keep on smiling to rude people, it makes them feel uncomfortable.  I love doing that…

NEVER UNDER ESTIMATE THE VALUE OF YOUR WORK!!  Whatever you do, do NOT price your items too low.  Your time and effort is always worth more than you can ever earn for a certain piece.  Just consider it a gift to mankind at whatever price you sell it for because you will always deserve more than you earn.

After all, it is art.  Always.  ART.  No matter if it’s a hat, scarf, or blanket.  And whoever buys it will treasure it for what it is.  ART.  Love is put in every piece.  If even made just for selling, you love the craft, or you wouldn’t do it.  Not like you are working in a sweat shop with no option otherwise.

In short, again, YOU ARE WORTH IT.  Price your work accordingly.  Is it correct?  Yes.  If you are comfortable with the price, then it is correct.  Even then, it’s probably too low.  But as long as you are happy with what you are paid, then it’s worth it.  Don’t let others tell you otherwise.

And as a side note…  If you are taking a commission to make something for someone, please get at least half if not all the money up front.  That way you will not be out any money if they change their mind.  And NEVER give them the item until full payment is made.  I have seen so many lose money by trusting people to pay them after they receive the item.  Unfortunately, friendships have ended over this very thing.  Just be careful and get paid up front.

Keep on loom knitting those lovely projects whether they are for yourself, for loved ones as gifts, or for sell no matter what the reason.  YOU ARE WORTH EVERY PENNY!!!

2 Comments

  • I don’t know how you know what many of us are thinking. ? I have been wrestling with this question for a while myself. Thank you for your input. But, you didn’t offer any suggestions where.

  • Unfortunately this article was not about where to sell things. Only about pricing items. I am not in a position to endorse any website and other place to sell handmade items on this blog. Thank you for reading!

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Apr 15, 2017

Twisted Pearl Stitch (double knit)

Knitting in double knit with Rib stitches can create so many varieties, but each one is a new stitch to use in many applications.  Rib creates a very stretchy knit that retains its shape.

stitch_taupe

 

With the Twisted Pearl Stitch, the back of this stitch looks just the same so it is a good one for showing both sides.

Very pretty and similar to our traditional Rib, but you will find  that the ribs are tighter in this stitch, and the same on both sides.

The background weave shows an angle strand when the rib is opened. (See up close insert.)  Be sure to work with an even number of stitches.

 

twisted_purl_graph

 

 

 

 

 

0         1          2         3           4         5         6         7           8         9          10       11       12

Loom:  10” knitting loom or any loom with 22 + pegs with a width of 1 cm between rows of pegs.

Yarn:  Any #4 worsted weight yarn in wool, acrylic or blend. Sample square is knit with Lion Brand Heartland.

Abbreviations:  L=left, R=right

close up twisted

Close up detail of this stitch with color background.   

Instructions:

Cast On 22 stitches in pattern working L to R with at least (1) open peg to L of slip knot.

(Option would be to cast on with stockinette, lay anchor yarn, and wrap in pattern for row #1)

So, let’s see how it looks on the loom:  We are creating a square that is approximately 10″ X 10″ just to learn the new stitch.  When complete, makes a great wash cloth.

 

Step 1:  Start with a slip knot on peg 2 top.twisted_purl1

Step 2:  Wrap straight down around peg 2 bottom.

Step 3:  Bring yarn back to peg 1 and wrap around top peg from inside to outside and straight down around bottom peg #1.

Step 4:  Bring yarn from bottom peg 1 to top peg 4, wrap around top of peg and down to bottom peg 4 and wrap.

Step 5:  Go back to peg 3 top wrapping to L and down around the bottom peg.

Step 6:  You will see that the repeat is to skip a peg, wrap the next peg, top to bottom pegs straight down, and then go back to skipped peg and wrap the pegs around top, going straight down to bottom peg. Then repeat skipping the next stitch.

Step 7:  Work in this manner across the 22 pegs. Lay a piece of anchor yarn.

Turn the loom around, so that you are again working from L to R. This shows the return over the anchor yarn.

twisted_purl2

Move yarn to 2nd stitch and repeat the process starting with step 3.

Continue working this row for the design.

Stitches ready to hook over.

 

Row is complete

Row is complete.

 

 

 

 

 

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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Apr 3, 2017

Slip Stitch Braid: Stitchology 31

This lovely stitch is perfect for spring knitting.  It contains pretty braids that almost look woven in appearance.  This technique is created by using slipped stitches combined with 1 over 2 cables.  Don’t let those cables cause you any dismay, because they are super simple to work with the help of that elongated slipped stitch.  Repeated throughout a project, this stitch makes me think of baby knits, socks, or even a lovely hat (anything that the back isn’t going to necessarily be a feature).  Change the color every two rows and the look goes from delicate to Wow!

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

 

Special Stitch Instructions

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 5—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

**The stitch pattern does call for e-wrapping particular stitches. Wrap them, but do not knit them off until it is time to work these e-wraps into a row.  When it is time, knit off the stitch and then make sure to untwist the loop before working.

The cables in this pattern involve trading the loops of 3 pegs in the correct order. They consist of a 1 over 2 Right Cross [1/2RC] (a cable with the sts running to the right), and a 1 over 2 Left Cross [1/2LC] (a twist with the sts running to the left).  They are worked as follows:

[1/2RC]:  Worked over 3 pegs: Lift the 2 loops from the pegs on the right and place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the left and move it to the farthest peg on the right.  Place the 2 held loops onto the 2 pegs on the left.  With the working yarn, knit the 3 pegs.

[1/2LC]:  Worked over 3 pegs: Lift the 2 loops from the pegs on the left and place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the right and move it to the farthest peg on the left.  Place the 2 held loops onto the 2 pegs on the right.  With the working yarn, knit the 3 pegs.

*An easy way to remember which direction to go is to remember to hold the stitches onto a cable needle on the side of the directional slant.  So…for a right cable, hold the loops on the right.  For a left cable, hold the loops on the left.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

Slip Stitch Braid, Repeating Pattern

Slip Stitch Braid, Repeating Pattern with Color Stripes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The squares in the chart that are bordered with a pink square are the repeating pattern rows.  The squares outside the pink border are set-up rows to be worked only once, before the repeating rows. The chart on the right shows where to change colors, if an alternating color stitch is desired. 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rows

Row 1:  k all sts.

Row 2:  *EW1, k4, rep from * to end.

Row 3:  *k4, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 4: *S1, k2, EW1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 5: *k1, S1, 1/2RC, rep from * to end.

Row 6:  *EW1, k2, S1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 7:   *k1, 1/2LC, S1.

Repeat Rows 4-7 until desired length.

**Note:  When finishing the stitch pattern, omit the EW in the 2nd to last row and the S1 in the final row. 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rounds

Round 1:  k all sts.

Round 2:  *k4, EW1, rep from * to end.

Round 3: *k4, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rounds

Round 4: *k1, Ew1, k2, S1, rep from * to end.

Round 5: *k1, S1, 1/2RC, rep from * to end.

Round 6: *k1, S1, k2, EW1, rep from * to end.

Round 7:   *k1, 1/2LC, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rounds 4-7 until desired length.

**Note:  When finishing the stitch pattern, omit the EW in the 2nd to last round and the S1 in the final round. 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

  • Which cast on method would you use for this pattern?

  • Hi Margo :)

    You can use whichever cast on you prefer. My personal favorite and the one that I pretty much use every time is the Chain Cast On. I like this one because I feel it most closely matches the Basic Bind Off, which is my go-to bind off method. ;)
    Bethany~

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Mar 20, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Work A Different Color Border?

 

 

 

 

 

Lately I have been looking at a lot of different yarn for various projects.  But it can be overwhelming.  Which is one reason I love self-striping yarn.  I can make a hat or scarf with self-striping yarn and let the yarn work it’s own magic without the hassle of changing colors.

But sometimes, colorwork is desired.  While there are various methods of colorwork in loom knitting, one of the questions I have seen is How do I made the border of my afghan a different color from the middle?  Well you are in luck!  Making a flat panel with a different color border is not as hard as it sounds whether it be a scarf, afghan, dish cloth, or other flat panel.  And even better, there are not a lot of ends to weave in either if it’s done correctly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s get started!

What stitch pattern should I use?

The stitch pattern used for the border and body can be whatever you wish.

If you don’t want the edges to curl, you do need to use a stitch pattern for the border that is a combination of knits and purls.  The body or middle of the flat panel can be all knits or stockinette or any other stitch pattern.

You can even work the entire piece in one stitch pattern and just change the colors to create a border effect.

For more information on why the edges curl, please check out Loom FAQs:  Why Do Knits Curl?

If you would like more information on the 3 simplest and most common knit/purl combinations that do not curl, please check out Loom FAQs:  Is It Garter, Rib, or Seed Stitch?

But I don’t want to weave in a lot of ends or have to join the yarn ends!!

Oh I feel you!  I absolutely despise weaving in ends, detest knots, and don’t like the floats or carried strands of yarn across the back of the work.

But you do not need to do any of those in order to create a border in a different color except for having a few extra ends to weave in.

But is it hard?

It is not hard at all to work the border in a different color.  But you will need to work with 3 strands of yarn after finishing the bottom border.

Why do I need to work with 3 strands of yarn?

First let’s start our sample piece, then discuss why 3 strands are needed.

Bottom Border

 

For our sample today, I will be working the border in garter with the grey yarn.

 

 

 

 

Then I will be adding the pink for the body in stockinette or all knits while working both side borders with the grey in garter before finishing the top border with grey in garter.  This way the middle will be pink and completely surrounded by grey.

 

 

I will NOT be slipping the first stitch on each row.  If you would like to create a nice chain border, you can learn more about slipping stitches in Loom FAQs:  To Slip or Not To Slip?  That is the Frequently Asked Question.

Here I have started my bottom border with the grey yarn on the Sock Loom 2 over 22 pegs and worked 8 rows (4 ridges) in garter stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

Side Borders and Body

Now I will work the right border over 3 pegs.  Since I am working the border in garter, this row will be knit.

 

 

 

 

 

Join the yarn for the body which is pink for us here.   Leave the grey working yarn without cutting it.  We will pick it back up later.

How do I join the new color of yarn?

Some like to put the slip knot on the first peg of the new color.  I prefer to just start my new color as follows:

Simply work the first stitch in pink like normal leaving a tail to weave in later.  There really is not a need for a slip knot at all even on an anchor peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Won’t it leave a hole in that spot?

It will leave a hole if left alone, but you will close the hole when you weave in the end.  More information on weaving in ends can be found in Loom FAQs:  Why Not Knots?

For our sample, the body in the pink yarn will be 16 stitches.  I will be working every row of the pink yarn in all knits.  When the 16 stitches are complete, drop the pink yarn and join the second grey yarn.

 

 

 

 

 

Where do I get the second strand of grey?

If you are brave, you can pull 2 strands from one skein of yarn.  One side border from the middle of the skein and the other side border from the outside.

Otherwise you will need 2 skeins of grey or whatever color you are using for your border.

If making an afghan, you will be using more than one skein for the border anyway so I would recommend using 2 skeins from the start.

 

Join the second strand of border yarn in the same manner as before when starting the body color.

 

 

 

 

 

Knit the last 3 stitches.

 

 

 

 

Now for the return row.  This is where we will start connecting the border and body yarns together as we pick up the next color.

Since we are working the border in garter (still), purl the first 3 pegs on the return row with the grey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now we will connect the grey with the pink by twisting the 2 yarns around each other.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The easiest way is the bring the yarn you are picking up (the pink) around the back the yarn you are dropping (the grey)

 

 

 

 

 

so that they make a U, hooking them together.

 

 

 

 

 

Knit with the body color back across.  Which for us is 16 stitches to the other border.

 

 

 

 

We will now connect the pink with the grey from the other side in the same manner as before by bringing the yarn we are picking up (the grey) behind the yarn we are going to drop (the pink)

 

 

 

making that same U to connect them.  Then purl the last 3 pegs.

 

 

 

 

 

When twisting the 2 strands of yarn together, take care to make sure the twist does not slide to one side or the other.  Keep your tension with the twist even so the twist is right between the pegs.  Or you will get this at your join.  You can see here where I was not careful to keep my twist centered between the stitches.

 

 

Then we repeat our last 2 rows connecting the yarns as we going on EVERY ROW.

Next Row will be as follows:  Knit 3 with the first border yarn.  Pick up the body color yarn.  Twist the 2 strands together.  Drop the border yarn. Knit 16 with the body color. Pick up the 2nd border color yarn.  Twist the 2 strands together.  Drop the body yarn. Knit 3 with the 2nd border yarn.

Next Row after that will repeat the purl border row from above.

But how do I keep my yarn from twisting together?

If you always connect the strands of yarn in the same way each time, the yarn will not get tangled since each row will unwrap the twist in the yarn from the previous row.  This is why the yarn must always be wrapped by bringing the yarn you are ready to pick up and work with behind the yarn you just finished and are ready to drop.

How do I keep the loop where I started the new color from being too loose when I am working the next row?

When working the stitch on the same peg that you joined your new color, gently pull the tail to tighten up the stitch.  Do not pull it too tight though.  Just enough to close up the loose stitch when you go to weave in the end.

If I were to write it out like a “real” pattern, it will look like this after the bottom border.

Row 1:  K3, drop border color, pick up body color, K16, drop body color, pick up border color, K3

Row 2:  P3, drop border color, pick up body color, K16, drop body color, pick up border color, P3

Repeat rows 1 – 2 until the work reaches desired length.

The twisting of the yarn together will always happen but  not be written in the instructions.  Also the colors will most likely be abbreviated with the abbreviations at the beginning of the pattern.

After working my desired number of rows, I am now ready for my top border after finishing a row with purls for the border.

Top Border

When you are ready to work the top border, you can cut the body color yarn and left side border yarn leaving tails long enough to weave in without cutting the right border yarn since this is the yarn we will use to work the top border.  If you are working in the opposite direction from what I am demonstrating then just switch those sides.  Just do NOT cut the side that you just finished the last row with.

Also you will need to start the border with the row of knit if using garter stitch.

I have now worked the top border with 8 rows of garter stitch to match the bottom border.

Bind off in your desired method, weave in those very few ends, and admire your work!

 

 

Now you are armed and ready to amaze people with your ability to loom knit an afghan with a different color border from the body.  So get with it!  *cracking whip*  Amaze us!

 

 

 

 

But above all, have fun!  Enjoy your work and let the loom knitting bring you joy and peace.  Happy loom knitting!

2 Comments

  • Oh, i have been wondering how to do this forever! Thank you soooo very much! I am going to try it!

