Browsing articles in "Techniques (How-to)"
Nov 6, 2017

Ripples & Ribs Stitch, Stitchology 38

Front Side Ripples & Ribs

 

This is a stitch that is full of loft, texture, and lines, both straight and wavy.  The best  part of this new stitch is that it is completely reversible, with its vertical lines trailing between sections of texture along the front side, and lovely undulating ripples showing horizontally across the back side.  Feel free to use this stitch on anything for which both sides will be featured, such as scarves, blankets, and even reversible hats!

Back Side Ripples & Ribs

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations

K,k: knit

P,p: purl

WY: working yarn

S1, s1: slip one stitch (simply skip this peg while carrying the working yarn behind the peg)

rep: repeat.

 

Chart Key for Repeating Pattern Rows

 Ripples & Ribs Repeating Pattern 

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 6—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

Repeating Pattern for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 6.  Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1: *s1, k1, p1, s1, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 2: *p2, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 3: *s1, p2, rep from * to end.

Row 4: *p1, k3, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 5: *s1, k2, rep from * to end.

Row 6:  *k1, p1, k1, p1, k2, rep from * to end.

Row 7: Repeat Row 3.

Row 8: Repeat Row 2.

Row 9: *s1, p1, k1, s1, k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 10: k all sts.

Rep rows 1-10 for desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 6):

Round 1: *s1, k1, p1, s1, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Round 2: *k1, p2, rep from * to end.

Round 3: *s1, p2, rep from * to end.

Round 4: *k1, p1, k3, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 5: *s1, k2, rep from * to end.

Round 6:  *k2, p1, k1, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Round 7: Repeat Row 3.

Round 8: Repeat Row 2.

Round 9: *s1, p1, k1, s1, k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 10: k all sts.

Rep rounds 1-10 for desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

  • Hi Bethany, I just watched the video on the new Ripples & Ribs stitch and I absolutely love it. Can you tell me what cast on and bind off you used please and thank you.

    Corry

  • I’m so glad you like the stitch, Corry! :) I pretty much always use the Chain Cast On and the Basic Bind Off for all my projects. They look very similar to each other, so provide nicely matched edges.

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Oct 20, 2017

Alternate Rib Hat

Loom: ‘Rotating’ Double Knit Loom, set up for double knitting.

Yarn:  Knit Picks Preciosa Tonal, 100% Merino Wool, worsted weight, 1skein.  Color ‘Canary’ in sample.

Stitches: Rib, Alternate Rib

Notions:  Knit hook, Crochet hook, one stitch marker (optional)

 Size:  Average Adult

Pattern notes:  Hat brim is knit in the rib stitch. The rest of the hat is knit in the rib and alternating rib stitch. Work by alternating these 2 stitches, round 1 and round 2 until hat length complete.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Place the stitch marker on beginning peg, if desired, or use arrow. Cast On in stockinette stitch.  Lay anchor yarn around stitches between the looms.

Rounds 1-8:  Work rib stitch until end of round.

Round 9: Work alternate rib, until end of round.

Round 10:  Work rib stitch until end of round.

Repeat rounds 9 and 10 until you have a total length of approximately

8-8.5” from brim edge.  Complete the knitting with a row of rib stitch.

See photos below for weaving patterns for the Rib and Alternate Rib Stitch. The blue yarn show the ribbing, and yellow yarn shows the alternate rib.

 

             RIB STITCH

Beginning of round one

End of round one

End of round two

              ALTERNATE RIB

Beginning of the round one

End of round one

Once the knit is desired length, you are ready to bind off.  Move loops from inner loom to outer loom so that each peg on outer loom has 2 loops, and the inner loom is empty, hook over, bottom loop over top.  Now, one loop remains on each peg on outer loom.

Cut the working yarn coming from the project, leaving about 16-20 inches of yarn to use for the gathering process.

Thread the yarn tail through the eye of a tapestry needle. Pass the needle up and under the first stitch on the loom. Remove the stitch from the peg and leave it on the yarn tail. Go to the next peg and remove the stitch from the peg with the needle. This stitch will also rest on the yarn tail. Continue working around the loom until all the stitches have been removed and are secured on the yarn tail.

Gently pull on the yarn tail, cinching the top of the item closed. Pass the needle through the center of the gathered stitches and turn the hat inside out. Do a few securing stitches. Knot your yarn and weave in the tail.

Bind off the cast on stitches at anchor yarn with crochet hook for a completed hat.

 

 

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Oct 16, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Read A Chart?

 

 

 

 

 

Everybody loves a video.  Lots of people only use videos when making items because they prefer to not read patterns.  But  learning to read patterns is great because it opens up lots more projects to make since not every pattern has a complete video tutorial.

But wait…  There’s more.

Patterns actually come in 3 formats.

The first format is videos.  But like I mentioned, not all patterns are available in video format.

The second format is written patterns.  Patterns in written form are like reading code.  Words are abbreviated and sections are written as repeats so that the pattern itself is not the length of a novel written by Diana Gabaldon or George R. R. Martin…  But putting men from the Scottish Highlands and fear of long winters aside for the moment, it can get rather lengthy when a pattern is written out in full, and it really is like learning to read another language which means you do have to put forth the effort to learn to read the code.  If you are looking for more on reading a pattern, check out Loom FAQs:  How Do I Read A Pattern?

And the last format is charts.  While most patterns are not fully “written” in charts in knitting, the stitch pattern itself is.  Once a person can read both patterns and charts, there is nothing they cannot make.

Why EXACTLY are charts so great?

Charts are wonderful ways of conveying the stitch patterns without words.  It is truly universal.  Like mathematics, knitting charts can be read by anyone no matter what language they speak or read.  But there are other ways that charts are great as well.

For people who loom knit, we need to convert written needle patterns in order to make them on looms unless they are written in the round.  But when reading charts, needle knitters have to convert or change the wrong side rows while loom knitter do not.  Charts can be worked exactly as they appear row for row.  This is why I love stitch pattern books for knitting that contain charts.  And this is why all loom knitters should learn to read charts.  Then we don’t need special loom knitting stitch pattern books.  We can use the same book that the needle knitters use.

So how are charts read?

Before we get into how to read a chart, let’s discuss what the chart is.  A chart is just a grid of boxes where each box represents a stitch on a row or round.  It looks like graph paper.

While most charts for stitch patterns are made of boxes that are square like on regular graph paper, knitting stitches are not square.  Each knit stitch is shorter than it is wide.  Or wider than it is tall.  This is why there are more rows in an inch vertically than there stitches in an inch horizontally.  This is the reason that knitting graph paper for charting pictures or words is not made of squares.  These graphs have cells that are rectangular.  If you chart a picture with graph paper made of squares, the finished knitted picture will be short and fat when compared to the picture desired.  But when using charts to depict stitch patterns and not pictures, square cells are most commonly used.

Now we can discuss how to read a chart…

The following chart is the herringbone stitch pattern from the Stitchology column written by Bethany Daily here on the KB blog.  This stitch was the first in the Stitchology series.  If you haven’t been keeping up with Bethany’s column, then you are missing out on some fabulous stitch patterns.  And guess what?  She even covers reading stitch charts as well in the herringbone stitch post as well.  Maybe between us both, we will get the word out on how to read charts…  Here is the chart:

 

 

 

 

But the chart alone means nothing without the key.  In books, the key will not be found with every stitch chart.  It will most often be found in one of two places in the book.  Either in the front or the back.  Therefore, if you see a chart but not the key, you will be able to find it elsewhere.  If you cannot find it, then it is like looking for a treasure without a map.

PLEASE NOTE:

I do need to clarify something here.  While all knitting charts are shown from the right side, some needle stitch pattern books will have 2 keys for the symbols.  They will have a right side key and a wrong side key.  In these books, the wrong side key will be the same symbol as the right side but the opposite stitch for flat panels.  So it will have the symbol for knit on the right side and the same symbol for purl for the wrong side.

Also, when using needle stitch charts that do not have 2 keys, it will indicate the stitch for the right side and the stitch for the wrong side.

Loom knitters will ALWAYS use the right side stitch.  That is the part to remember.  RIGHT SIDE STITCH ONLY!

 

Here is the Chart Key:

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see in the above chart, the rows are numbered from the bottom to the top.

The cast on is not listed on the chart because the cast on is not considered a row.  It is simply the foundation of loops that all the rows sit on top of.

Also you need to remember that this is for the stitch pattern itself.  Not the complete pattern in most cases.  Therefore if there is a border at the bottom or the sides, those will need to be done before working these rows.

But if you are working a pattern that has a chart, you will need to cast on in certain direction ALWAYS when reading charts or patterns.  The reason is you will be working each stitch as it appears on the chart.  Stitch 1 on row 1 will always appear on the bottom right hand corner of the chart so that row 1 is worked from right to left.

This is the reason you will need to cast on from left to right when casting on for a flat panel so that you will be ready to start row 1 from right to left.

When casting on in the round, you will cast on from right to left so that you will be ready to work from right to left when starting round 1.

Now let’s look at the rows themselves on the chart.  On the right you see the odd rows numbered and on the left the even rows are numbers.  This is make the chart easier to read.  Especially for flat panels.  After working row 1 from right to left, you then work row 2 from left to right.  And there is the number 2 for the second row on the left hand side making it easier to find once you have worked you way across row 1.

But what exactly does each square mean?

The key tells us what stitch to use.  Each square represents a stitch.  This stitch pattern only uses knit and purl stitches.  Therefore there are only 2 types of squares.  In other words, this is a simple stitch pattern if you can keep up with which stitch goes where.

The empty squares do not mean that there isn’t a stitch.  It means those are the knit stitches.

The squares with the single dot in the middle are the purl stitches.

When the stitch pattern is more complicated, the symbols and where they are placed become more complex as well.  This is why it is better to start off with a simple stitch pattern when starting to read charts.

For most charts that are included with patterns, the charts only show just a certain number of stitches.  The number of stitches will vary chart to chart since these are the number of stitches that will be repeated.  For the herringbone stitch, the stitch is a repeat of 10 stitches.  If you are making something larger than 10 stitches, you will need to make the item with a multiple of 10 then add the number of stitches for the side borders on a flat panel.  If working in the round, it will just be the multiple of 10.

Now to start reading our chart.  When you start with the first row of the stitch pattern, you should be on the right side of the loom working to the left.  For the herringbone example, you will knit 3 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 1 stitch, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 2 stitches.  Then you will repeat those for however many repeats you are working.  For 30 stitches total, you will repeat it another 2 times for 3 times total.  For 100 stitches total, you will repeat for 9 times making it a total of 10 times.

Now for a flat panel, you are on the left side of the work getting ready to work from left to right on row 2.  You will follow the stitches on the chart from left to right this time.  Row 2 will be knit 1 stitch, then purl 2 stitches, then 3 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 2 stitches before repeating.

If you are working in the round, you will just continue working from right to left and follow the chart from right to left as well.  Round 2 would then be knit 2 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 3 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 1 stitch before repeating.

Then on to row or round 3…  Hopefully you have the idea now of what will need to be done for row 3.  And also see how long it takes to write out a row stitch for stitch…

What would this chart look like written out?

Well if the herringbone pattern was written out in a pattern without a chart, it would be written as follows for the stitch pattern with the chart on the right side for comparison:

Abbreviations for our little demonstration:

K: knit

P: purl

Rep: repeat

For a flat panel:

Row 1: *K3, P2, K1, P2, K2, rep from *

Row 2: *K1, P2, K3, P2, K2, rep from *

Row 3: *K1, P2, K5, P2, rep from *

Row 4: *P1, K2, P1, K1, P1, K2, P1, K1, rep from *

For in the round:

Round 1:  *K3, P2, K1, P2, K2, rep from *

Round 2:  *K2, P2, K3, P2, K1, rep from *

Round 3:  *K1, P2, K5, P2, rep from *

Round 4:  K1, P1, K2, P1, K1, P1, K2, P1, rep from *

 

I hope this helps clear up any confusion charts may present.  But something I have learned over the years is the best way to learn something is to just do it.  If you make mistakes, don’t worry!  With yarn, just pull it out and try again.  It is ok to make mistakes.  It is how we learn.

Now it’s time to put the fear of charts aside, grab a ball of yarn, and tackle that pattern you have been wanting to make!  Happy loom knitting!

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Oct 2, 2017

Bobbles and Seed Stitch: Stitchology 37

This month is all about creating the classic look of bobbles! There are so many stitches that incorporate bobbles into their design that a column of stitch tutorials would be remiss not to include them. After playing with many different types of bobbles, I came up with a version that is nice and plump and provides that wonderful “pop” that they are famous for. The steps involved in creating these happy little bumps are broken down in written and video format, and the bobbles are then inserted into two repeating patterns for your enjoyment.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap, unless otherwise stated.

Abbreviations

K,k: knit

P,p: purl

KO: knit off (lift bottom loop(s) over top loop and completely over the top of the peg)

WY: working yarn

HH: half hitch (create a loop with WY by twisting in opposite way than when making an EW and place on peg. The WY will be coming from underneath the twist rather than on top.)

rep: repeat.

 

Chart Key for Repeating Pattern Rows

Steps to Create a Bobble (Bobbles can be worked going in either direction on the loom…Simply number the bobble pegs 1-3 in the order they are worked in the first bobble step.):

Step 1: k3

Step 2: move the loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Move the loop from peg 3 also to peg 2. KO 2 loops over 1 on peg 2.

Step 3: HH onto peg 3, k peg 2, HH onto peg 1.

Step 4: (k3) repeat 3 times, will end on peg 3.

Step 5: move the loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Move the loop from peg 3 also to peg 2. KO 2 loops over 1 on peg 2.

Step 6: reach down at the back side of the work and pull up the 3 loops from the base of the bobble that were knit in Step 1 and place them back onto pegs 1-3.

Step 7: WY will be coming from peg 2. K peg 3.  Continue with remainder of row.