  • Thank you so much for this tutorial! I actually wanted to make something this way recently and had no idea how to do it.

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Mar 20, 2017

Bamboo Stitch (Double Knit)

Bamboo reminds us of tall erect stalks, and this version of the double knit rib looks very similar.  A very pretty design for most anything worked with even number of stitches.  The wide ribs are formed with 4 stitches in a series, but when opened, you will see lacy opening in center, between the 4 stitches.

bamboo stitch

Since this is a single pass of the loom, we will show illustration of 1st 10 stitches with row #1 and then, the 2nd illustration is row #2.

Bamboo stitch(2)

Row #1:     1          2           3             4              5             6             7             8              9           10

Bamboo stitch(2)

Row #2:     1             2             3           4            5             6              7                8            9             10

The minimum number of stitches to create this pattern would be 6 sts.  After that, add 4 more, so you can do it with 10 sts or 14 sts, 18 sts, or 22 sts, and on.  The reason for this is each row starts with either the 2 single wraps or the double wrap and it needs to end with same wrap.  You can see that the first 2 sts are back/to/back wraps.  The next 2 sts create a square or double wrap.  You keep alternating the 2 stitch series, and end with the series same as you began the row.  The next row or row #2, will start and end with the opposite series.

Look at the illustration and see the row #1 weave, the pegs 1 & 2 are single, pegs 3 & 4 are a double, pegs 5 & 6 are single, and 7 & 8 are a double, and 9 & 10 are single.

The row #2 will start with pegs 1 & 2 double, pegs 3 & 4 single, pegs 5 & 6 double, pegs 7 & 8 single, pegs 9 & 10 are double.  Once you do this a few rows, you will get comfortable with it and see your pretty design emerge.

How do you look at the completed row and know for sure which series you have just completed?  If you look at the illustration carefully, you will notice that with row 1, the yarn ends at peg #10.  That means that you just completed the 2 single pegs, so you want to start the next row with the double pegs.

If you look at row #2, you see that you end with the yarn coming from peg #9, so you just completed the double sts and will start the next row with 2 single sts.

Cast On in pattern(sample), or with stockinette, using row #1 as first row of pattern.  We will show only the first 10 sts.

Row #1:  Weave around peg #1 top, down to peg #1 bottom, up to peg #2 top, and down to peg #2 bottom.  Weave the next 4 pegs per the diagram.  Then next 2 consecutive, and continue across loom.

                                                                                

 

 

After the first row, lay the anchor yarn. Turn the loom around and work row #2. You are now starting with the 4 pegs, then 2 adjacent, then 4 pegs according to diagram.

You are ready to hook over.  Repeat row#1 and hook over.  Repeat row #2, and hook over.

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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3 Comments

  • This is a beautiful stitch. Thank you for the tutorial and the diagram really helps!

  • Thank you Cindy. It is fun to do once you get comfortable with the sequence. Pat

  • Thank you so much for sharing the double knit stitches. I prefer to use my boards for double knit, and all the stitchology techniques were beautiful but sadly “one sided”. Look forward to the Twisted Purl.

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Mar 16, 2017

Stitchology 30: Twisted Trellis Stitch

*Updated on March 20, 2017 , specifically Rows 4 & 12 of pattern when working multiple repeats.

The celebration of the Fair Isle has come again…March is the month of St Patrick’s Day!  What better way to put us in the true spirit of all things green and magical than to work a stitch that whorls and twists across the pegs?   If it looks rather complicated to manage, no worries, because it’s actually a fairly easy stitch to do!  The cables are done by simply twisting two peg’s stitches at a time as you work through the rows.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Special Stitch Instructions

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 8—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The cables in this pattern involve simply trading the loops of 2 pegs in the correct order. They consist of a Right Twist [rt2] (a twist with the sts running to the right), and a Left Twist [lt2] (a twist with the sts running to the left).  They are worked as follows:

[rt2]:  Worked over 2 pegs: Lift the loop from the peg on the right and either hold in your fingers, or place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the left and move it to the peg on the right.  Place the held loop onto the peg on the left.  With the working yarn, knit the 2 pegs.

[lt2]:  Worked over 2 pegs: Lift the loop from the peg on the left and either hold in your fingers, or place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the right and move it to the peg on the left.  Place the held loop onto the peg on the right.  With the working yarn, knit the 2 pegs.

*An easy way to remember which direction to go is to remember to hold the stitch on the side of the slant.  So…for a right twist, hold the loop on the right.  For a left twist, hold the loop on the left.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The squares in the chart that are highlighted with yellow are fluctuating stitches, depending on how many repeats of the 8 stitch pattern are being worked.  If there is only one set of 8 stitches, these highlighted squares are simply purled.  If, however, there is more than one repeat of the 8 stitches, then these squares become the twists, either right or left, that are noted in the chart and instructions below (see Rows 4 & 12).

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1:  p1, k2, p5

Row 2:  p5, LT2, p1

Row 3:  RT2, LT2, p4

Row 4:  ***When working Row 4 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, LT2, p3.

***When working Row 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, LT2, p2, *RT2, p2, LT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Row 5: p4, LT2, RT2

Row 6:  p1, LT2, p5

Row 7:   p5, k2, p1

Row 8:   Repeat Row 6

Row 9:   Repeat Row 7

Row 10: Repeat Row 6

Row 11:  p4, RT2, LT2

Row 12:  ***When working Row 12 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, RT2, p3.

***When working Row 12 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, RT2, p2, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Row 13:  LT2, RT2, p4

Row 14:  p5, LT2, p1

Row 15:  Repeat Row 1

Row 16:  Repeat Row 2

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Round 1:  p1, k2, p5

Round 2:  p1, LT2, p5

Round 3:  RT2, LT2, p4

Round 4:  ***When working Round 4 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, LT2, p3.

***When working Round 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, LT2, p2, *RT2, p2, LT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Round 5: p4, LT2, RT2

Round 6:  p5, LT2, p1

Round 7:   p5, k2, p1

Round 8:   Repeat Row 6

Round 9:   Repeat Row 7

Round 10: Repeat Row 6

Round 11:  p4, RT2, LT2

Round 12:  ***When working Round 12 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, RT2, p3.

***When working Round 12 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions:  p3, RT2, p2, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Round 13:  LT2, RT2, p4

Round 14:  p1, LT2, p5

Round 15:  Repeat Row 1

Round 16:  Repeat Row 2

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

7 Comments

  • This is a very cute stitch pattern and I like the new format. Thanks for taking the time to introduce us to differnt stitch patterns and the full instructions. Would the look of the backside be suitable for a scarf? Or better worked in the round as a tube scarf? I am currently working on the barber pole stitch pattern and I cant loom quick enough to try this one!

  • Hi CindyB! :) I’m so pleased you’ve been liking both the stitches and the new format.

    The back of this stitch is pretty cute! It almost looks like mermaid scales, or reversed honeycomb. It would make a nice scarf, in my opinion. :)

    Bethany~

  • I had a question on row 4
    ***When working Row 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, end p1

    As written, the stitch count is 12 stitches . So if i do two repeats of the stitch pattern, That would be 20 stitches? Rows 1-3 are multiples of 8 so how do i make up the difference of 4 stitches on rows 1-3? Sorry to ask…

  • Hi Cindy :) Please don’t ever be sorry for asking a question. I’m always happy to help! …and in this case, you actually helped *me*! :D

    Okay…this part is a little bit confusing, so let me see if I can help explain in another way. If you look at the chart for the repeating stitch pattern, you’ll see that in Row 4 the pattern sort of overlaps itself where it actually extends into two extra stitches on each side of the 8 pegs of the pattern. This row, with those stitches in place, actually begins with a right twist. Because the pattern won’t be beginning the row with a peg it doesn’t actually have, this right twist won’t happen yet. You will start the row with 3 purls, just this first time through the repeat. Then you’ll begin working the pattern repeat: LT2, p2, RT2, p2. Where I actually ended up adjusting the pattern was where to put that little ‘ol asterisk. It should be in front of the RT2 so that the repeating pattern will end with the LT2, p2. The corrections are now included in the pattern above.

    For your convenience, your instructions all written out for 2 repeats of the pattern would be:
    p3, LT2, p2, RT2, p2, LT2, p2, p1. = 16 pegs. :)

    Thanks for checking in so that we could get this nailed down!
    Bethany~

  • Thank you for the help Bethany. I am starting my scarf tonight.

  • I am trying to make the squares as we were doing previously on the loom
    I went to the Ravelry site and found the pattern with the squares that have symbols for the different stitches
    But the rows are different and Rt2 is sometimes LT2 due to the even and odd rows being different?
    If I follow your pattern and just add the border 2 rows will it come out ok?
    Also is there a way to copy the Ravelry chart enlarged?
    I’ve been trying for days to do this
    HELP. PLEASE
    Thanks

  • Hi Ginny :)

    The actual row numbers of the entire square pattern will differ a bit from the Repeating Stitch Pattern, because there have been added additional rows and stitches into the square’s design. Because of this, you won’t use the video to make the square as written. You can learn the stitches through the video, then use the chart’s instructions to work the square correctly. The instructions will generally be the same…it’s just the row numbers that will be different. Also, please see the notes below the video (as well as here in the pattern post), as there were a couple rows that were adjusted. ;)

    As for saving the chart from Ravelry, simply click on the chart so that it is featured in the pop-out style, right click on the photo and choose the “Save As” option to save to your computer.
    Hope that all helps get you going!
    Bethany~

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Feb 20, 2017

Loom FAQs: Is It Garter, Rib, or Seed Stitch?

 

 

 

 

 

The great thing about learning the purl stitch is that when combined with the knit stitch the possibilities seem to become limitless.  There are lots of stitch patterns that only include a combination of knit and purl stitches.

But the first ones learned include garter, rib, and seed stitches.  This is when the confusion comes into play.  All 3 include the instructions of 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  Beginners tend to get this confused.  Does K1, P1 mean rows or stitches?  What makes rib and seed different?  Why does my seed stitch not look correct?  Why does my rib stitch look weird?  You mean to tell me that isn’t the garter stitch?  But that is what I was told…  It goes on and on.

Let’s begin with our basic stitches again.  I won’t go into all the knit stitches since you can find all that information in Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch??.  It explains the different names and way of working the knit stitch on a knitting loom.  But I will recap the true knit stitch and the purl stitch here for convenience.

 

What is the difference between the true knit stitch and the purl stitch?

Working the true or traditional knit stitch is very similar to how a purl stitch is worked.  There really is only 1 difference.  The purl is basically a backward knit stitch so you are just working the knit stitch backward.

Now I know that statement was confusing so let’s see how each stitch is worked through the magic of photography.

Knit Stitch

In patterns when it says knit and doesn’t specify which method of knit stitch, it most likely means to use the true knit stitch.  The other methods except e-wrap are just for ease or tension purposes.  The reason that I do not include e-wrap in that statement is that e-wrap is a twisted knit stitch and will give the finished work a different look.

 

 

To work the knit stitch, bring the working yarn across the TOP of the loop on the peg.

Then bring the loom pick from the bottom, up through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn down through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

Purl Stitch

There is only 1 way to work the purl stitch.  And it is not spelled pearl.  Pearls are what is not suppose to be before swine.  Purls are for knitting.

 

To work the purl stitch, bring the working yarn across the BOTTOM of the loop on the peg.  This is where the confusion between the knit and purl stitch happens.

Then bring the loom pick from the top, down through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn up through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To recap, the knit stitch is from the top, and the purl is from the bottom.

 

Knit & Purl Stitch Patterns

Now on to the different stitches created by using both knit and purl stitches.  Since I will be writing out the instructions like they are written in patterns, you can refresh your memory on how to read a pattern in Loom FAQs:  How Do I Read A Pattern?

Also if you need a refresher on how to identify a knit stitch from a purl stitch, you can read how in Loom FAQs:  Is It A Knit Or Purl?

Abbreviations

K:  Knit

P:  Purl

 

Garter Stitch

Garter Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Row 1:  K all

Row 2:  P all

Repeat rows 1 – 2

 

What is a garter ridge?

Garter stitch is always written by rows.  2 rows equals 1 garter ridge.  Therefore if a pattern says to work a certain number of garter ridges, you will need to work twice that many rows since each ridge is equal to 2 rows.

 

Rib Stitch

1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a few variations of the rib stitch.  1×1 rib is what I will explain.  There is also a 2×2 rib and 3×3 rib stitches.

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

When working the rib stitch, each row must have the knits on the same pegs as the knit stitches and purls on the same pegs as the purl stitches in previous row/round for each row/round.  This makes the columns of knits and purls that creates the ribbing.

 

What if I am working in the round with an odd number peg count?

You will then need to add an extra knit or purl on that last peg before starting the new round.  I like adding an extra purl since it will not be noticed as much as an extra knit.  As you can see in the pictures above, the purls like to hide between the knit stitches.

 

Which version of the rib stitch is the stretchiest?

2×2 ribbing is the stretchiest of the rib stitches which makes it the best choice for cuffs on socks.

2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed Stitch

Seed Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to the nature of seed stitch, the stitch pattern is written differently depending on if it’s a flat panel or in the round and whether it is even or odd stitch count.

 

For even number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

 

For even number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to the end

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the end

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to the next to last peg, K1

Row 2:  *P1, K2, repeat from * to the next to the last peg, P1

Repeat rows 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to last peg, K1

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the last peg, P1

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

What makes seed stitch different from rib stitch?

While the rib stitch has the columns of knits and purls, seed stitch must have the knits on top of the purls of the previous row and purls on top of the knits of the previous row.  This is why the peg count makes the instructions different between even peg counts and odd peg counts.

 

What is the difference between seed stitch and moss stitch?

The seed stitch and the moss stitch are the exact same stitch.  Just depends on where you live what this stitch is called.

 

Do any of these stitches curl?

No.  When worked correctly, all 3 of these stitches will not curl making them all great options for hat brims and borders for flat panels.

Also the back of the these stitches are the same as the front.

 

I really do hope this helps explain the differences between these 3 stitches that all involve 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  It can be confusing at first.  But carry on!  Work a swatch with each one.  This will help get it in your brain better on how each one is different.

Then you will be ready for the plethora of other stitch patterns that only use knit and purl stitches.

Happy loom knitting!

 

5 Comments

  • When I first saw this stitch up close (above), it reminded me of the Eiffel Tower ;) I love it!

  • I just love the design of this poncho – but do not have a loom. Could this be adapted for hand knitting on needles and if so how as I’m not to adventurous and could not be able to transform it.
    Thank you in advance

  • I have recently purchased the shorty socks kit, utilizing the KB Sock Loom 2. The written instructions for the shorty socks, indicate as follows:

    Rd 1-8: *k2 p2; repeat from * to end of round

    Rd 9 and 10 *k2, p2, repeat from * to end.

    I understand the concept of the 2×2, My question is what is the difference between the two instructions. For some reason I’m missing it. In my mind if they were the same, the instruction would have been written as Rd 1-10. Please advise. Thank you

  • The stitch pattern for the leg portion starts at Rnd 9. It is the same as the previous round, but it is there to show that it is part of the leg portion, not the cuff.

  • I’m pretty much a beginner at loom knitting, even though I’ve been loom knitting for a few years, as I work, take care of my kid etc and don’t have a lot of time to knit. Recently I started making a cowl on an oval loom for my daughter. I believe I started out using the e wrap for one row, then the purl for the next row. I thought I was using the knit stitch but looked on YouTube, and saw the knit stitch as pretty much an upside down or backward (?) Purl. I had only done a few rows of e wrap so I changed to the other knit stitch. It looks pretty good. I didn’t realize there were so many ways to do a knit stitch. Am I knitting the garter stitch? Where can I buy your looms? Do you sell any books on loom knitting?

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Feb 20, 2017

Spiraling Rope Stitch (double knit)

This is a version of a favorite Rib Stitch in Double Knit. These wide ribs will make a great sweater, vest or blanket.  Even our beginners will enjoy a new twist to the knit/rib stitch.

stitch_purple

This Spiraling Rope Stitch reminds us of a wide rib, but it’s actually a shifting rib, front to back. It’s also great for a scarf or afghan that gets flipped over and over. Can’t tell the front from the back. It’s very stretchy and fun to work up.

Each rib is approximately 3/4″ wide and the inset is the center of the rib on opposite side, so it shifts after each set of double stitches.

 

spiral rope purple

0      1           2          3           4          5          6           7          8            9          10          1         12

Loom: 10” knitting loom, or any loom with 21+ pegs with a width of 1 cm between the rails.

In this stitch, you will work with any amount of stitches divisible by 3.

Yarn: Worsted weight #4 wool or blend. Our sample is worked with Lion Brand Heartland Worsted weight yarn.

Abbreviations:  L=left, R=right

Instructions:

Cast On 21 stitches (or as many as desired with multiple of 3).  Start on L end of loom on top peg 3.

Step 1: Place slipknot on peg 3 top.

Step 2: Come down to lower peg 3 and wrap counter-clockwise.

Step 3: Take yarn up to peg 6 top wrapping clockwise, and then down to lower peg 6 counter-clockwise.

Step 4: Skip 2 pegs and take yarn up to peg 9 top wrapping clockwise, and then down to lower peg 9 and wrap counter-clockwise.

Step 5: Continue across the loom till you have wrapped the last stitch of your pattern. In our sample, we are illustrating only the first 12 stitches.  Notice on the last wrap, the yarn goes around the outside of pegs.  Turn loom around.

Step 6-the return: Take yarn to first of 2 empty pegs, peg 10 top and down to lower peg 11. Continue up to top peg 11 wrapping in counter-clockwise direction. Continue down to lower peg 10, wrapping in clockwise direction.

Step 7: Work all empty pegs in same manner until you end at lower peg 1. Lay anchor yarn.

Repeat all steps 1 thru 7 in each row. Work until your square/project is as long as desired. Bind off at loom and anchor yarn once complete.

Note:  You may like to start with a Stockinette cast on, and one row of stockinette at end of work for easy bind offs.  This is done in sample.

Let’s look at the Spiraling Rope on the loom with each step:  After cast on, starting with the 3rd peg, wrap to end of stitches.  Return by wrapping last pegs straight across at end of loom.  Follow diagram and wrap all empty pegs as you return

Here you are completing the wrap.  And then last photo is a completed row, ready to hook over.  Just continue weaving this row until the knitted piece is as long as desired, or you feel that you have learned the Spiraling Rib stitch.

 

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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3 Comments

  • I especially like that bamboo stitch. Have you ever shown how to do that one before?

  • I love all of these. I hope we can learn the other two variations…tan and cream. Thank you for the how to instructions and the Diagram is an awesome addition.

  • I like the twisted purl and the bamboo?

    Do you have a video for it?

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Feb 14, 2017

Stitchology 29: Lacy Hearts

We will be changing the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Special Stitch Instructions

*All yarn overs (yo) are completed by laying the working yarn loosely across the front of the peg, not e-wrapping.

*For ease in reading the directions below, the steps  involving yarn overs and eyelets are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two or three pegs.

There are three ways of creating eyelets for this pattern: the Knit 2 Together (k2tog) for a right leaning eyelet worked as a knit, the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) for a left leaning eyelet worked as a knit, and a Knit 3 Together (k3tog), a decrease that creates an eyelet on either side.  The following dictates how to work these stitches as you will find them in the stitch pattern:

[k2tog, yo]:  Worked from right to left. Move the loop from yo peg to the k2tog peg. Knit the k2tog peg, working the two bottom loops as one. Loosely carry the WY across the front of the empty yo peg and continue to the next stitch as the pattern dictates.

[yo, ssk]: Worked from right to left. Move the loop from yo peg to the ssk peg. Loosely carry the WY across the front of the empty yo peg, then knit the next peg, working the two loops as one.

[yo, k3tog, yo]: (As seen in Row 7 of the pattern) Worked from right to left. Move the loops from the yo pegs to the k3tog peg.  Carry the WY loosely across the first empty yo peg, then work all 3 loops as 1 on the k3tog peg. Carry the WY loosely across the front of the next empty yo peg and work the next stitch as the pattern dictates.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working both as a flat panel and in the round  (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1:  *yo, ssk, k6, rep from *

Row 2 and all even rows to Row 16:  knit all

Row 3: *k1, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, rep from *

Row 5:  *k2, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, rep from *

Row 7:  *yo, k3tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, rep from *

Row 9:  *k4, yo, ssk, k2, rep from *

Row 11:  *k2, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k1, rep from *

Row 13:  *k1, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, rep from *

Row 15:  *k2, yo, ssk, yo, k3tog, yo, k1, rep from *

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

11 Comments

  • Please still include a picture of the knit square so have a reference instead of going to blog to view when knitting it. Thanks

  • Hi Bethany I love this column and am hooked on loom knitting but my previous comment regarding a picture Is just that I want to see the finished product just as you had previously. The video idea is absolutely fantastic and makes the stitches so easy to understand. Thanks so much for this column!

  • I want to continue with the 8 by 8 squares
    How many repeats should I do
    How many repeats across and what should I do for the ends
    Also how much wool
    What color and make and yardage of wool to make square
    This info was included on the other squares
    Also I would like it if you had the graphic of the entire square as before

    I love the video it is so clear
    Excellent but would appreciate the other info
    Thank you for any attention to this as I do want to continue the squares

  • Hi Maureen :)

    You are right…the photo of the square square should also be featured, and it has been added for your convenience. I’m so glad to hear you like the video!

    Bethany~

  • Hi Ginny :)

    I will let you in on a little secret: due to the extra time involved with creating the video, an entire pattern for the square will not be posted here, but the chart for an 8″ x 8″ square and yarn information is currently located at the Ravelry page for the stitch. I hope this will help you continue to make gorgeous stitches with us! :) http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lacy-hearts-stitchology-29

    Bethany~

  • I have just taken an interest in loom knitting, can you tell me what that casting on gadget is called so I can get one, and why in some patterns do you skip pegs? How do you decide which pegs to skip?

  • Hi Janice :)

    I’m not exactly sure what you mean by “casting on gadget”…do you mean the loom tool/hook that is used to work the stitches on the loom? I use a crochet hook to actually begin the project to add stitches to the loom. Either one of these tools can be found at your local craft stores, and the loom tool can be found at knittingboard.com.

    There are several reasons why you would skip a peg in a project. One is to create eyelets, which you see demonstrated here in this post. Another is to “slip” a stitch, which is simply to skip it. This is done 1) on the first peg of every row to create a nicely finished chain look on the edges of your knitted item, and 2) in the project itself to cause the loop from the row below to be pulled up and elongated a bit when it is knitted on the row following the row with the slipped stitch. Occasionally a stitch is slipped and the working yarn is actually carried to the front of the knitting instead of the back. This creates an interesting texture in your knitting, with a horizontal line across that slipped stitch in the finished piece.

  • Thank you that info was very helpful
    Also thanks for the terrific videos
    I love them all

  • I am having a problem with taking the yarn over
    I am using the u knit stitch
    It’s way too tight to move over
    Any hints how to make easier for that yarn over
    Is it the worsted wool or just my tension
    Help

  • Ginny…yep! It all comes down to tension how easy it is to move the stitches around. You’ll just want to loosen up your u-stitches by pulling the hook back a little bit extra when you knit off your loops. ;)

  • Lovely work, Sunshine!

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Jan 16, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Tighten The Cast On?

 

 

 

 

 

While there are lots of ways to cast on a project, the cast on we learn first is the E-wrap Cast On.  But most people do not like to use it because it is also the loosest cast on.  Which, of course, leads to questions…  Why is my cast on edge so loose?  How can I make it tighter?

Most will answer by saying “use a different cast on”.  There really is a cast on for every type of project.  And we all have our favorite cast on.  But most of those do have have enough stretch for some projects.

I want a stretchy cast on but the e-wrap cast on is still too loose making the edge messy!   Not a question but is still a cry for help.  Let’s get going on how to work a not-so-messy-tight-and-tidy e-wrap cast on!

How do I work an e-wrap cast on?

If you think that we are learning a new cast on, then you might be a bit disappointed.  You will not be disappointed in the outcome of this e-wrap cast on when finished though.

While most already know how to work an e-wrap cast on, there are some that need to make a small adjustment in order to get a cleaner finish.  And that small adjustment is how you use the slip knot to start.

If you are new to loom knitting, then here is how to work an e-wrap cast on.

First, make a slip knot.  But do not put it on the first or last peg depending on if you are working a flat panel or in the round.  You will want to use an anchor peg.  If your loom doesn’t have an separate anchor peg, then you will need to use an adjacent peg to put the slip knot on.  Then you will take it off after you get going on your project.  Just be sure to not use it as as a loop on the cast on.

Why can I not use the slip knot as the first loop?

Besides not having a knot in your work, you will not be able to completely finish tightening up the cast on if you use the slip knot as the first loop.

Flat Panel

If working a flat panel, most patterns are written so that the first row is worked from right to left.  That means that the cast on must be worked from left to right.

 

This is my Peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will be the last peg for my flat panel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have more pegs than being used, place the slip knot next to the last peg so you are starting your cast on on the last peg of row 1.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are using all the pegs on a round loom, then you will need to actually place the slip knot on the first peg.  Then start working the cast on to the right back around ending on the first peg.

In The Round

 

 

For hats and other projects worked in the round, place the slip knot on the last peg and then work the cast on from the first peg around from right to left.

 

 

 

 

 

How do you work the e-wrap cast on after the slip knot is placed?

 

 

Wrap each peg by bringing the working yarn around the back of the peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to the front and around to the back again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then go the back of the next peg and wrap it in the same manner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue wrapping all the pegs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pegs look like this when the cast on is finished.

 

 

 

And how the cast on looks from the top of the pegs.

 

 

Do I need to work the 1st row on a flat panel from right to left?  Or work from right to left when working in the round?  Why can I not go in the other direction?

Generally speaking, yes.  While most of use are more comfortable working only one direction, patterns are written this way for a good reason.  Consistency is one.  Also certain stitches like cables are written this way so the stitches can be worked correctly.

A lot of patterns can be worked either way.  But remember when you want to say it’s easier working in a certain direction:  when working a flat panel, you must work in both directions.  That cannot be avoided.

Therefore the sooner you start being consistent with working row 1 from right to left and always working in the round from right to left, the easier it will be to follow patterns that require it.

Do you work a row of stitches before starting row 1?

The e-wrap cast on is just that.  Every peg is wrapped once.  Once the number of pegs are wrapped, the cast on is complete, and row 1 is ready to be worked.

The cast on is NOT considered the first row.  It’s more like the foundation to get started.

How do I tighten the cast on so it’s not messy and loose?

While you can tighten the cast on while it’s still on the loom, I wait until it’s off the loom before starting.

Now is when the magic happens.

 

On a flat panel, start on the end opposite from the tail.   I hold my panel with the tail on the left side and work from the right to the left.

 

 

 

 

 

When working in the round, find the last stitch next to the tail which was the last stitch in each round.  Then you will work from the left to the right around the piece to the tail.

 

 

 

 

 

I will continue to demonstrate on a flat panel.

 

 

 

Find the first loop and with your fingers or loom pick,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gently pull it snug from the edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then find the next loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and gently pull it snug.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue with each stitch until you get to the tail.  With each stitch, the loop you are pulling will get bigger.

 

 

Then when the tail is reached, the loop itself will disappear as it’s pulled snugly.  This is why the slip knot is not used as a cast on loop.  You will not be able to tighten up that last loop with the tail if you used a slip knot.

 

 

 

 

The cast on will then be tidier but still stretchy.

 

 

 

I preferred the yarn over (double e-wrap) cast on for the longest time when I needed a cast on that is stretchy.  But now I prefer to tighten the e-wrap cast on instead.  It gives you more control over how tight you make the cast on edge but still has stretch.

I hope this helps so that everyone has a nice, tight, and tidy e-wrap cast on!  Happy loom knitting!

2 Comments

  • Thank you for the very informative article. I am going make a small swatch and try this technique.

  • Wow, this is a great tip! I prefer double e wrapping each peg as my cast on because it is neater, but I am going to try this on my next project!

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Dec 19, 2016

Loom FAQs: Why Are There No Loom Knit Magazines? Or… The DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia

 

 

 

 

 

Over and over I keep seeing the same question.  Why are there not any magazines for loom knitting?  Well that is a rather simple question to answer.  Because there is not enough interest.  Then that answer leads to But loom knitting is so popular right now!  Yes.  But not popular enough.

Years ago, I worked in the craft publishing industry.  And learned quite a lot about what it takes to publish books, magazines, and pamphlets.  Publishing companies do not want to invest in crafts that are not booming.  And yes.  There is a difference between popular and booming.

Just take a look at the number of published books on loom knitting.  In the scheme of things, there are very few compared to needle knit and crochet.  I own almost all of the published book on loom knitting.  I have a love of books and a “need” to own them.  There is just something about the feel and smell of a book…

But even with all the books we do have, some have different information than others.  Most only contain what information and instruction are needed for the projects in that particular book.  None of them contain everything.  Which leads me to the actual topic for today…  DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia.  What??  Yes!  Let’s just make our own encyclopedia of loom knitting.