Step 8: Knit next row of pattern, KO 2 loops over 1 on peg 2 of bobble.

Here’s a video of just the steps to make a bobble:

 

Working Bobbles into a Basic Stitch

This basic stitch uses a multiple of 9 pegs x 9 rows. The bobble itself requires 3 pegs and is worked on Row 5 only. The extra pegs and rows around these 3 bobble pegs act as a buffer between the bobbles when repeated. The number of “buffer” pegs and rows can be adjusted as desired to meet the needs of the project.

(Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 9. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Rows 1-4: k9

Row 5: k3, create bobble, k3.

Row 6: k4, k 2 loops as one on peg 5, k4.

Rows 7-9:  k9

 

Bobble & Seeds Repeating Pattern 

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 22—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

Working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 22. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Rows 1-4: *k11, p1, k9, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 5: *k4, create bobble, k4, p1, k3, create bobble, k3, p1, rep from * to end.

Rows 6-9: Repeat Rows 1-4.

Rows 10 & 11: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Rows 12-15: Repeat Rows 1-4.

Row 16: Repeat Row 5.

Rows 17-20: Repeat Rows 1-4.

Rows 21 & 22: Repeat Rows 10 & 11.

Rep rows 1-22 for desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 22):

Rounds 1-4:  Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Round A:*k11, p1, k9, p1, rep from * to end.

Round B: *p1, k9, p1, k11, rep from * to end.

Round 5: *k4, create bobble, k4, p1, k3, create bobble, k3, p1, rep from * to end.

Rounds 6-9:  Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Round C: *p1, k9, p1, k11, rep from * to end.

Round D: *k11, p1, k9, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 10: *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Round 11: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Rounds 12-15:  Repeat Rounds 6-9.

Round 16: *p1, k3, create bobble, k3, p1, k4, create bobble, k4, rep from * to end.

Rounds 17-20:  Repeat Rounds 1-4.

Round 21: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 22: *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Rep rows 1-22 for desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

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Sep 21, 2017

Loom FAQs: What Is A Provisional Cast On?

 

 

 

 

 

There are always so many questions in the loom knitting world on social media.  Why is my bind off so tight?  How I can match my bind off to my cast on?  What is waste yarn?  How do I cast on and still have live stitches for grafting?  

One of the more common problems in the world of loom knitting the getting the cast on and bind off to match.  Most people cannot get the tension on both ends to match due to the differences in the cast on and bind off methods.  But never fear.  There is a solution to that.

And while that one question at the first seems a bit off topic, all of the questions above do have the same answer.

That answer is using waste yarn to cast on.

What is waste yarn?

Waste yarn is just yarn of another color that is used to cast on and then used to knit the first few rows.

Why would I use waste yarn to cast on?

When waste yarn is used to cast on, the yarn that will then be used in the project can be added so that the waste yarn can be removed later.

Why would I want to remove the waste yarn?

While there are a lot of reasons to use waste yarn to cast on, there is only one main reason to remove the waste yarn after casting on.

That reason is to leave live stitches on the cast on end of the project.

What are “live stitches”?

Live stitches are the loops that are to be worked in knitting.  Generally speaking those are the stitches that are always on the pegs of the loom waiting to worked.  When binding off, those live stitches are being “closed” or ended so they will not run or unravel when the work is removed from the loom.

Why would I want live stitches on the cast on end?

There are a couple of very good reasons for wanting to have live stitches on the cast on end of a piece of work.

And both reason have to do with finishing the piece.

The first reason is so the work can then be placed back on the loom so that you can use the same bind off you used on the other end.  This is the best way to get both ends to match since they are worked in the exact same manner.

The second reason is so the cast on and bind off edges can be grafted together using the kitchener stitch to get a seamless join when making infinity scarves or other garments where you want to join but do not want a visible seam.

How do I work the provisional cast on so I get live stitches on the cast on edge to do with as my heart desires?

I am so very glad you asked!  Let’s get started!

Provisional Cast On

There are 2 things you will need when working a provisional cast on.  Well 1 thing definitely.  The other is just very highly recommended by yours truly in order to make your life easier and meaningful…

You will need waste yarn and a life line.  While both of those are just yarn, I would like to make certain recommendations first.

Waste Yarn 

When using waste yarn, you will want to use yarn that you will not be using again.  It does not need to be the same type of yarn you are using in the project.  If you are using high end yarn, please do not use the same for the waste yarn.  Why?  Well it IS called WASTE yarn for a reason.  You may be cutting it and most likely will not be able to reuse it so it becomes trash or waste.

I suggest using an inexpensive yarn that is a contrasting color.  You will want to be able to tell the difference between the waste yarn and the project yarn.

Lifeline

Life lines are just yarn in a different color as well.  But unlike waste yarn, you can reuse yarn that is used for lifelines.  Another suggestion is that the lifeline be a different color than the waste yarn AND the project.  This is so there is no confusion between the 3 different things.  I am one that tries my hardest to keep from being confused.  And my yarn is the one thing I have complete control over in my life.

If you are new to using lifelines in your work,  you can find more information in Loom FAQs  What Is a Lifeline?  The method that we will be doing here is adding the lifeline after the work is off the loom but the stitches that will be picked up are not the ones shown in the article.  More on that later.

Now let’s get started.

I have a loom, my project yarn which is the purple, my waste yarn which is the beige, and my lifeline which is orange.

First we will cast on with the waste yarn.  Doesn’t matter what cast on you use.  I suggest using the simplest and quickest which is the wrap cast on.

Now we will work about 6 rows of knit.  Doesn’t matter which knit stitch you use on this part.  It doesn’t need to match the rest of the work since we will be taking it off

Now we cut our waste yarn leaving a short tail.  It is finished for this project.

Add your project yarn in whatever manner you like when joining your yarn.

Here I have placed the slip knot on a neighboring peg so I can start knitting on peg 1.

The russian join is not a good one here since you still need that end.  You will want to leave a tail long enough to work whatever bind off or seaming technique you are planning on using when finishing the cast on edge later.

If you will be seaming with the kitchener stitch, leave a yarn tail about 1 and a half lengths of the pegs that are cast on.

If you plan on working the basic bind off, then you will want to leave a yarn tail at least 3 lengths of the pegs that are cast on.

You can simply put a slip knot on the first peg and then start working your pattern from here at row 1.

Or if you are like me and do not like knots in your work, just simply start row.  You do not need a knot or an anchor peg.  Just start knitting.  More on how to do that can be found in Loom FAQs:  Why Not Knots?

Continue until you are finished with your bind off on the other end.

Here you can see the work after it is off the loom

If you are wanting to graft the 2 ends together, simply place a second lifeline through the stitches on the loom and remove it.  Unless you will be adding the cast on edge to the bind off edge and binding them off together.  Then just leave it on the loom…

 

Now we will place the lifeline.  The lifeline will be placed in a different manner since we will be unraveling from the cast on end.  The loops are that need the lifeline are not the loops that are on the pegs which is why we didn’t place the lifeline as we went.  If the lifeline is placed through the stitches on the pegs, the lifeline will not go through the live stitches once the waste yarn is removed.  Sounds crazy, I know.  But just trust me on this.  When unraveling from the cast on end, the live stitches are between the pegs, not on them.