Years ago, I started collecting all info regarding loom knitting.  I printed off EVERYTHING.  But then I needed a way to store and organize it.  And everything that I have learned about this I will share with you today.

Where do I find information for my DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia?

Well for starters, the Knitting Board blog is a great place to start for techniques, stitch patterns, projects, and more.  This blog is like a virtual magazine.  Each month there are articles, patterns, stitch patterns, etc., and it’s all free!  Lots of information just waiting to be printed off.

There are also lots of other websites that contain loom knitting information.  And then there are those books I mentioned.

But what about copyright?  How does that affect my DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia?

Following copyright laws is very important.  You can learn more about copyright in  Loom FAQs:  What is Copyright? Trademark?  But the one thing that I will reiterate here is the following.

A person can make a copy off of the internet for their own personal use.  Like for their personal DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia.

Also a person can make a copy of any book that they OWN for their own personal use.  No, you cannot make a copy of a loom knitting book at the library.  It is not considered a reference book so it is not allowed under copyright law.  But if you already own the book, you can make copies of pages that you need to put into your diy encyclopedia.  This way you can get all the instructions from those books all in one place.

What do I need then?

First of all, you will need a home printer/copier with lots of ink and printer paper.  Without that, you cannot even get started.  Got those?  Great!  Let’s continue…

3 Ring Binder

 

 

You will also need a 3 ring binder.  One large one if you want to put everything in one binder.  Or you can get the thinner ones if you want to divide up the information in separate “volumes”.  This option is great for people who like to be fancy by having a multi-volume encyclopedia.  Or for those that  just do not want to lug out a huge, heavy binder every time they want to look something up because they are not weight lifters.  Like me…

 

 

 

Plastic Sleeves

 

You will also want to invest in some plastic sleeves.  While I say “invest”, they really are not that expensive.  You can buy a package of 25 for approximately $5.  Or if you are like me and want put all the info you can find into a multi-volume set, packages of 200 plastic sleeves are about $20.  You can find them at office supply stores and even in the office supply aisle at your local discount store where you buy your 3 ring binders.

While you can just use a 3 hole punch on the paper, the pages will not last as long and sometimes even gets the holes over the printed part causing you to lose information.

 

 

Dividers

 

While you can buy dividers that that have the tabs already on them, I know from experience if you are using the plastic sleeves that the tabs will not stick out far enough on most of the 3 ring binder tab dividers.

There are tab dividers now that are plastic sleeve dividers.  This are wide enough but do cost just a bit more.

If you can find the tabs themselves that are not on dividers, then you can make your own with the plastic sleeves.

 

 

 

How do I assemble it?

First you need to print off the pages you want off the internet and copy the pages you need from the books that you own.

You will need to have some sort of idea of how you want to divide things up.  Such as a small binder for techniques with dividers for cast ons, bind offs, knit and purl stitch instruction, etc.

Maybe another small binder (unless you are putting everything into a big binder) for stitch patterns because you have printed off every one of Bethany Dailey’s Stitchology columns and want to have it in book form.

Or Jenny Stark’s Whimsical Loom Knits to go into the pattern section of your DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia with the other patterns you have printed off the KB Blog.

Don’t forget Loom FAQs!  Although you might want to sort those out into the different categories.

Can I print front and back of the paper?

While you can print on both sides of the paper in order to use less paper, I find that the ink does bleed through unless you have purchased higher quality printer paper.  I usually just use the paper I have and print on 1 side.  But that is entirely up to you.

Now what?

Slide the printed pages into the plastic sleeves.  If printing only on one side of the page, put 2 consecutive pages back to back before sliding them into the sleeve.

Then put them in the binder.  Simple as that!

If you bought the binders that have the sleeves on the front and side, you can then print off a “cover” and “spine” as well.

But most importantly, make it your own.  Get creative with your DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia!    Put everything in it or just the things that are important to you.

Don’t forget!

Just remember that you cannot sell it or give it away.  It is for your own personal use only.

But what if I want to make one as a gift?

You can buy the items needed and assemble it but leave it empty of printed material to give as a gift.  But the recipient will need to print off their own pages to put into it.  Along with avoiding copyright violations, this way they can make it their own and in a way that is most helpful for them.

I hope this helps you create something that is useful to you and can be added to as more information becomes available.  Keep on loom knitting!

 

1 Comment

  • This is a fabulous idea! I love it, and will try to start compiling my own soon!

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Nov 21, 2016

Loom FAQs: What is a Lifeline?

Loom FAQs

 

 

 

 

 

I cannot count the number of times I have seen the question asked How do I save my work now that I have made a mistake?  Or the emphatic statement of defeat It is ruined.

And the answer every time is You should have used a lifeline.

Which always leads to more questions…

But what is a lifeline?  How do I use a lifeline?  Do I need to put on in BEFORE I start knitting?  Can I put in AFTER I start?  What do I need to use for a lifeline?

What is a lifeline?

You are sitting there loom knitting one day, and you see a mistake you made several rows back.  OH the HORROR!!!  Then you yell out to your best friend, “Hey, Betty Sue!  My work has a hole!  I’m sinking fast!  Throw me a lifeline!”  That is when Betty Sue looks at you like you have lost your ever loving mind.  Because Betty Sue knows that is not the way a lifeline in knitting works.  And because Betty Sue is a cat…

If that is not how a lifeline works, then what exactly is it?  Well it is a safety line that will help save your work.  It is a piece of yarn that is run through all the stitches to hold them so that your stitches are safe if you need to rip your work back to that point and can be easily put back on the loom.

When do I need a lifeline?

There are different reasons to need a lifeline.  Maybe you are working on a complicated stitch pattern and just want to make sure you have that added protection so you can take the work out if you make a mistake without losing the entire piece.  Or maybe you are wanting to remove your work from the loom because you are decreasing or increasing and are needing to adjust your loom size when using the All-n-One loom or needing to change the loom entirely.

What is the best lifeline to use?

The best lifeline to use is yarn or string that is as follows:

– the same or smaller weight yarn than the yarn you are using so that it will easily go through the stitches

– a contrasting color from your work so it is easy to see

– a fiber type that will easily slide through the stitches like a microfiber or nylon

That last if very important if you are using mohair or another fiber type that easily gets tangled with itself.  Otherwise, if you are using a well spun acrylic, then you can just use acrylic of another color.

Do I need to put it in BEFORE or can I add it LATER?

While it is easier to put in a lifeline before you need it, you can add one later.  Adding it later can be trickier especially if it’s a more complex stitch pattern like cables or lace.  In the case of cables or lace, it is always better to put it in first.

How to place a lifeline BEFORE needing it

When using a lifeline before you need it, you will need to check your work periodically for errors.  If you do not find one, then you will remove the lifeline and place it again where you are.  That way if there is a mistake then you do not need to take it out quite as far.

You will first need to cut your chosen lifeline yarn several inches longer than the work is on the loom.  If you are working in the round, use a piece that will wrap around the loom twice.  If working a flat panel, use a lifeline that is twice the length of the pegs being used.  Or just wrap that yarn around the loom twice no matter if it’s in the round or a flat panel.  If using the afghan loom or another type of figure 8 shape loom, follow the pegs with the yarn around it once then cut it twice as long.

Now you will need to run that lifeline through each stitch on the loom.  There are 2 ways to do this.

You can thread your lifeline on a tapestry needle and run the needle through each stitch.

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or you can just use your loom pick to pull the lifeline through each stitch.  This is my favorite method.

1

 

I like to pull it from the bottom of the loop like a purl but it can be done from the top like a knit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

Be sure and pull the lifeline to the side and back of the peg before going to the next stitch.

 

 

 

 

5

 

Now the lifeline is running through each stitch but behind the peg so it will not interfere with your next row of work.

 

 

 

 

Once you have the lifeline place, you will continue with your work ignoring that extra strand.  When you know you haven’t made a mistake after working several inches of work, remove the lifeline by simply pulling it out.  Then put it back in the stitches that are on the pegs and start again.

How to place a lifeline AFTER needing it

Like I said previously, some stitch patterns are very hard to add afterward.  But if you are just working something simple like stockinette and discover something weird that you have no clue how you did but want to fix, you can add a lifeline into the work a couple of rows below the offending place.  Then you can rip the piece back to that point and easily place the work back on the loom and start again.

You will need to use a tapestry needle for this so thread your chosen lifeline into that needle and let’s get started!

9

 

Find the edge stitch and run the needle though one side a few rows below the mistake.  If it’s worked in the round, start with the stitch that was worked on peg 1 so the starting stitch will still be the same when placed back on the loom.

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

Then run the needle through the next stitch making sure you are staying on the same row.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

This is what it will look like when all the stitches are on the lifeline.

 

 

 

13

 

Then you pull the previous stitches out until all you have are the stitches on the lifeline ready to be put back on the loom.

 

 

 

I hope this helps save some projects from being completely ripped out due to mistakes being found later.  We have all done it and lost projects that we tried to save.

Lifelines are truly a life saver!  And Betty Sue won’t be giving you that look…

Happy loom knitting!!

1 Comment

  • We’re writing to let you know of a new website that is launching in the coming weeks.

    http://www.k3tog.com

    We’re a knitting community hosting knit-a-longs, tutorials, patterns, and a community space for knitters to become friends and help one another (or vent as the situation calls for)

    We plan on featuring a knitter/designer a month and would love for you to contribute (a pattern, yarn, whatever you’d like!)

    We please ask if you could let your followers know we exist! It would be greatly appreciated.

    Looking forward to having you as a member of the k3tog community

    The k3tog team
    – Kendra and Sarah

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Oct 17, 2016

Loom FAQs: How do I decrease crowns of hats?

10940466_663261290449770_6723370072072730651_n

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the first things that people learn to knit on looms are hats.  But due to the nature of knitting looms, these hats are made as a tube then gathered at the top.  These hats are always bulky at the top due to the gathering.  I have seen people ask “how do I keep the tops from being too bulky?”  “Is there a way to decrease the top of a hat?”  “Can I make the hat top down like in needle patterns?”

So is there a way?  While there are some techniques that help keep the bulk of gathering a tube on a knitting loom, there is also a way to decrease the top of a hat so that the crown is smooth.

hat-decrease

Hat with decreased crown knit on the All-n-One loom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What loom can I use to decrease?

You will need an adjustable loom in order to decrease the top of a hat.  While it may be achieved by using various round looms, getting the peg count correct is the tricky part.  You need a loom that can adjust the exact number of pegs you need after each decrease round.

The All-n-One loom is one such loom.  The sliders make it easy to adjust to any peg count as you decrease.

Can I just start at the top of the hat and increase instead of decreasing?

Yes.  But I feel that decreasing is easier than increasing.  Therefore, I will demonstrate how to work a hat from the brim up then decrease the top.

Is it hard to decrease the top of a hat?

It really isn’t that hard to decrease on the All-n-One loom.  It does take a bit more effort and time to do it.  But that smooth crown is worth the effort.

How do I decrease?  

While there are various stitch counts and methods of decreasing a crown, there is one gradual decrease that I like best.

The decrease can be worked with a stitch count that is divisible by either 6 or 8.  While I prefer to work the gradual decrease when the stitch multiples are 8, a stitch count with a multiple of 6 can be done as well.  It is personal preference.  I will include instructions for both.

What does a multiple of 8 stitches mean?

If the total stitch count can be evenly divided by 8 then it is a multiple of 8.  Common hat sizes in small gauge using medium/worsted weight yarn that are multiples of 8 are 72 and 80 pegs for adults, 72 and 64 pegs for youth, 56 and 64 pegs for toddler/child, 48 and 56 pegs for baby.

Gradual Decrease

The loom will need to be adjusted down in size BEFORE each decrease round.

Remove the work by placing each stitch on a lifeline.  A lifeline is a piece of yarn that is about 40 inches for a hat that is in a contrasting color.  Run the lifeline through each stitch starting with peg 1 and ending with the last peg.  Then remove the work from the loom.

Adjust the loom to the smaller size.  Then place each stitch back on the loom following the row that you are on.  Place each stitch that is to be knitted one by one then placing 2 loops for the K2tog (knit 2 together).  Continue until all the loops are back on the loom.

When placing the stitches on the peg for the K2tog, always place the stitches in the same order.  If the stitches are not always placed on the peg in the same order, the decreases will not all slant in the same direction making the finished product not a clean looking.

Then work the round.

The loom can be adjusted with the work still on the loom.  If this is done, I would recommend using a yarn that has some stretch to it.  First you will need to move all the stitches for the K2tog.  Then start from the slider ends and move the stitches inward while moving the sliders to fill in the empty pegs.  If using stitch markers, they will need to be moved as well so that the k2tog will always happen in the same place each time.

The loom will be at the smallest before the last decrease round.  It will be fine to have the stitches every other peg for that last decrease round.  Just be sure and bring the working yarn behind the empty peg before working the next stitch.

The last rows will be worked in stockinette.

Here are the abbreviations.

K – knit

K2tog – knit 2 together

Rnd – round

Rep – repeat

Multiple of 8 Stitch Count Decrease

Start your decrease when you have 14 rounds left on your hat.

Rnd 1:  *K6, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 2:  K all

Rnd 3:  *K5, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 4:  K all

Rnd 5:  *K4, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 6:  K all

Rnd 7:  *K3, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 8:  K all

Rnd 9:  *K2, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 10:  K all

Rnd 11:  *K1, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 12:  K all

Rnd 13:  *K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 14:  K all

Gather remaining stitches and secure.

Multiple of 6 Stitch Count Decrease

Start your decrease when you have 10 rounds left on your hat.

Rnd 1:  *K4, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 2:  K all

Rnd 3:  *K3, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 4:  K all

Rnd 5:  *K2, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 6:  K all

Rnd 7:  *K1, K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 8:  K all

Rnd 9:  *K2tog, rep from * around

Rnd 10:  K all

Gather remaining stitches and secure.

hat-decrease-crown

 

 

Now you have a nicely domed crown for your lovely knitting hat!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Never be afraid of trying something new!  Enjoy the knit!

6 Comments

  • Thanks for the info! Can’t wait to try it with my next hat!

  • Hi I have a question on the k2tog say like example
    You knit 4 pegs then do you take one of the stitches
    From the next peg after you knit 4 and move it over to
    The next peg and then knit that peg and the keep repeating
    Knit4 the k2tog together to decrease and continue the the other
    Instructions as follow for each row I just get mixed up about the k2tog
    Thing

    Sherri Ristow

  • I am so glad you can decrease stitches by using your loom. I have avoided making hats because I didn’t like the tube style hats was all you can make. Now to find some patterns. Thank you for the tutorial.