 

Turn the work over to see the back.

The first row where the project yarn can be seen are the stitches that will be picked up by the lifeline.

They are the ones at the bottom still in the beige stitches.

 

 

 

Thread the lifeline onto the tapestry needle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and run the needle through each of the loops until all are on the lifeline.

 

 

 

 

 

Since the lifeline has been placed, there is no need to fear dropped stitches.

Simply cut the work here on the waste yarn and then unravel the rest of the waste yarn until all that is left is the project with all the live stitches securely on the lifeline.

 

Or you can just pull the end tail of the waste yarn out across the piece so the waste yarn may be used again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now you are free to do whatever you please with those live stitches.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are wanting to bind off that end like the other end, simply put those stitches back on the loom and then bind off in the method of choice.

If you are wanting to bind off the cast on and bind off ends together, just place the stitches back on the loom over the stitches that are already on there by bring the work up through the middle of the loom making sure you do not catch the loom in the middle of the scarf.  Yes.  It has been done.  Yes.  I have seen it.

If you are wanting to graft the 2 ends together, proceed with whatever manner you choose whether it be the kitchener stitch on needles or putting the cast on end over the bind off end on the loom so that the kitchener stitch can be worked on the loom.  Both methods of working the Kitchener stitch can be found in Loom FAQs:  What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?

 

Well there you have it!  Waste yarn, the provisional cast on, and reasons why you would want live stitches on the cast on end.

Hope all your loom knitting projects have a happy ending!

2 Comments

  • This is sooooo helpful. Thank you for posting this and adding the detailed photos.

  • A very well written and photographed tutorial. I will definitely try this. Thanks for taking the time to wrie it!

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Sep 4, 2017

Stitchology 36: Triple Wrap Around Stitch

This month’s stitch creates a lacy, yet still plush design that is reminiscent of cresting waves upon ocean beaches, seashells, or even fish scales (holey mackerel, lol!). It uses a new technique of wrapping back and forth between two pegs at a time to achieve this lovely effect.  Feel free to use this stitch for pretty much any type of project, as it is beautiful when viewed from either side.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The “triple wrap around” (TWA) referred to in this pattern is a combination of techniques worked on just two pegs, moving back and forth between them in the following manner (instructions are to begin from right to left/clockwise):

Step 1: S2 (carry working yarn (WY) behind pegs 1 & 2)

Step 2: Bring WY around to the front of peg 2 and SWYF (slip stitch with working yarn in front of peg: see below for more info) on peg 2 and on peg 1.

Step 3: Bring WY behind peg 1 and 2 and around to the front of the peg 2.  SWYF again on peg 2.

Step 4: Bring WY between peg 2 and peg 1 and around to the front of peg 1, creating an E-wrap.

Step 5: KO peg 1.  K peg 2.

 

(SWYF) directly translates to: Slip With Working Yarn in Front. This simply means that this peg will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg.

*Note: another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

 

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

*Note: The stitches in the chart that are bordered with darker lines are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.

When working a Flat Panel, the stitches outside the border square are worked only once: at the end of the odd rows, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed and at the beginning of the even rows, before the Repeating Pattern Rows are worked and repeated.

When working in the Round, only repeat the 4 stitches of the Repeating Pattern Rows within the border…the stitches outside the border squares are not worked at all.  Make sure to simply read each row from right to left and work in a clockwise direction.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 4, plus 2 extra stitches at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1: *k2, TWA, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 2:  k all sts.

Row 3: *TWA, k2, rep from * to last 2 sts, TWA.

Row 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rows 1-4 until desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 4):

Round 1:  *k2, TWA, rep from * to end.

Round 2: k all sts.

Round 3: *TWA, k2, rep from * to end.

Round 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rounds 1-4 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

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Aug 7, 2017

Stitchology 35: Scalloped Shells

Can’t you just feel the sea breezes, hear the surf, and feel the sand in your toes just from looking at this month’s Scalloped Shells stitch? It may look complicated, but is fairly simple to do, especially using the stitch breakdown and the tutorial video you’ll find below.  Happy summer looming!   Something to note: even though this stitch works up in natural waves, it can still be used as a square for blankets, if you so desire.  This square would be a terrific one to place at the top and bottom edges with the scallop sides out, or you could simply block it so that the bottom is in a straight line for easier seaming together with other afghan blocks. ;)

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

This stitch uses a multiple of 11 pegs (stitch itself expands to 15 loops per repeat, see the instructions on how to accomplish this on only 11 pegs.)

All knit stitches use the true knit stitch or “reverse purl”.

Double YO: E-wrap yarn around peg twice, KO, leaving the 2 wraps on peg.

KO: knit off (lift bottom loop over top loop and completely over the top of the peg)

Sl: slip (skip peg, do not work)

WY: working yarn

Wyib: working yarn carried to the back of the peg

YO: lay working yarn across the front of the peg.

K5tog: Lay WY on top of all loops on peg and KO one at a time.

 

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 11. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Rows 1-3: knit

Row 4: purl

Row 5: *[k1, yo] twice, k1, [double yo] 5 times, [k1, yo] twice, k1; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 1: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 1.)

Peg 2: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 2.)

Peg 3: knit

Pegs 4-8: EW peg twice, KO bottom loop over 2 wrapped loops.

Peg 9: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 9.)

Peg 10: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 10.)

Peg 11: knit.

Repeat from * to end of row.

Row 6: *p5, wyib sl 5, p5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 11: purl.

Peg 10: purl the top loop and move to peg 11. Purl the bottom loop.

Peg 9: purl the top loop and move to peg 10. Purl the bottom loop.

Pegs 8-4: beginning with peg 4 and working to peg 8, unwrap each double EW and place on a stitch holder/cable needle.

Move loop from peg 9 to peg 7. Move the top loop from peg 10 to peg 8. Move the bottom loop from peg 10 to peg 9. Move the top loop from peg 11 to peg 10.  Pull out any extra slack in stitches just moved.

Peg 6: Place the held loops one at a time, beginning with the loop on the far left onto peg 6 (make sure they are not twisted).  Carry WY behind all the sts on peg 6.

Peg 5: Purl the stitch on peg 3 and move to peg 5.

Peg 4: Purl the top loop on peg 2 and move to peg 4.

Peg 3: Purl the bottom loop on peg 2 and move to peg 3.

Peg 2: Purl the top loop on peg 1 and move to peg 2.

Peg 1: purl. Remove any extra slack from stitches 1-5.

Repeat from * to end of row.

Row 7: *k5, wyib sl 5, k5; rep from * to end.

Row 8: *k5, k5tog, k5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Pegs 11-7: knit.

                Peg 6: Lay WY on top of all loops on peg 6 and KO one at a time.

Pegs 5-1: knit.

Repeat from * to end of row.

Rep rows 1-8 for desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 11):

Rounds 1-3: knit

Round 4: purl

Round 5: *[k1, yo] twice, k1, [double yo] 5 times, [k1, yo] twice, k1; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 1: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 1.)