  • How did you know I had been trying to figure this out?! Thank you so much for helping my brain. Now can you tell me how to increase.

  • Sherri,

    When you k2tog, you are literally knitting 2 stitches together. How you do that is, as in the first round of decreases that you mentioned, you knit the stitches on pegs 1 – 4. When you get to peg 5, you move the stitch from peg 6 to peg 5 so that there are 2 stitches on that peg and knit both loops over as one. If you are using the lifeline method to remove the hat, adjust the loom, and then replace the stitches, you will do as follows. After the hat is off the loom and the loom is adjusted to the smaller size, you will put the stitches back on pegs 1 – 4. Then you will place the next 2 loops on peg 5. Continue with the next 4 stitches on the next 4 pegs, pegs 6 – 9, and then 2 stitches on the 10th peg. Continue around the loom. After all the stitches are back on the loom, knit then entire round, treating the pegs with 2 loops as 1.

    I hope that helps clarify the k2tog for you.

    Renita

  • Thanks for this, I am going to give it a try. I have been making hats and have released the bulk at the end by making the last 8 rows an k3 p3 or k4 p4 repeat depending on the design multiples. and then cinch off the purls first then pick up the knits to finish off the closure.

    This style will be much nicer of a finish.

    Thanks again

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Sep 19, 2016

Loom FAQs: I Need to Crochet??

Loom FAQs

 

Crochet??  What??  I thought this was a loom knitting blog…  Fear not.  It is still a loom knitting blog.  And yes.  This is still a loom knitting article.

While I know that most people that loom knit do not know how to crochet, it has been brought to my attention recently that most loom knitters, especially beginners, find crochet borders on loom knit items as “deceptive” since it is a loom knit pattern.  And while these borders can be left off, it will not look like the picture.  Hmmm…  Never really thought if it as deceptive to have a crochet border on a loom knit project, but I can see where she was going with it.

Most loom knit patterns do not have anything crochet at all.  But occasionally there are.  And not everyone was a fortunate enough to have a grandmother to teach them to crochet like I was.

Of course, this would be the reason I see all those questions about how to make convert a certain crochet project to loom knit.  Which of course you can’t…  Please refer to my previous article on converting for more about that.  But even something like a crochet border is just as complicated as a complete crochet project to some.

On that note, I would like to do my best to help instruct loom knitters on how to crochet a border on a flat panel.

What do you mean by “flat panel”?

When you loom knit a blanket, dish cloth, or anything else that is not worked in the round like a hat, it is a flat panel.

Why would I need to crochet a border?

Borders are needed to keep pieces from curling if the project is all knit.  Crocheting a border onto a finished flat panel will help keep it from curling.  Not all flat panels need to have a crochet border though.  Borders can be created by changing the stitch pattern while working the piece.  You can find out more on that here.

Sometimes the edges are just ugly or do not match.  While there are ways to work the project so that all the edges match, sometimes it is preferable to just crochet a border instead.   You can learn more on making the edges match while knitting here.

How do I crochet a border?

While there are lots of ways to crochet a border, today I will only demonstrate how to work a single crochet border onto a flat panel in the interest of keeping it simple.

I have worked a simple small square in all knit or stockinette in pink.  I will be using red for the border.  This square was worked on the Hat Loom in small gauge using worsted/medium weight yarn.  I am using a US 7/4.5mm hook for the border.

How do I know what size hook to use?

The easiest way to know what size hook to use if the pattern doesn’t specify is to use the hook recommended on the label of the yarn you are using.  If you are using more than one strand of yarn to create a bulkier yarn, you can refer here to know what weight yarn it is equivalent to.

Here is a rough guide to what size hook to use with each yarn weight that is commonly used in loom knitting.

Yarn Weight            Crochet Hook Size (US/metric)

3/light, dk, sport              7  t0  I-9  /  4.5 – 5.5mm

4/worsted, aran                I-9  to  K-10 1/2  /  5.5 – 6.5mm

5/bulky, chunky               K-10 1/2  to  M-13  /  6.5 – 9mm

6/super bulky                   M-13  to  Q  /  9 – 15mm

7/jumbo                             Q and larger  /  15mm and larger

Or you can just use whatever size will easily fit in the stitches without forcing the hook through.  That is usually what I do…

What if I am left handed?

Simply work everything I show in the other direction.  I do realize that most left handed people can use their right hand just as well as the left.  My sister is one of them.  While she writes with her left hand, she loom knits and crochets with her right as well as lots of other everyday activities with her right hand instead of her left.

Where and how do I join the yarn onto the piece?

You can join the yarn anywhere you like.  I prefer to join at the top right corner in the stitch next to the corner so that the last thing worked is the corner.

2-first-stitch

 

To do this, hold the project with the right side facing you.  I have worked a small flat panel with an e-wrap cast on and a basic bind off.  I am holding the bind off edge at the top.  You can use the cast on edge if you prefer.

I am pointing to the first stitch at the corner with my hook.

 

 

 

 

1-slip-knot-on-hook

 

First make a slip knot and place on the hook.

 

 

 

 

3-second-stitch

 

 

 

 

Insert the hook into the second stitch.

 

 

 

Join the yarn with a slip stitch by doing the following:

 

4-yo

 

 

Yarn over by hooking the working yarn with the crochet hook.

 

 

 

5-pull-loop-through

 

 

Pull working yarn through the stitch.

 

 

 

 

6-pull-loop-through-slip-knot

 

 

Then pull it again through the slip knot.

 

 

 

 

7-snug-up-tail

 

 

Pull on the tail to snug up the joining slip stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

Now the yarn is joined to the piece, and you are ready to start your border.

How do I work the single crochet stitch?

8-work-in-tail

 

Before starting, you can hide your tail from your panel by bringing it across the edge and working the crochet stitches over the tail.  This is optional.  Just one less tail to weave in if you do.

 

 

Now you are ready to chain 1.  You must do this in order for the single crochet stitch to stand  up.

9-yo-for-chain

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

 

10-chain-1

 

 

Pull through the loop on the hook.

Chain 1 complete!

 

 

 

 

Now for the first single crochet stitch.

11-insert-in-same-stitch

 

 

Insert hook in same stitch as the join.

 

 

 

 

12-yo

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

 

13-pull-loop-through

 

 

Pull through the stitch so that there are now 2 loops on the hook.

 

 

 

 

14-yo

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

15-pull-through-both-loops

 

 

Pull loop through both loops on the hook.

Single crochet stitch complete!

 

 

 

16-insert-hook-next-stitch

 

 

Now you are ready to insert the hook into the next stitch and repeat the instructions for the single crochet stitch until you get to the corner stitch.

 

 

 

Where do I insert the hook for each stitch?

On the cast on and bind off edges, each crochet stitch goes into each stitch as you go since the size of the crochet hook should match the gauge of the knitted piece.  Those 2 edges are the easy ones.

The sides are a different story though.  When you look at a swatch gauge, there are more rows in an inch than there are stitches.  When working a crochet border, you need to take care that you do not work too many stitches or not enough stitches.

How will I know how where to put the stitches on the sides?  To be honest, it’s a guessing a game for the most part.

 

What happens if I do not space my crochet stitches evenly?

While working across the cast on and bind off edges is stitch for stitch as mentioned before, the sides is where a person can mess up the border by not having the stitches spaced evenly.

If you work too many stitches, the edge will ruffle like this.

too-many-stitches

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you do not work enough stitches, the body of the project will gather with the edge being too tight like this.

not-enough-stitches

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you use too many or not enough stitches on the edges, blocking will not fix it.  You will need to take the stitches back out and try again.

 

What do I do at the corners?

Corners need extra stitches so that the border will lay flat.  Each corner stitch requires 3 stitches of single crochet in the same stitch on each round.

17-corner-stitch

 

When the corner is reached,

 

 

 

 

18-first-stitch-in-corner

 

work the first single crochet in the corner.

 

 

 

 

 

Then work 2 more in the same place.

 

22-three-stitches-in-corner

 

All 3 stitches in one stitch will look like this.

 

 

 

 

23-next-stitch-in-side

 

Then continue on with the next side.

 

 

 

 

 

Repeat the 3 stitches in one space at each corner.  The last corner should be your last stitch.  You will join the round after the last corner.  How you join will depend on if you are only doing 1 round or continuing with another round.

What if I want to work more than one round?

If working more than one round of single crochet for the border, you will need to join the first round with a slip stitch.

 

28-slip-stitch

 

 

When you reach the first stitch, place your hook through the top of that stitch.

 

 

 

 

29-yo-for-slip-stitch

 

 

Yarn over.

 

 

 

 

30-pull-through-stitch-and-loop-on-hook

 

 

Then pull the working yarn through the stitch as well as the loop on the hook to complete the slip stitch.

 

 

 

31-chain-1

 

 

Then chain 1 and start the next round in the stitch where you joined.

 

 

 

 

 

Continue as before until you get to the corner.

Work a single crochet stitch in the first corner stitch in the row below.

Place the 3 single crochet stitches in the middle stitch of the 3 at the corner on the round below.

Then work a single crochet stitch in the last corner stitch of the row below.

 

34-three-stitches-in-middle-stitch-for-corner

 

 

Now you have worked your corner.  Continue as before.

 

 

 

 

How do I finish so the join is not seen?

After completing the last stitch, do not join with the slip stitch.

 

36-cut-working-yarn-remove-hook

 

Cut the working yarn with a tail long enough to weave in and thread it onto a tapestry needle.

 

 

 

37-thread-tapestry-needle

 

 

Thread tail on tapestry needle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

38-insert-tapestry-needle-in-loop

 

 

Thread needle through the loop in the direction you were working.  Since I was working right to left, I inserted the needle into the loop from the right side of the loop to the left.  Pull the yarn through.

 

 

 

 

39-insert-needle-through-next-stitch

 

 

Run the needle through the stitch you are joining from the back of the work to the front making sure you catch the entire stitch so it will look like the needle is under 2 strands of yarn.  Pull yarn through.

 

 

 

40-insert-back-through-loop

 

Run the needle back through the last loop in the opposite direction than you did the first time.  For me, I went from left to right making sure the needle came out the back of the work.

Pull the yarn through.

 

 

 

41-finished-join

 

Now you are ready to weave in that last end for a nice seamless join.

 

 

 

 

 

 

finished-border

 

Crochet border complete!

While you can see the other color between the stitches on the sides, this will not happen when using the same color for the border.

Blocking will also help even out those stitches as well.

 

 

 

 

While the majority of loom knitting patterns do not require any crochet knowledge at all, some do.  A person does not need to proficient in crochet in order to work a simple border in crochet.  But once you learn, you may be hooked!  I find a mixture of loom knitting and crochet a fun and satisfying project.  Brings together 2 of my favorite things.

Hope this helps!  Happy loom knitting as well as crocheting!

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Jun 20, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Are Selvages?

Loom FAQs

 

 

 

 

One of the most commonly questioned topics in loom knitting is edges.  How do I get my edges to match?  How do I keep my edges from curling?  How do I make pretty edges??  

While there are are different ways to keep those edges clean and pretty (some of these ways are discussed in Loom FAQs:  To Slip or Not To Slip?  and Loom FAQs:  Why Do Knits Curl?), there is one word that popped up that I never associated with knitting.  Only with sewing.  And that word is “selvage”.

So let’s talk edges and what they have to with a selvage.

What is a selvage?

A selvage is the edge of a woven fabric that will not unravel.  It is different from the rest of the fabric making a narrow border.  Usually is it a bit thicker than the fabric itself.

While most people are familiar with the selvages on fabric in sewing, a selvage can be knit on the edges of any flat panel project creating a nice, clean, slightly thicker edge.

The word selvage comes from the combining of the words “self” and “edge”.  The word originates in late Middle English of the mid 1400’s.

How do I work a selvage in knitting on a loom?

There are 2 different selvages that we will discuss:  double selvage and triple selvage.  Either one can be worked with any stitch pattern.  I will show each selvage on stockinette and on garter stitch.

Sometime this method is called an i-cord edge.

Each method is worked over 2 rows and repeated for the entire project.

Each method will be written first then demonstrated with pictures.

Before we get started, please do not read the written and think it is too hard.  Nothing is too hard.  Please remember that you just need to sit down and work it stitch by stitch.  Do not let the abbreviations intimidate you.  YOU CAN DO THIS!  I believe in you.

Abbreviations for written instructions:

k:  knit

p:  purl

s:  slip/skip

wyif:  working yarn in front

wyib:  working yarn in back

st(s):  stitch(es)

Double Selvage

Double selvage with stockinette stitch – front

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double selvage stockinette stitch - back

Double selvage stockinette stitch – back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double selvage with garter stitch body

Double selvage with garter stitch body

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When working the double selvage on a flat panel, you will need to add 4 stitches to whatever stitch pattern you will be working, 2 for each side.

Written Instructions:

Row 1:  s1 wyib, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 2 pegs), s1 wyib, p1

Row 2:  s1 wyif, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 2 pegs), s1 wyib, k1

Repeat rows 1 – 2 for the length of the project.

 

Now for some photos…

Row 1:

sl1wyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

knit peg 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2:  knit the stitch on the peg

 

Work desired stitch pattern until last 2 pegs.

 

slwyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg:  slip stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch unworked

 

purl last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg:  purl the stitch on the peg

 

Row 2:

sl1wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1 on row 2:  slip stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bringing the working yarn in front of the work, and replacing the loop back onto the peg.

 

knit next to last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2 on row 2:  knit the stitch

Work desired stitch pattern until last 2 pegs.

slwyib row 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg on row 2:  slip stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

knit last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg on row 2:  knit the stitch

 

Repeat rows 1 and 2 for the entire project.

 

Triple Selvage

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch – front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch - back

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch – back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triple selvage with garter stitch

Triple selvage with garter stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When working the triple selvage on a flat panel, you will need to add 6 stitches to whatever stitch pattern you will be working, 3 for each side.

Written Instructions:

Row 1:  s1 wyib, s1 wyif, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 3 pegs), k1, s1 wyif, p1

Row 2:  s1 wyif, p1, s1 wyib, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 3 pegs), s1 wyib, p1, k1

 

Now for some photos…

Row 1:

sl1wyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

peg 2 sl wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

knit peg 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 3:  knit the stitch

Continue with desired stitch pattern for the body of the work until the last 3 pegs.

 

2nd to last peg:  Knit stitch on peg (not shown)

 

slwyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

purl last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg:  Purl the stitch on the peg.

 

Row 2:

 

sl1wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1 on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

purl peg 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2 on row 2:  Purl stitch on peg.

 

sl back 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 3 on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

Continue with desired stitch pattern until the last 3 stitches.

 

slip back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd to last peg on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

purl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg on row 2:  purl stitch on peg

 

knit last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg on row 2:  knit stitch on peg

 

Repeat rows 1 and 2 for the entire project.

 

For those of you who like to find the patterns in life like I do, here is something that may help.

For the pegs that have knit stitches, the slipped stitch is in the back on the next row.

For the pegs that have purl stitches, the slipped stitch is in the front on the next row.

This is for the selvage only.  This will not apply for whatever stitch pattern used for the body of the work.

 

Well I hope you are as excited about selvages as I am!  Happy loom knitting!

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Jun 20, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?

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Socks are a project that is intimidating even to the most experienced knitter.  I never had the desire to even knit my own socks although I knew all the techniques used except for the Kitchener stitch to seam to the toe.  THAT is what intimidated me more than anything.  But questions are asked often regarding loom knitting socks.  How do I knit sock on a loom?  What loom is best for knitting socks with sock yarn?  How do I keep my stitches from getting too tight?  How do I keep from having holes when working short rows on the heel and toe?  With all those questions and more, let’s talk socks!

I have recently started knitting my own socks.  AND I LOVE IT!!  Completely surprised me how much I have enjoyed knitting my own socks on the extra fine gauge sock loom.  And now I would love to share with you some things I have learned along the way.

Why would I want to knit my own socks when I can buy them?

While it is easier and cheaper to buy socks, you don’t have that same sense of accomplishment and pride as when you make your own socks.

Are socks hard?

Not as hard as you might think.  Socks are fun to make.  While there are lots of different patterns out there and the combination of stitch patterns, cuff, toe, and heel types are limitless, the basic sock itself is really not that hard.  There are only 4 techniques you really need to get started making your own socks.  Knit and purl stitches, short row shaping using the wrap and turn technique for the heel and toe, and closing the toe with the Kitchener stitch.

What kind of yarn do I use for socks?

You need to use the yarn that is best suited for the type of socks you are making and the type of loom.  You will want to use a wool blend yarn.

Yarn that is labeled as sock yarn is a 1 weight yarn.  It usually has a fiber content of 75% superwash wool and 25% nylon.  Why?  This blend of yarn helps give the sock memory when it gets wet.  There are some brands that do make a wool-free sock yarn for those that are wool sensitive.

What is superwash wool, and why is it different than plain wool?

Superwash wool will not shrink or felt when washed in warm or hot water.  This yarn is machine washable.  While most superwash yarn says it can be dried in the clothes dryer, I prefer to just shape my socks and let them air dry on a towel.

Do I need a sock loom to make socks?

No.  You can use any loom as long as you can get the fit you need.  I will say this though.  If you are wanting to make socks to wear with shoes, you will need to use sock yarn on a fine or extra fine gauge loom.  The larger the weight of yarn you use, the thicker the sock will be.  Worsted weight and bulky yarns make wonderful slipper socks to wear around the house.

I will also warn you that not all companies that make looms use the same terminology for loom gauge since there are no universal guidelines set up for this.  It gets confusing for people, when new looms come out , when the looms are listed as fine gauge when another company that has been making them for years has that same gauge loom listed as small gauge.  You can refresh your memory on loom gauge in Loom FAQs:  What is gauge?

Is there only 1 way to work a sock?

No there isn’t.  A sock can be worked from toe up where you start at the the toe and work work your way up to the cuff or from top down where you start with the cuff and work down.

What are the parts of the sock?

There are 5 parts to a sock.

Cuff – This is the top of the sock.  Most patterns use a 2×2 ribbing for the cuff since it has the most stretch and helps keep the sock from falling down the leg.

Leg – This is between the cuff and the heel.  It can be any length and any stitch pattern preferred.  I love to wear ankle socks so I only work about an inch and a half between the cuff and the heel.  Different people like different heights of socks.  The leg part of the sock is where you make the height of your sock to your liking.

Heel – This is the part between the leg and foot.  Tube socks won’t have a heel so they will bunch up in front of the ankle.  Turning the heel will give the sock shape so it will be no bunching at all.

Foot –  The foot is between the heel and the toe.  Seems a bit obvious…  But still.  There are actually 2 parts of the the foot.  The top half of the foot is the instep.  Lots of patterns will work the instep in the same stitch pattern as the leg.  The bottom half of the foot is the sole.  It is almost always worked in stockinette or plain knit stitch so it’s more comfortable to walk in.

Toe –  The toe of the sock is just that:  The part where the toes fit.  It is shaped so that there is not extra knitted fabric around the toes.

How many ways are there to turn a heel or work the toe?

I know of at least 16 ways to turn a heel.  There are probably more.  And almost as many ways to shape the toe.  Everyone has their favorite way to work the heel and toe.

What does it mean to “turn” the heel?  This just refers to the way the heel is worked to cause the heel to bend into the shape of the sock.

Which knit stitch do I use?

It depends on which gauge you are using.  The finer the gauge, the harder it is to use the true knit stitch.  Lots of people do use the flat knit for fine and extra fine gauge socks since it’s less time consuming.

I do NOT recommend e-wrap knit at all for socks of any kind.  I do know lots of people do for slipper socks on large gauge looms.  But you must remember that when you use e-wrap knit while working in the round, the twist of the stitch while going in the same direction each round will cause a laddering effect between the columns of stitches.

What is laddering?  This is when you can see a bar of yarn between each stitch instead of each stitch sitting nicely side by side.  You can learn more about that in Loom FAQs:  What is Laddering?.

For more information on the different knit stitches and how they are worked on the loom, please refer to Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch??

How do I keep my stitches from getting too tight?

This is very common when using the flat knit or even the u-wrap knit stitches.  Here is how I keep my stitches from getting too tight while using the flat knit stitch while making socks.

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I hold the working yarn taunt across the front of the pegs so that the yarn is not pulled over the peg with the loop I am knitting over.

 

 

 

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When I pull the loop over the top of the peg, I let go of the working yarn and gently pull back on the loop to the middle of the loom causing the stitch to loosen.

 

 

Even if you loosen the flat knit stitch, it is still the flat knit.  It is the method of carrying the yarn across the front of the pegs instead of wrapping it around the peg that makes it the flat knit.  You are just controlling the tension by loosening each stitch as you go to keep it from being too tight.

How many pegs do I use?

The number of pegs depends on which loom you are using.  If you are using one of the KB sock looms, the instructions that came with the loom includes how to measure the foot to determine how many pegs.

Otherwise math is involved more heavily…  And working a swatch…  All those evil things that make me laugh like a mad scientist…

Um huh…  Pardon me for getting distracted.  Back to calculating peg count.

First you will need to work a dreaded swatch for a stitch count.  If you need a refresher course on working a swatch, you can find it about the middle of Loom FAQs:  What is Gauge?

Once you find how many stitches per inch you get with your yarn on the loom you are going to use, you need to measure your foot or the foot intended for the sock.  Using a sewing tape measure, wrap the tape around the ball of the foot at the widest part.  Do not squeeze it tight.  Take that measurement in inches and subtract 15% of that measurement.  This is what is called negative ease.   Otherwise the sock will be too big.  If you multiply the number of inches by .85, you will get the same answer as if multiplying the measurement by .15 and subtracting that number from the original measurement.  What???  Give me a bit and I will put into an equation…

Now multiple that number by the number of stitches you got in an inch with your swatch.  That is the number of pegs you will need to cast on.

Now to put that into the equation.

A = measurement of foot around the ball in inches

B = number of stitches in an inch from the swatch

A  x  .85  x  B = number of pegs to cast on

Is there a formula to making socks?

Oh!  I am so happy you asked!  I love formulas.  I love math.  I think you know this by now unless you are new to reading my articles.  For those who keep saying that they never use algebra as an adult, I will talk to you later….

YES!  There is a formula for making socks on any loom.  I will go through the process of working top down.

First of all, you will need to know which loom you want to use depending on yarn weight.  Please refer the previous section on peg count to calculate the number of pegs you will need to knit a sock to fit the foot you desire to sheathe.

Which peg is the first peg?

When working on any loom, you need to decide which peg is first.  It really doesn’t matter.  Just so long as you mark it and use that peg as peg 1 throughout the pattern.  When using any of the adjustable sock looms, I always use the peg on the side next to the slider.  This is how I know I have finished a round after working the pegs on the slider.  It also makes it easier to know where the 2 halves of the loom are.

Now you are ready to cast on.  I would recommend casting on with a method that will stretch and work well with ribbing.  I like using the YO cast on.  This method gives the stretch needed without the need to tighten up the cast on when using the e-wrap cast on.  Some people refer to the YO (yarn over) cast on as the double e-wrap cast on.

Now you are ready to work the cuff.  Work the cuff in whatever method desired.  There are several different cuffs depending on what look you are going for.  Most common is the 2×2 ribbing.  It has the best elasticity to help keep those socks from sagging.

On to the leg, work it in any stitch pattern you desire for whatever length you desire.   It is your sock after all.

Now for the heel,  this is where the math come into play.

Formula for working a short row heel on any loom

While there are numerous ways to work a heel, I will be only instructing you on how to work the short row heel so that this article won’t run on for days.

First the loom will need to be divided into half.  Divide the total peg count by 2.

# of pegs / 2 = half the peg count

13499860_10209059107769952_2107441800_oThe first peg to the middle is the the pegs the heel will be worked over.  As the foot is worked, these are the pegs that are the sole.

 

 

Peg 1 on this loom is marked with the green stitch marker on the right.

The last peg of the first half is on the left marked with the purple stitch marker.

While you work the heel, the other half of the pegs from the middle to the last peg are left unworked.  These pegs are the stitches that are the instep on the foot section of the sock.

To work a short row heel, the half of the loom you are working over needs to first be divided into thirds.  It will not always be divisible by 3.  If this is the case, you will either have 1 section that has either 1 peg more than the other 2 sections or 1 less peg than the other 2 sections.  This section will always be the middle third of the heel.

Either mark the loom or keep up with the rows.

Since you will be working a flat panel now, you will need to do a wrap and turn at the end of each short row.  If you don’t do this, you will have a holes where you start back in the other direction.

Wrap & Turn 

Wrap and turns are abbreviated in patterns as W&T.

Work the first short row in knit until you reach the last peg of the heel portion.  This is how you work a W&T:

1

 

 

Holding the yarn to the side of the peg that the working yarn is on,

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

lift the loop off the peg.

Bring the working yarn behind the peg in front of the loop to the other side of the peg.

 

 

 

4

 

 

Place the loop back on the peg bringing the working yarn around front of the peg.

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

Knit the next peg leaving 2 loops on the wrapped peg.

 

 

 

 

Continue back to the first peg.

1

 

 

 

Wrap the first peg in the same manner as before

 

 

 

2

 

 

by lifting the loop off the peg

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

bringing the working yarn behind the peg and placing the loop back on the peg.

 

 

 

 

Knit back until you reach the peg next to the wrapped peg and wrap that peg.

Continue going back and forth wrapping the next peg over until 1/3 of the pegs are wrapped on each side leaving the middle pegs unwrapped.

1

 

 

 

 

Now to work your way back out…

2

 

Knit until you reach the first peg with 2 wraps.

 

 

1

 

 

Knit both loops over.

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

Wrap and turn on the next peg by lifting both loops and placing the wrap under them.  Be careful that both loops are placed back on the peg over the wrap.

 

 

 

4

 

 

Now you have 3 loops on that peg.

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

Knit back again repeating the W&Ts until all the pegs have been worked leaving 3 wraps on the first and the last of the first half of the pegs.

 

 

On the first round of the foot, you will start with peg 2 after completing the W&T on peg 1.  When you reach the last peg of the first half that has 3 loops on it, knit over all 3 together and continue on the instep side.  When peg 1 is reached again, knit over all 3 loops together.

Do I need to lift the top loop for the W&T?

Some people prefer not to lift the loop and just wrap the peg above the loop.  This does create a more seamless join.  But it does leave holes.  Also it will put those wraps on the inside of the sock creating a seam that can be irritating to the heels and toes.

Continuing on…

After the heel, the instep and sole of the foot is worked.  The first half of the stitches will be the sole and is usually just worked in stockinette.  The second half of the stitches is the instep.  Usually the stitch pattern used for the leg is continued on the instep half of the stitches.

Measure the foot you are fitting from the back of the heel to the end of the longest toe.  Then subtract 1.5″ or 2″ (depending on how snug you like your socks) from that length.  Work the foot until the foot measures the length just calculated from the heel.  I usually just stick a ruler into my sock with the end at the heel and measure at the short end of the sock loom.  Despite the work still being stretched out on the pegs, this method of measuring is fairly accurate.

Then work the toe.  Use whichever toe method preferred.  I use the short row that is the exact same as the heel.  If you prefer the seam to be on top of the toes, work the short rows over the first half of the stitches exactly like the heel was worked.  If you want the seam under the toes, knit the first half of the stitches then work the toe on the second half of the pegs.

Does the Kitchener Stitch require knowing how to needle knit?

No it doesn’t.  Only thing the needles are used for if to hold the stitches.  You actually use a tapestry needle to sew the loops together to create a seamless join.

What does DPN mean?

DPN knitting needles are what is used for the Kitchener stitch.  DPN stands for Double Point Needles.  These needles have points are both ends and are used in needle knitting to knit in the round.  These needles are sold in sets of 5.  You will only need 2.

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What size DPNs do I use?

I recommend using the next size needle down from the needle equivalent to the loom gauge you are using to make your socks.  You can find the rough needle equivalents close to the end of my article Loom FAQs:  How Do I Convert?

What exactly is the Kitchener Stitch and what does it have to do with kitchens??

The Kitchener stitch is a method of joining or grafting 2 rows of live stitches in a nice seamless manner using the working yarn on a tapestry needle.  And it has nothing to do with kitchens…

Why is it called Kitchener stitch?

Well history has it that an Englishman by the name Horatio Herbert Kitchener, First Earl of Kitchener of Khartoum, developed the seamless graphing join during World War I to prevent the damage done to the soldiers feet because of the seam on the toes.

While this is when this technique first came into being and while Lord Kitchener did head up the campaign of getting women in Britain, America, and Canada to knit comfort items from a booklet of patterns during WWI that included socks using the seamless join, there is actually no concrete evidence that he actually developed the seamless join himself.  But it was named after him, and he will forever be joined to the knitting community.  Way to go, Lord Kitchener!

How is the correct way to load the stitches onto the needles?