Peg 2: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 2.)

Peg 3: knit

Pegs 4-8: EW peg twice, KO bottom loop over 2 wrapped loops.

Peg 9: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 9.)

Peg 10: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 10.)

Peg 11: knit.

Repeat from * to end of round.

Round 6: *p5, wyib sl 5, p5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 1: move the loop on the top temporarily to peg 2. Purl the bottom loop.

Peg 2: purl the top loop and move back to peg 1. Move the next loop temporarily to peg 3. Purl the bottom loop.

Peg 3: purl the top loop and move back to peg 2. Purl the bottom loop.

Pegs 4-8: beginning with peg 4 and working to peg 8, unwrap each double EW and place on a stitch holder/cable needle.

Move loop from peg 9 to peg 7. Move the top loop from peg 10 to peg 8. Move the bottom loop from peg 10 to peg 9. Move the top loop from peg 11 to peg 10.  Pull out any extra slack in stitches just moved.

Peg 9: Place the held loops one at a time, beginning with the loop on the far left onto peg 6 (make sure they are not twisted).  Carry WY behind all the sts on peg 6.

Pegs 7-11: purl

Repeat from * to end of round.

Round 7: *k5, wyib sl 5, k5; rep from * to end.

Round 8: *k5, k5tog, k5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Pegs 1-5: knit.

                Peg 6: Lay WY on top of all loops on peg 6 and KO one at a time.

Pegs 7-11: knit.

Repeat from * to end of round.

Rep rows 1-8 for desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

  • Need a book on what stitches mean and how to do them

  • There are a ton of sources for learning all the stitches out there. :) Here is a link to the How-To section of KnittingBoard.com: http://www.knittingboard.com/loom-knitting-how-tos/ There is also a tab at this same site that contains video instructions as well. Another excellent source for beginning loom knitting is the book by Isela Phelps, Loom Knitting Primer, which can be found in some craft stores, as well as Amazon.

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Jul 17, 2017

Loom FAQs: What Is A Burn Test? Why Burn Yarn At All?

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have all been there.  Go to a thrift store or yard sale and find a stash of yarn being sold for dirt cheap.  Cannot pass it up because IT IS DIRT CHEAP.  And better yet, it’s clean and usable yarn.  Doesn’t have an odor or feel weird.  Appears to be clean and ready to use.  Might still wash it after the project is made though…

But one thing is missing.  The label.  On several of the skeins.  And since there is such a variety of different kinds of yarn in that stash, there is no way of being certain that is the same kind of yarn.  It feels or looks different from anything else you have.

Or you are not the lucky sort to find these kind of deals and just end up buy a bag of mill ends that is still a mystery even though you bought it at a retail store.

What is it?  What kind of fiber is this mystery yarn?  Will I be able to block it?  Can I use it as a gift for someone who is allergic to wool?  How can I find out what the fiber content of this wonderfully cheap mystery yarn actually is??

Well you are in luck.  There are ways to find out the fiber content of yarn.  And it’s fun too.  BY BURNING IT.  Why would I burn it?  Then I wouldn’t have it.  Well you don’t burn the entire thing.  Just a small piece.

Please note!!  Please take every precaution about using open flames in your home so that your entire stash doesn’t burn with the rest of the house.  I mean, we all love firefighters.  And calendars of shirtless firefighters.  Just don’t go and try to meet all from the firehouse all at once by accident…  And please do not use me as an excuse to your significant other as a reason there was a fire in your home or why you have burned your hand.  But Renita said you can burn the yarn to see what it’s made of!!  It’s her fault.  Just use some common sense before setting anything at all on fire.  Even a candle.

What is a burn test?

A burn test is a simple way to tell if the yarn is 1 of 3 fiber types, synthetic (acrylic, nylon, etc.), plant base (cotton, linen, bamboo, rayon, etc.), or animal (wool, silk, alpaca, angora, etc.)

Why can I not tell between different types of animal or plant?

Since all of each fiber types will burn the same, there isn’t a way to tell between the different animals or plants or man-made fibers.  While some people can tell between silk and wool, the way those burn will remain the same.

How do I do a burn test?

First you will need to take all safety precautions like mentioned earlier.  A bowl or sink full of water is a great way to start.  If you are more accident prone, go ahead and have that fire extinguisher out and ready that we are all to have already in our kitchens.  Never hurts to have that handy just in case.

Then you will need to cut off a piece of the yarn.  About 6″ to 12″ will suffice.  Want it long enough to see how it burns and how easy it is to put out.  But not too long or too short that you can lose control easily.

Then light one end of the yarn on fire using a match, lighter, or other open flame while holding it over the prepared water.  You may need to use the water to put the flame out if blowing on it like a candle doesn’t work.  Or the flame gets out of the control and you really need to just drop it.  That water is going to come in handy.  Just take my word for it…

Do NOT pinch the flame out with your fingers!!  If the yarn is synthetic, you are basically burning plastic and run the risk of the melted plastic adhering to your fingers.  Not something you want to happen.

What does it tell me when I do a burn test?

Below are the results of burning each fiber type.

Each type will have different results in how it smells, how it burns and if it extinguishes itself or must be extinguished by you, and the way it burns and whether it produces ash or not.

And yes.  I have conducted the burn test myself and have smelled each one.

Synthetic (acrylic, nylon, etc.)

– smells like burnt plastic

– the flame will burn fast and will continue to burn until it is extinguished by blowing it out or submerging it in water

– the burnt end will not turn to ash and will harden like melted plastic while turning black

Plant (cotton, linen, bamboo, rayon, etc.)

– smells like burnt linen which it should especially if it’s linen…, (I saw it described that way before and just had to include that sweet little nugget of information…) In other words, it has a “clean” smell when burnt

– the flame will continue to burn until it is extinguished and is easy to extinguish like a candle wick by blowing t out

– the burnt end turns to fine ash like burnt paper ash

Animal (wool, silk, alpaca, angora, etc.)

– smells like burnt hair

– flame will almost immediately die out on it’s own without the need to extinguish, if it doesn’t then it may be a blend

– leaves crisp, crunchy ash that is larger, may stick together until broken apart, and not fine like plant fiber

What if the yarn is a blend?

Usually the burn test will determine the highest of the fiber content used.  It may or may not burn differently depending on the content of each fiber when it’s a blend.  There is not a sure fire way to know what the percentage of each fiber is.  Did you see what I did there…  

If the yarn is plied with multiple strands, you may try separating the strands and conducting the burn test on each strand.  Sometimes with blends, the strands that are plied together are actually different fibers.  Most times though all the different fibers are carded together before they are spun.

One way to tell if it’s a blend is by looking closely at the colors in the strand.  If the strand of yarn has slightly different shades of the same color, it is most likely a blend of more than one fiber.  Different fibers take color dye differently causing a variation of color shade in the same strand of yarn.

Can I try it on something I know first?

A great way to know what it looks like and smells like when burnt is to do a burn test on yarn you already know the fiber content.  Trying to describe how it smells and looks is harder than it sounds, and everyone smells things differently.