The stitches do need to be loaded or put on the double point needles in a certain manner, or the join will not be seamless.

1

 

 

Start loading the stitches from the last stitch on the first half and work back to the first stitch.

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

Lift the stitch off the peg and put it on the DPN by running the needle from the front of the stitch to the back.

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

Then repeat that with the next stitch working back to the first peg until all the stitches on the first half of the loom are on the needle.

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

Now all the stitch on the first half of the loom are on the needle.

 

 

 

5

 

 

Then repeat on the second half of the stitch by starting with the last peg and working back to the first peg of the second half.

 

 

 

 

6

 

All stitches are on 2 DPNs with the working yarn on the right.  The first half of the stitches are the needle closest to you or the front needle.  The last half of the stitches are on the back needle.

 

 

 

If you are left handed or just work in the opposite direction, just reverse what I did.

Do I have to use needles to close the toe for the Kitchener Stitch?

No.  There is a way to work the Kitchener stitch while the stitches are still on the loom.  While I prefer to use the needles to hold my stitches while I work the seam, it can be done on the loom.

Currently there is a video out there that demonstrates how to do the Kitchener stitch on the loom.  I find it confusing since none of the stitches are removed as you go making it harder to see where you are and easier to miss a stitch.

I have come up with a way to use the loom to work the Kitchener stitch in the same manner as using needles where the stitches are removed as you go.  This makes it easier to see if all the stitches are being worked in order, and none are being skipped.

How do I set up the loom for the Kitchener stitch?

To work the Kitchener stitch on the loom, you will need to move the first half of the stitches over onto the second half of the pegs.  This way the first half of the stitches are sitting on the pegs above the second half of the stitches.

 

4

 

Load all the stitch from the first half onto something to hold them.  I use a DPN.  You can use a stitch holder or even a yarn lifeline.

 

 

Now move them over to the other side of the loom.

2

 

 

Place the each stitch onto the peg on the opposite side.

 

 

 

 

3

 

Continue with each stitch making sure the stitches are not twisted until all the stitches from the first half are on the pegs from the second half.

 

 

 

4

 

All stitches are on the same side of the loom.

 

 

 

5

 

In order for the Kitchener stitch to be worked on the loom exactly like it’s work on needles, the loom needs to turned upside down so the first half of the stitches is closest to you and the last half of the stitches are further from you.  The working yarn on the right.

 

How do I work the Kitchener stitch?

Now let me show you how to work the Kitchener stitch on needles AND the loom.  I will show the same thing on the needle first then show how on the loom.

When working the Kitchener stitch, whether on the loom or needles, each stitch must be worked twice in the opposite direction in order for the join to be seamless.  Now let’s get started.

Let’s first discuss what the terms “as if to knit” and “as if to purl” means.  This is the direction the yarn will be threaded through the stitch.

1

On needles, “as if to knit” means to run the tapestry needle through the stitch from the left to the back of the stitch.

2

On the loom, “as if to knit” means to run the tapestry needle through the stitch from the top of the peg to the bottom.

3

On needles, “as if to purl” means to run the tapestry needle from the right through the stitch to the front.

4

On the loom, “as if to purl” means to run the tapestry needle through the stitch from the bottom of the peg to the top.

Now to start the Kitchener stitch:

6

The front stitch is on the needle closest to you.

The back stitch is on the needle at the back.

5

The front stitch is the stitch at the end of the peg closest to you.

The back stitch is the stitch at the bottom of the peg.

To set up, insert the tapestry needle as if to purl on the front stitch.  Pull the working yarn completely through the stitch pulling snug.  Leave the stitch on the needle or peg.

3

From right to left.

4

From bottom to top.

Then insert the tapestry needle as if to knit on the back stitch pulling the working yarn snugly all the way through the stitch.  Leave the stitch on the needle or peg.

1

From left to right.

2

From top to bottom.

Now to actually start removing stitches from the needle or loom as the Kitchener stitch is worked.

Insert the tapestry needle as if to knit  through the front stitch REMOVING that stitch from the needle or peg as the working yarn is pulled all the way through the stitch that is removed.  Be careful not to pull the neighboring stitch off the needle or peg.

1

From left to right.

2

From top to bottom.

Now insert the tapestry needle as if to purl on the next stitch on the front LEAVING the stitch on the needle or peg pulling the working yarn all the way through.  Do not get the working yarn twisted around the needle or peg.

3

From right to left.

2

From bottom to top.

Now we will work the stitches on the back.

Insert the tapestry needle as if to purl in the stitch on the back REMOVING the stitch from the needle or peg and pulling the yarn snugly through the stitch.

1

From right to left.

2

From bottom to top.

Now insert the tapestry needle as if to knit in the stitch on the back LEAVING the stitch on the peg while pulling the working yarn snugly though the stitch.

3

From left to right.

4

From top to bottom.

Now you can see how 2 stitches are worked on the front removing the first but leaving the second then working 2 stitches on the back in the opposite way removing the first but leaving the second.

Here is how I keep up in my head as I work the stitches.

Front:  as if to knit, remove the stitch, as if to purl, leave the stitch

Back:  as if to purl, remove the stitch, as if to knit, leave the stitch

Then repeat.  Over and over and over…

5

You can see how the seamless grafting is looking as I go.

Continue in this manner until there is only 1 stitch each left on the front and back.

Insert the tapestry needle into the front stitch as if to knit REMOVING the stitch while pulling the working yarn snug.

1

From left to right.

2

From top to bottom.

Insert the tapestry need into the back stitch (only stitch left) as if to purl REMOVING the stitch while pulling the working yarn snug.

3

From right to left.

4

From bottom to top.

Look how pretty!!

5

Now there is what seems to be a rather large loop left.

6

Just run the tapestry needle through the the last stitch into the middle of the sock pulling that loop through and weave in the end.

7

Whew!!!  That is a lot to cover for something that only covers feet….  Once you make that first pair, there will be no stopping you!  Do not be afraid to try different heel and toe methods.  Different ways will fit differently.  Each foot is unique so our socks should be just as unique as our feet.  Best to have unique socks is to knit those unique socks ourselves!

As always, I hope this helps.  Happy sock loom knitting!

1 Comment

  • The wrap and turn was always my least favorite part of looming socks – sometimes I would lose my loop – especially when doing the increase and you have to be sure to get two loops back on the peg – the yarn is so tiny! ? I have come up with a solution that makes it unnecessary to lift your loops but still gets the turn beneath the existing loop. Sounds like magic, but it’s not. The idea came to me one time when I messed up a purl. So, you hold your working yarn beneath the existing loop. Then, as if to purl, put you loom hook down thru the existing loop and grab the working yarn. Up to this point it’s just like a purl. But now, instead of slipping off the existing loop, simply slip the working yarn over the peg. Ta da!! Now your working yarn is beneath the existing loop and you can turn and go back. I hope I explained that well. But that little trick totally takes the dread out of looming heels and toes. Enjoy!

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Jun 3, 2016

Double Knit 101-Part IV

Change of Color with Stripes and Design

There are many patterns in our free pattern library that incorporate stripes and fun intarsia designs.  Here are a few designs that you may recognize from our afghan patterns.  Let’s go over the basics in working with color changes and creating designs.

EXAMPLES OF CHANGE OF COLOR

Crayon Box Throw uses basic horizontal stripes.  These can be worked in any amount of rows, which will determine how thick the stripe will be.  The colors begin at start of a row and go to the end of the row.  Horizontal stripes can also be used to create a border at bottom and top of the knitted piece.

Vertical stripes are a bit different in that they are created with selected stitches and repeated on the same pins in each row.  With each row, the stripe grows longer.

They can also be used in just a few rows to create checker board designs.

painted_desert2__35124.1419381330.1280.1280

 

 

Painted Desert Afghan, uses vertical and horizontal stripes for the 2 color design and the border.  We used wide stripes to create the side panels.  The 3 panels were sewn together with the invisible stitch.

Checkerboard is created with vertical stripes for several rows and groups of stitches in one color, and then, by shifting the rows to different stitches,  for  several additional rows.  They can be created with just 2 colors or many.  If you are just exploring this concept, I would suggest starting with just a couple colors.  Tangled yarns can be frustrating-but we can talk about ways to assist with this when we start Intarsia                                                         .

afghan_new_daisyc__80278.1456511116.1280.1280

 

When we designed this large afghan, the New Daisy Afghan , we used a 2 color design by adding colors into the knit creating intarsia flowers.  The 2 color side panels were knit separately and all three strips were sewn together using invisible stitch.

 

 

chickie_blanket__89902.1419908673.1280.1280

 

In our Little Chickie Blanket, you can see how colors are used within the knit to create the ‘Chickie’.  Also vertical and horizontal stripes are used for the letters and the 2-tone stripe section.  This little blanket was knit is 3 strips, but the change of colors makes it look like squares.  The border was added as a separate piece and sewn on using invisible stitch.  This sewing stitch is illustrated in Part III tutorial.

 

 

INTARSIA

So what does ‘Intarsia’ really mean? According to wikipedia, it means a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colors.  In single knit, the main color is traditionally dropped behind the peg of a different color as in a slip stitch.  So at end of color design, the backside is a maze of yarn colors.  In double knit, its a bit different as the color changes are made between the 2 rows of stitches, so they are most often not seen;  but, the really great thing about double knit, is that the color design is seen on both sides.  This is why double knit intarsia afghans and scarves are so beautiful.

Basic Horizontal Stripe: We are working with blue and want to create a white stripe.  Pull the white thru the 3rd stitch in center of loom, just under the last row.  Keep the blue yarn attached as we will only make the white stripe about 3 rows wide.  Then we will continue with the blue again.  You will see in the photos that the blue yarn is moved slightly with each row, so it doesn’t get caught up in the white row.

tie to 3rd stitch

tie and lay yarn down

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

weave the white row

Work 3 rows with white yarn.  Once complete, lay white aside and work rows with the blue.  By keeping both yarns attached, we will be ready when we want to start some vertical stripes.  If you plan to do more than 3 or 4 rows of a color stripe, it may be best to cut the blue, tie white to blue at 3rd stitch, and then work with new color.  Then lay both yarn tails down and continue.

Once you weave and hook over the desired number of rows with the white stripe, lay the white aside and continue with the blue yarn.

new row of blue on white

Continue with the blue knit for as many rows as desired, and maybe change back to the white for another stripe, or maybe tie in another new color.

For now, let’s work 2 rows of the blue.  Keep both colors attached, because from here, we will be able to go right into some vertical stripes.

checkerboard

Here is an example of a scarf with horizontal, vertical, and checkerboard.

In this scarf, it is the same process as with the blue and white yarns.  We have blue knit with a 3 row white stripe, and then 2 rows of blue.  Now, let’s create vertical stripes to match the vertical stripes in the Checkerboard Scarf.

Vertical Stripes: Start vertical stripes by weaving the blue around 2 stitches, skip 2 stitches, blue for 2 stitches, skip 2 stitches, and continue to  the end of the piece.  See below example of full circular.  The row is worked in stockinette stitch, skipping the pegs where the white yarn will be worked in. The white yarn will fill in the stitches that were skipped.

start of verticle

 

full weave of vertical

 

 

 

 

Now add the white yarn in stockinette stitch.

You can see the previous row is already done.  By repeating this row with both colors, you will have vertical stripes growing with the knit.

 

white stripe:blue:verticle

 

 

Now, you may be wondering if we could do these vertical stripes with the white yarn in b/b stitch (back to back weaving).  When you are working only 2 stitches of a color, that is a good option also.  Or you may work the blue in b/b, and then weave the white in stockinette.  I think you are beginning to see how this can be expanded into multiple color designs.

 

checkerboard with knit

 

 

Checkerboard Design:

To create a checkerboard design, work the vertical stripe like above for 3 or 4 rows, the white loops over white, and blue over blue. Then alternate colors.  Now do 3 or 4 rows of blue where the white stitches were, and the white where the blue ones were.  See photo.  This will shift the vertical stripes into checkerboard like on the brown scarf above.  But lets look at how the weave will be different if we use some b/b stitches for clarity.

bb white w:blu

 

As you can see, the white stitches in back/back stitch look pretty much the same as stockinette only a little looser.

The best time to use the b/b weaving is within a piece of knit creating a small design.

Weave the white over b/b, 2 stitches, move across to next white stitches until all white stitches are covered.

b:b 2

Weave over the white stitches in stockinette in blue for a  full circular so that all pegs are covered.  Hook over.  Repeat.  Remember in doing any design, be sure to cast on amount of stitches to complete the sequence.  Here, we just want even amount of stitches, so the 2-stitch vertical stripe or checkerboard design comes out even.

blue over bb1

compkete blue over bb

 

 

 

 

 

 

When doing a knitted piece with a small design in it, you will tie on the color of design, close to where the stitches begin.  Work the color stitches in that row in b/b stitch.  Lay yarn down, and pick up main color and work in stockinette stitch. Work each row, one at a time, using the color sts when required keeping the yarn attached until the design is complete.  Tie to working yarn and cut. Weave in the color yarn tail.

We will dive into intarsia with graphs and multiple colors in another tutorial.  Next month, we will shift focus and see a few new double knit stitches that everyone of all skill levels can enjoy.

Double Knit Tutorial Series: Part I      Part II       Part III

 

2 Comments

  • Thank you for the great tutorial on double knit color change. My daughter and I were trying (with limited success) to change colors. I saw your Advent creations and they looked beautiful but I was afraid to try them. Now I have worked up to the second color change of the checkerboard and it looks great. I’ll be trying some of the Advent projects this fall! Thank you for teaching us. I had just two questions: in double knitting when one changes color is there a need to “twist” the yarns ? Secondly, what is back to back weaving? Thank you for the great instructions.

  • Hi Cindy, So happy that you and your daughter are enjoying colors in your knitting. The back to back or b/b weave is shown and explained in Part 1 and the link is at bottom of this tutorial. But this is also shown in this tutorial where the weaving is front to back rather than the stockinette. Thank you for asking about twisting the yarns, as it is important in color change. If you are working in stockinette where one color is across the weave of the other, you do not need to twist the yarns at the junction of 2 colors meeting. This is because the stockinette will lock the knit together. If, however, you are working in color blocks with 2 different yarns that are not woven over each other, you will want to twist them where they meet. Otherwise, the sections will not be connected in finished knit and will need some ‘sewing’ to connect them. You may find that if you are adding a small amount of a color in your design, it makes twisting easier to cut a small amount of yarn for that section rather than working with 2 large skeins of yarn.

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May 16, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Is Laddering?

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The first thing most people learn when learning to loom knit is how to work the e-wrap knit stitch.  Some people only use this stitch to create endless items.  It’s a very simple stitch that many prefer over the knit stitch or even learning the purl stitch.  Nothing wrong with that.  It is a knit stitch after all.  And an easy one.  Think I said that already.

But it has its drawbacks.  Beginners always have that same question when making hats or other items worked in the round.  Why do I have a large gap between the first and last stitch?  It only happens with e-wrap worked in the round.  Never with flat panels.  Why is that?  It really is a simple answer.  Let’s talk about the laddering effect.

What is laddering?

Laddering is that gap between the first and last stitch of a project worked in the round when using the e-wrap knit stitch when the entire loom is wrapped before knitting over.  It leaves the yarn between the stitches in horizontal lines that looks like a ladder.  Hence the name.

Here is an example of laddering:

Ladder effect with e-wrap knit stitch

Ladder effect with e-wrap knit stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why does it happen?

Laddering happens when all the pegs on the entire loom are wrapped then knit over.  This is due to each stitch getting looser has the bottom loop is lifted over the top loop.  It is actually on the round below, not the round just wrapped.  With the twist in the stitch, each stitch gets pulled a little when knit over making the next one a little looser when it is knit over.  And so on until you end the round with that extra between the first and last stitch.  By the time the last stitch is worked, there is enough of a gap to be noticed.

This is why it doesn’t happen with flat panels.  The extra bit that creates the ladder when working in the round ends up at the edge.

Sometimes this will not happen with bulkier yarns especially if the yarn is slightly bulkier than the loom gauge requires.

Is it due to tension?

Tension is not really the issue when it comes to laddering.  Some people like to use yarn guides or empty pens to make it faster to wrap the pegs.  This will not prevent laddering.  Laddering happens when knitting over, not how tight you wrap the pegs.

But why is mine laddering between all the stitches??

If using a smaller yarn weight than the loom gauge like using 1 strand of worsted with a large gauge loom, laddering will happen between each stitch with e-wrap whether in the round or a flat panel.  The twist in the stitch will keep the stitches from pulling together when off the loom.

Example of 1 strand worsted on large gauge loom

Example of 1 strand worsted on large gauge loom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This effect is sometimes desired for lacier projects.  But if it’s not desired, make sure the yarn weight matches the gauge of the loom.  Learn more on yarn weights and which gauge loom to use here.

How do I prevent laddering in my work?

The best way to prevent laddering is one not often preferred.  That is to wrap and knit over each peg as you go.  That way each stitch is exactly the same.  But most people prefer to wrap the loom first.  And that leads us to the next question.

Are there other ways to prevent it without working each peg as you go?

Some people say to start and stop at different pegs on each round.  That will work as long as those pegs that you are stopping at are not next to each other.  If you stop at the one before the last peg you stopped at on the previous round, the laddering will be on a diagonal instead of vertical.

If you wrap the pegs in shorter sections then knit over before going on to the next section, the amount of yarn that is made loose is not as much and therefore not as noticed.  If you wrap only 5 to 10 pegs at a time, the laddering effect will not happen.

Will it “fix” itself if left alone?

Yes.  Most times, if the item is given time to relax, the stitches will “fix” themselves, and the ladder will disappear.   Blocking will help too depending on the fiber used.

 

While I am not one to use e-wrap knit stitch very often, it is a wonderful stitch that can add texture or is just easy to work.  If you are ready to make that next step to a different knit stitch, please check out my article Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch?

Until next time!  Happy loom knitting!

3 Comments

  • This is very good article. I will definitely add this to my “need to know” folder.

  • Thanks Jonnita.

  • Wrap and knit over each peg as you go is the only way I do Ewrap knit, both as flat panel and in the round. It makes a tremendous difference. I also use it as a cast on and the result is less loopy than the traditional Ewrap cast on. This method works great on hats too. Thanks for the great article.

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Apr 25, 2016

Double Knit 101-Part III

Double Knit 101—Part II        Double Knit 101-Part I

Elizabeth with hat:scarfShaping the Knit

Yay, you completed your double knit scarf last month! That’s really so cool, because you did the basic cast on with anchor yarn, changed stitch patterns with the Stockinette stitch and the Rib stitch. Hopefully, you finished off both ends and have it ready to wear, when needed. Well, some folks still need their warm wearables handy with the snow still flying in parts of the country.

Your current abbreviations learned are:

Stockinette stitch=St stitch, or K stitch= knit stitch. (same stitch),

Back/to/back stitch=b/b

Rib stitch=Rib stitch

Increase=inc

Decrease=dec, or DD=double dec

Cast On=CO

Bind Off=BO

Approximately=aprox

Regular row=a row with no increase or decrease

So today, I want to share with you the basics of increasing and decreasing, so you can make lots more fun items in double knit. What can we make, and when will you use the inc and dec? Let’s look at some different situations, and what will the pattern say? The best way to explain the shaping is to just make something with these techniques, for example, a hat to match your scarf.  With a double knit hat, we usually make it on a long loom so that we can get the entire length going around the head, all in one piece.  This way the cast on, with the  anchor yarn edge, will be at the top of hat, and then,  just gather the top with the anchor yarn.  But sometimes that method creates a hat that is very bunched up at the top, or sits on your head like a paper sack pulled down.

I am using the 18-All-n-One-Loom as the 10″ Knitting Board would be limited, for this example.  The All-n-One Loom has 48 pegs, and my hat will need 56 stitches.  So, we can just make this in 2 pieces, each will have 28 sts.  OH no, you say, sewing? Maybe I did it on purpose, because I wanted to show you how the invisible stitch can be just that…invisible.  So with our hat, we are going to make it in 2 shaped pieces and sew them together with invisible stitch.  Each piece will look something like this.

hat front 2

Here is the hat front or back, they will be the same.  We will start the piece at brim and work with rib stitch and stockinette.  We will do dec across the center and, on up to hat top. We will use the dec at beginning and end of each row as well as randomly across the entire row.

#5 yarn and the All-n-One Loom, set at smallest spacing is used in sample.  This will produce a size small hat to fit head circumference of approximately 21-22″.  You can make a larger hat by using the mid spacing of the All-n-One Loom.  If you are using the 28″Loom, maintain the smaller setting.  For a deeper hat, work 12 rows of rib st and 12 rows of stockinette st.  Our sample measures aprox 9″ deep.

Cast On 28 stitches in stockinette stitch.  Work in Rib stitch for 10 rows.

Change to Stockinette stitch and work for 10 rows.  For a deeper hat, change to 12 rows of each stitch.  This will add 1″ in depth.  We will go thru the series of a dec row before completing our hat panel.

pick up 3rd stitch

Decrease at ends of loom and across the loom: A basic dec is same as term (k2tog)  or knit 2 sts together as one.  This is what we are doing.  When you combine 2 sts, you are creating an empty peg and the peg next to it has 2 loops.  If you leave the pegs empty and continue weaving over them, you will create an open hole as with an eyelet design.  On the other hand, if you move the sts together and eliminate the empty peg, you are reducing the amount of stitches, and making the knit width narrower.  This is what we want to do to shape the hat around the head.

 

place on peg 4

 

 

Sometimes, you want to just bring in the ends with a dec at each end, or some shapes, like a neckline will ask you to dec at just the front end, or back end of loom.  When you want a more sharp curve like our hat, we will use some dec rows that will have multiple decreases all across the knitting.  It all does the same thing-make the knit smaller in width.Remember, the dec stitches must be done to both boards for a basic process.

We have created empty pegs on both boards by moving loop on peg 2 to peg 3.  It is always best to do a dec or inc from inside the knit rather than at the first stitch.  There will be times when you will work from peg one, but that is usually for ruffles and intricate little items.

ready to close in open pegs

 

 

 

 

create open pegs for dec

Once you have all the open pegs you need to reduce the size of the knit, start at center of loom and move the pegs over towards center.  If you are working with an empty peg that has the 2 loops, be sure to move both of them to next peg.  Sometime there will be more than one peg to jump over, and it will be a tight stretch.  Just go slow and careful, so that the loops are on the intended pegs.

In the photo above, you can see 6 empty pegs on each board.  They are ready to be moved over.  They all need to be adjacent to each other in order to weave the next (shorter) row.  After this row is complete, you will have just 22 sts instead of the 28 sts that you cast on.  Be sure to weave over all pegs to complete the row.

pick up both loops and move over

It can be a bit of a stretch as you move the loops over to close in the empty pegs.  Once they are all moved, weave over the pegs and hook over, being careful to lift both loops when working  the double loops.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eyelets

 

Remember, if you leave the loops spaced out, and weave over them, without moving them together, you will create eyelets.

 

 

 

 

Continue the shaping of the hat: We are working from L side of loom.

Decrease row #1-Lift loop #3 and place it on peg #4, both boards.  Place loop #8 onto peg #9, both boards.  Place loop #13 onto peg #14, both boards.  Notice they are all laying towards center.  Now, place loop #16 onto peg #15, both boards, and loop #21 onto peg #20, and then loop #26 onto peg #25, both boards.  Your dec is done.  Now, carefully move the loops over until they are all adjacent to each other and you now have 22 sts.  Check carefully to be sure you do not have empty pegs.  Sometimes, when moving the double loops on one peg, it helps to move one at a time, so you don’t accidentally lose one of them.  Weave over the 22 sts and hook over.

22 sts after dec.2

Work 2 regular rows in stockinette.

Dec #2-Lift loop #3 onto peg #4 on both boards.  Do this to both ends of loom.  You are dec by 2 sts.

Work 4 regular rows in stockinette.

Dec #3- Lift loop #4 onto peg #5 and loop # 9 onto peg #10.  Do this to both boards.  Lift loop #17 onto peg #16, and loop #12 onto #11.  Do this to both boards.  We are decreasing by 4 stitches.  Now there are 16 sts on loom.

Work 2 regular rows in stockinette.

Repeat dec row #2.  Work 1 regular row.

Repeat dec row #2 again.  Work 1 reg row.

Dec #4-decrease by 3 sts.  Lift loop #3 onto peg #4, both boards, both ends, and one dec in center of knitting.  There are 9 sts remaining.   Work 1 reg row.

Repeat dec row #4-so that you now have 6 sts remaining.  Work 1 reg row.

Dec 1 st at each end of loom on both boards.  Work 1 reg row.

Dec 1 st at each end of loom on both boards, and bind off the last sts.  THIS PIECE IS DONE.

Now, make a 2nd piece exactly the same-it will go so much faster than the first.

 

ready to put togetherYou now need to sew them together using the invisible stitch.  If you look at the outer edges of the hat pieces, you will see where you want to do the sewing-right on the outer edge, so that you can just pull the pieces together.  I like to pin the pieces in place before beginning.  You can do this with some nice smooth double pointed knitting needles, or, find some very smooth toothpicks.

 

 

pinned together for sewing

 

Do the sewing with matching yarn, aprox 3′ long.  Use a darning needle to make the stitches.  The yarn used in the sample is a contrast color yarn.  This was done on purpose, so you can see the stitches, and then see how it disappears once pulled snug into the knitting.

The bind off of each piece can be done before the sewing, and remove the anchor yarn, or you can leave them in until after the sewing.  I will use this method, so we can have one continuous bind off all around the hat.

Start sewing at one corner of hat at anchor yarn by simply tying the yarn about 1″ from bottom edge.  Bring yarn up thru the knit to the starting point for sewing.

 

edges to be sewn

This is ready to sew together.  With darning needle, start on one edge and grab the cross stitch inside the edge.  Without pulling it tight, grab the cross stitch inside other edge.  Keep following the seam by alternating from one edge to the other.  After working for about 2″, you can gently pull the working yarn to bring the 2 edges together.  See the pale yellow yarn sewn loosely, and then see how it totally disappears in the next photo.You can gently shape the top of the hat to be rounded or flat across the top, just with the sewing.

 

stitching

invisible sewing.2

 

Once you have sewn the hats pieces together, you are ready to do a nice finish on the hat brim. This will be a simple crochet bind off as shown in Part I of Double Knit 101. The bind off will connect the 2 pieces with a seamless finished edge.  Remove the 2 anchor yarns.  Weave in any yarn tails, trim excess and your hat is ready to wear.  Add adornments if desired, like a little round flower.

Basic Increase preview-Making a circle.

circle

Cast On 3 sts stockinette. Place anchor yarn.

Work 1 reg row.

Inc from st #1 to peg #2, both ends and both boards. Work row.

Work 1 reg row.

Continue with inc row, now moving stitch #2 to peg #3, and 1 regular row until you have 13 stitches.

Work 2 reg rows.

Inc row, continue till you have 15 sts.

Work 3 regular rows.

Complete in reverse using the dec instead of inc.

Keep working until you are back to 3 sts.

Bind off at both anchor, and loom.

So how is the basic Inc done in double knit?  Pretty much like the Dec except move the 1st stitch out to new empty peg.  You have an empty peg between st 1 and st 2.  Instead, pick up the loop behind the adjacent peg (this is the last row dropped off) of peg #3.  Place that loop onto the empty peg.  You now have a new stitch on that empty peg.  If you do this to both sides and both ends, your next row will have 2 more stitches. With 5 stitches, now do the inc rows from stitch #2 to peg #3.

Cast on 3 sts.     Move stitch #1 to new peg creating empty peg.  Same on both boards and at both ends.

caston 3 sts

move 2 peg out2

 

 

 

Now you see row with 7 stitches.  We are lifting the loop from the previous row to place on the empty peg for the new stitch.  Next photo shows the new stitches.  Weave this row and hook over.

We can go into more detail for the inc process next month, when we will be talking about some color additions, and intarsia designs.  We will want to cover buttonholes, for sure.  After that some new exciting stitches.  Join us here!inc to empty peg

stitch to pick up

6 Comments

  • Pat,
    Another great article. Really like the explanation of he invisible stitch. That is the only stitch I use when sewing together items. Am looking forward to next article when you talk about Intarsia design, a favorite topic and one people like to learn. Thanks for sharing your wealth of knowledge with everyone.

  • Thank you, Sue. I agree with the sewing stitch-it seems to work in so many situations. Pat

  • I love these tutorials. That circle would be great to make the bottom of a knitted bag.

  • Hi Claudia, that’s a great idea. How about the bottom of a basket or cup holder, even a knitting board bag. Thanks, Pat

  • Awesome tutorial! While I didn’t make the hat (yet), I did use it to make the top of a hanging towel and it worked great. Thank you so much! I looked at other tutorials and they just didn’t explain it the way you did, you made it so easy. I agree with you and Claudia, a basket would be fun to make.

  • Hi Jen, That’s a super use of creating a circular piece-I hadn’t thought of that. Great creative idea. Pat

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