 

While the burn test will not give the most definitive answers, it will narrow down the fiber type tremendously making it easier to know how to use, block, and clean the finished projects made with the mystery yarn.

For more answers regarding the yarn weight of the mystery yarn, please check out my previous article Loom FAQs:  What Is WPI And Yarn Weights?

Now you know basically what the yarn is and are ready to cast on your loom.  Well get going!  Happy loom knitting!!

1 Comment

  • i was wondering after i e wrap and i have too do a purl stich next do i cast on again too make 2 on the peg ?

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Jul 3, 2017

Stitchology 34: Double Andalusian Stitch

This month we feature a stitch with a rhythmic and almost calming repeating pattern of simple knits and purls. The Double Andalusian Stitch, sometimes called the Ridge Rib Stitch, is wonderfully versatile and can provide that perfect amount of interest to any project at hand.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

 

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

*Note: The stitches in the chart that are bordered with darker lines are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.

When working a Flat Panel, the stitches outside the border square are worked only once: at the end of the odd rows, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed and at the beginning of the even rows, before the Repeating Pattern Rows are worked and repeated.

When working in the Round, only repeat the 3 stitches of the Repeat Pattern Rows within the border…the stitches outside the border squares are not worked at all.  Make sure to simply read each row from right to left and work in a clockwise direction.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 3, plus 1 extra stitch at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Rows 1 & 2: k all sts.

Row 3:  *k1, p2, rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rows 1-4 until desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 3):

Rounds 1 & 2: k all sts.

Round 3: *k1, p2, rep from * to end.

Round 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rounds 1-4 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

11 Comments

  • I am asking about the sea coral cap. Crown I am confused

    I move stitch 1 to peg2 Do I knit off?

    Next part I do not understand If I am correct I have empty odd begs? I do not understand B/o the even pegs

    Thank you for your help

  • Hi Betty :) The best thing to do to get the original designer’s attention, and to help those that come along behind you reading the comments for questions they may have, is to place your comment at the bottom of the post that you are referring to. This just helps everyone in the long run and is more effective to reach your particular designer for answers. ;)

    Although I did not write the Sea Coral Cap pattern, I think I can answer your question…

    In the crown, it looks like Denice is having you do a less bulky gathered BO. The gathered BO is what is normally used to cinch in the top of a hat. She is just saying to first thread through all the odd pegs, tighten that a bit, then to thread back through all the even pegs. You will then remove the hat from the loom and cinch in the first pegs gathered all the way, then proceed with the 2nd group of pegs. You can close any resulting hole at the top by neatly stitching closed.

    I hope this helps!
    Bethany~

  • Sorry Betty I just now saw your comment. Thank you Bethany for answering. She is right. Its just to decrease half the peg count so when you run the yarn to gather it will be less bulky.

  • Bethany,
    I have been following your “Stitchology” square offereings since the beginning. I am a bit confused and hope for assistance. I know you have gone to a new format but I still wish to use the stitches to create a square (want to use all I have completed so far for a blanket). Have just started on the Stitchology 34 double andalusian stitch and am confused with the pattern. No mention is made of “Set Up Rows” as in the past. Usually they always were a few rows of knit, purl, knit to create a border around the square. If I want my squares to be pieced together into a blanket, should I start all squares as in the past and do the first few rows of knit, purl, knit to create a matching border (I would think they would be easier to join if all are alike). But, want to be sure as I have not looked at all the patterns yet and should no mention be made in the future patterns about these “Set Up Rows”, I would like to know how to continue with the pattern, or if added with they change the pattern? Thank you, Marilyn

  • Which gage works best for the double Andalusian stitch? Mine seems way to tight.

  • Hi Marilyn :) I’m so happy to hear you’ve been following along with us on the squares!

    Due to this new format and the extra time involved with creating the video, an entire pattern for the square will not be posted here. But currently, you can find all the charts for the 8″ x 8″ squares since the new format began (Feb 2017: Lacy Hearts) and yarn information at the Ravelry page for each stitch. You should be able to follow along with the chart to make the entire squares. http://www.ravelry.com/designers/bethany-a-dailey

    As for the Set Up Rows, even though the pattern will be written for the stitches specifically, rather than the entire square, there still may be some listed with certain stitches. It all depends on the stitch pattern itself. If there are rows that are required to “set up” the stitch, but are not included in the repeating pattern rows/stitches, there will be set up rows listed. If there are no rows needed to set up the stitch itself, as in this month’s feature, you won’t see the Set Up Row section. ;)

    I hope this will helps explain things a bit better. I’m so glad to know you’re knitting gorgeous stitches along with us and hope you’ll share the progress of your blanket with us at either our KB Facebook page, or through the stitch listings at Ravelry! :)
    Bethany~

  • Hi Char :) I don’t think the ply really matters…using the proper weight of yarn for your desired loom to achieve the proper gauge is what counts. You can create this stitch using any weight of yarn really, even the the super heavy weight that is popular now-a-days, as long as it works with your loom. For the loom featured in the video (KB Hat Loom) I am using worsted weight #4.

    The other thing that will impact the way the stitch is turning out is how much your are pulling on your working yarn as you knit. When I use the U-stitch as you can see in the video, I am making sure that the “u” shape that I’ve built into each stitch will not be disturbed when knitting the next peg in line. Sometimes I’ve seen knitters placing too much tension on their working yarn, so that the little bit of looseness that was created in the stitch before is accidentally pulled out when creating the next stitch, resulting in stitches that are too tight for the desired stitch pattern. Try to concentrate on not disturbing the stitches done before; only gently laying the working yarn across and behind the peg, then lifting that loop over with a simple little flip. Does that makes sense? If you still can’t get the tension you desire with the U-stitch, you might try using the traditional true knit stitch, or “reverse purl”, which tends to result in a stitch that is just a little bit looser.

    I hope this helps!
    Bethany~

  • can i use my afgan loom for it stitchology

  • Hi Opal :) I don’t see why you couldn’t use your afghan loom!

  • Thank you for your help. I am a newbie to loom knitting or any kind knitting.
    I am learning to make prayer shawls for church on a loom. Have mostly done double
    Knitting but trying to learn single knitting. I think you are right I pull to tight. Hope to try
    This stitch on the KB hat loom for a shawl . Not sure if it will be big enough for a shawl
    Though. Trial and error that’s me. The stitch looks pretty and I need easy. Knitting is
    Suppose to be fun and relaxing not stressful!
    Guess I will see what happens! Thanks. Char

  • Hi Char…I’m glad I could help! I think the hat loom when adjusted to its fullest settings would be fine for a rectangular shawl. I think this stitch would be very nice featured in a shawl…have fun with it! :D

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Jun 19, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Work Beads Into My Projects

 

 

 

 

 

After people get the hang of loom knitting beanies and scarves, the desire to expand their knowledge of different techniques grows.  In social media, I see questions for all sorts of things.  Among them are How do I knit with beads?  Do I need to string the beads first?  Can I add beads as I go?

Different people have different methods for attaching beads to their loom knit projects.  Today I will demonstrate 3 different ways to attach beads.  Other people may have other methods.

Let’s start with beads and go from there!

What kind of beads do I need to use?

You can use any kind of bead that you can fit your yarn though.  Most people I have seen in loom knitting tend to use pony beads.  Those are the larger plastic beads found in the kids crafts that have really large holes.  But you are not limited to those alone.  While you will need to use beads with larger holes on thicker yarn, you might actually be surprised what beads you can use when I show you how I thread them onto the yarn.

Do I need to use a beading needle to thread the beads on the yarn?  

I have made jewelry for years now.  I have used all sorts of beading needles.  One of my favorites is the needle that is made of twisted wire with an eye that will collapse shut after being threaded.  Very inexpensive to buy.  But not always the best when threading yarn through beads.  And as for the tapestry needles used to weave in the ends, those are always too big for beads unless you are using pony beads.

What do I use then if not a beading needle?

Dental floss.  WHAT??  Yes.  I like to use dental floss to thread my beads on the yarn.  I would like to mention that I use dental floss straight from the container that is unused…  I am all for recycling, but reusing dental floss is a bit much for me.

What kind of dental floss?

I prefer using the unflavored waxed dental floss.  No need to have mint flavored yarn.  And the dye they use on the flavored floss might stain the yarn.  Not sure.  But don’t want to chance it.

I like waxed because it makes it easier for ends of the floss to stick together and go through the hole of the bead.

What if I only have unwaxed floss?

You can use unwaxed if you have some beeswax or beading thread conditioner that you can coat the ends of the floss.  But if you have the thread conditioner, you might happen to have beading thread which you can use in the place of the floss.  Like using the floss because it’s a bit easier to work with.  Especially if it’s waxed.

But waxed dental floss is very inexpensive and therefore not a struggle to afford.

How do I add the beads?  Before or as I go?   Do both methods look the same?  Or different?

The way the beads look on the finished piece will definitely vary with the way the beads are added.  Let’s talk about each way and see how the beads look when the work is finished.

Adding Beads Before Starting

The easiest way would be to string all the beads you will need before starting to knit.

You will need to make sure you have enough or more than you will need.  If not, you will need to cut the yarn, add more beads, and join the new yarn leaving you will extra ends to weave in later.

Also if you are using more than 1 color bead and are wanting to create a pattern with the color, you will need to make sure they are strung on the yarn in the order that you will need them so that the first one you will need will be last one you will string onto the yarn and the last you will will need will be the first you will string onto the yarn.

How to thread the beads on the yarn

 

 

First remove a piece of floss from the spool about 10″ to 12″ long so that when folded in half you have about 6″ of floss to work with.

 

 

 

 

 

Run the 2 ends of the floss between your fingers so they will stick together.

Thread the end of the floss through the bead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gently pull the yarn through the bead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue stringing the beads onto the yarn until all the beads you will need are on the working yarn.  As I have mentioned already, having more than you need is always better than not having enough.  Just keep the beads pushed down the yarn.

If the end of the floss starts to fray, just trim it or replace with a new piece.

 

 

 

Start your knitting with the end of the yarn.  Keep pushing the beads on down the yarn until you need them.

 

 

 

When you are ready to use a bead, put it in between the 2 pegs where you want it to go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work the next stitch leaving the bead between the pegs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This method is great when you want to place a bead between every stitch.

 

 

 

 

With this method, you need to remember that the yarn will run through the hole of the bead horizontally with only 1 strand of yarn through the bead.

 

 

 

If you are using all knits, the beads will try to hide behind the stitches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The beads will be more prominent when worked with purls stitches on either side of the bead instead of knits.

It’s good to keep that in mind when adding beads to your work.

 

 

 

Adding Beads As You Go

This method is great when you don’t really know how many beads you will need because you are just winging it by placing beads randomly or just don’t want to count them out.  No judgement on that last one…  Nope.  Been there.  Done that.

First thing to remember about both of these methods is that when beads are added as you go, the stitch itself will run through the bead vertically with both strands of the stitch, not horizontally with only 1 strand like the previous method.

Method 1

 

 

When adding a bead onto the stitch, you will need to first draw up the the new stitch like working a true knit stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completely remove the old stitch from the peg and run the dental floss through the new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

String the bead onto the floss and then onto the loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten up the loop after getting the bead down behind the peg and place the loop onto the peg itself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bead is now on the peg with the new stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This method will leave a “hole” on each side of the bead since the stitch itself is sort of cinched through the hole of the bead.

Therefore, I would not recommend using this method on every stitch.  But at least skipping a stitch between each bead.

 

 

 

 

Method 2

 

 

With the second method of adding beads as you go, draw up a new stitch but unlike Method 1 do not remove the stitch from the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As before, run the floss through the loop and run the bead onto the loop.

But this time the bead will be in front of the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place the new loop onto the peg after tightening up the loop so there is not any slack.

Remember to not take the old loop off the peg so that there are 2 loops on the peg with the bead in front of the peg.

Continue with the rest of the row.

 

 

 

 

 

On the next row when the peg with the bead is ready to be worked,  PURL that stitch so the the bead will be to the front of the work.

If you knit the stitch, the bead will be at the back of the work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There may be a tiny gap at the top and bottom of the bead, but with this method the bead will sit nicely in front of the fabric.

 

 

 

Like I said before, different people have different ways to add beads to embellish their knits.  I hope any of these ways will help when you decide to use beads with your loom knitting projects as well.

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May 15, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Bind Off In Pattern? Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does “bind off in pattern” mean?  This is actually a question I haven’t seen in loom knitting at all.  But having seen “bind off in pattern” in needle knitting has really got me to thinking about binding off and different methods to bind off.

The most common bind off in loom knitting is the basic bind off.  This bind off is a great bind off for keeping the tension loose as you work the bind off instead of having to remember to work the previous row looser than normal.  But it does add an extra row of knit at the end.

This has prompted me to expand the basic bind off method to include purl stitch so the last row of purl can be the bind off when working garter stitch or even being able to use the basic bind off on ribbing or other stitch patterns  that isn’t all knits.  Which is where “bind off in pattern” comes into play.

Now let’s revisit the Basic Bind Off and then discuss how to bind off in pattern.  And then we will discuss how to make the Basic Bind Off more stretchy by adding a chain stitch between the bind off stitches without using a crochet hook.

 

Basic Bind Off – Original with Knit Stitch

Chain edge of the Basic Bind Off

 

The Basic Bind Off is always worked with the working yarn and gives a nice chain edge that matches the Chain Cast On.  And also matches the side edges when using the slip stitch.  More on using the slip stitch to create a nice chain edge in Loom FAQs:  To Slip or Not To Slip? That is the Frequently Asked Question

 

 

 

 

Now let’s discuss how to work the Basic Bind Off using all knit stitches like we all know and love.

The bind off is worked over 2 pegs at a time.  We will call them peg 1 and peg 2.

 

 

Step 1:  Knit peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2:  Knit peg 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3:  Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now there are 2 stitches on peg 1 and peg 2 is empty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4:  Lift the bottom loop on peg 1 over the top loop leaving only 1 stitch on peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 5:  Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 6:  Now rename the pegs so that the first peg with a stitch is peg 1 and the next is peg 2.

 

 

 

 

 

Repeat steps 2 – 6 until only 1 peg has a stitch.  Cut the working yarn leaving a tail long enough to weave in and pull the tail through the last stitch to remove it from the loom.

 

Basic Bind Off with Garter Stitch ending on the Knit Row

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Bind Off – In Pattern including Purl Stitch

What does bind off in pattern mean exactly?  It means that the stitches worked on the basic bind off match the stitches in the stitch pattern used.

Wait…  What????

Here is where the explanation gets a bit trickier, but I will do the best I can.

Say the project being worked on is in garter stitch.  And you want to bind off on the purl row instead of working the purl row then binding off with that extra row of knit.

You will then need to work the basic bind off but purl the stitches instead of knitting them.

 

Basic Bind Off with Garter Stitch ending on the purl row

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or you are ending a project in rib stitch.  Then you would need to work each stitch on the bind off to match the rib stitch for that row.

 

Basic Bind Off using Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Bind Off with Rib Stitch while Stretched

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or you are using the seed stitch.  You will need to work each stitch of the bind off to match the seed stitch for that row.

Those previous 3 examples are what it means to bind off in pattern.  Your bind off matches your stitch pattern.

Now let’s try to write it out without it getting too confusing.

The bind off is still worked over 2 pegs at a time.  We will still call them peg 1 and peg 2.

Step 1:  Using the stitch that will keep the stitch pattern going for the row, work peg 1.

Step 2:  Then work peg 2 in the stitch pattern.

If it is garter and you are binding off on the purl row, then you will purl peg 1 and peg 2.  If it’s a 1×1 rib with the first stitch on the row being knit and the second stitch being purl, then you will knit peg 1 and purl peg 2.  Or whatever stitch pattern you are using.

Step 3:  Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.  Now there are 2 stitches on peg 1 and peg 2 is empty.

Step 4:  Lift the bottom loop on peg 1 over the top loop leaving only 1 stitch on peg 1.

Step 5:  Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2.

Step 6:  Now rename the pegs so that the first peg with a stitch is peg 1 and the next is peg 2.  Just remember that you will need to keep up with which peg needs a knit or a purl depending on what your stitch pattern is.

Repeat steps 2 – 6 until only 1 peg has a stitch.  Cut the working yarn leaving a tail long enough to weave in and pull the tail through the last stitch to remove it from the loom.

 

Basic Bind Off – Added Chain Stitch Between Bind Off Stitches

Sometimes it is hard to keep the tension loose enough so that the bind off is not too tight.  We all struggle with that.

What I always recommend is when working the bind off, make sure the stitch is very loose to the point you think it will be too loose.  But it is hard to keep all the stitches the same as you work them.

 

 

Here is a variation of the basic bind off where a chain stitch is added between each stitch giving the bind off edge more stretch.  And best part is a crochet hook is not need to work this bind off.

 

 

 

 

 

But this bind off will leave a little hole between each stitch because of the extra chain between the stitches.

 

 

 

 

 

Note:  I will use “knit” for the stitch to work each peg.  But purl stitch can also be used on any peg to bind off in pattern except when an e-wrap knit is used to make the extra chain.

The bind off is worked over 2 pegs at a time.  We will call them peg 1 and peg 2.

Step 1:  Knit peg 1.

 

 

Step 2:  E-wrap knit peg 1 again by bringing the working yarn behind peg 1 again and knitting over.  This is what creates the extra chain stitch.

 

 

 

 

Step 3:  Knit peg 2.

Step 4:  Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.  Now there are 2 stitches on peg 1 and peg 2 is empty.

Step 5:  Lift the bottom loop on peg 1 over the top loop leaving only 1 stitch on peg 1.

Step 6:  Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2.

Step 7:  Now rename the pegs so that the first peg with a stitch is peg 1 and the next is peg 2.

Repeat steps 2 – 7 until only 1 peg has a stitch.  Cut the working yarn leaving a tail long enough to weave in and pull the tail through the last stitch to remove it from the loom.

 

Now that the Basic Bind Off has been expanded to include more than just knit stitches, the bind off world is endless.  Just remember to keep in mind your tension so the bind off edge is not too tight.

Keep on loom knitting!

1 Comment

  • I was working on a rib pattern and I tried binding off in pattern using your excellent tutorial and it turned out fantastic. I hope this tutorial will be permanently stored in the “Learn” section of the web site. Actually there are many of these types of learning tutorials that would be easier for beginners to find if they were all stored in one place. Thank you for teaching us this nice techinque.

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May 1, 2017

Diagonal Cross Stitch: Stitchology 32

Our newest venture into loom knitting stitch discovery is this lovely design that creates an amazingly plush and reversible fabric.  Feel free to use this for pretty much any type of project, as it is beautiful when viewed on either side. While this technique will employ the use of a cable needle, it doesn’t actually have any cables. The tool will be used to slip one stitch over 3 others to create the slightly honeycomb feel of this design. Let’s get started!

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

 

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The yo-3 in this pattern involves slipping the yo loop over 3 stitches. This begins by creating a new loop which will be used as the yo loop.  In the charts, this is noted over the span of 3 sts/squares. In the instructions for the Repeating Pattern Rows, it is written like this: yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked.

To do this, follow the below instructions:

1. yo-3 peg: place the working yarn (wy) under the loop already on the peg as if to purl.  Pull the wy up through the loop to create a new loop. Place this new loop temporarily on the 2nd peg before the yo-3 peg.  (For example: work from right to left: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  Yo-3 peg in this example is on peg 3. Create new loop and bring new loop behind peg 2, and place temporarily on peg 1.)

2. yo-3 peg: U-stitch the yo-3 peg. (For our example: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  Yo-3 peg in this example is on peg 3. U-stitch peg.)

3. Purl next peg. (For our example:  6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  Purl peg 4.)

4. U-stitch next peg. (For our example: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  U-stitch peg 5.)

5. Place 3 worked pegs (For our example: pegs 3-5) in order onto the left side of a cable needle.  Place new loop being held (For our example: on peg 1) onto far right side of cable needle.

6. Slip the new loop at the right over all three loops at the left, as well as entirely over the top of the cable needle.

7. Replace 3 held loops back onto pegs in order (For our example: pegs 3-5).

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

Repeating Pattern Rows- Flat Panel

Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches- Worked in the Round

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The stitches in both charts that are bordered with darker squares are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.  The stitches below the border squares are set-up rows to be worked only once, before the repeating rows. In the Flat Panel Chart, the stitches after the border square are worked only once at the end, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed. In the chart for working in the Round, there are stitches before and after the border squares that are worked only once: before all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Stitches, and after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Stitches, as are shown in each row of the chart.

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 4, plus 2 extra stitches at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rows

Row 1:  *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 2:  *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 3: *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to last 2 sts, k1, p1.

Row 4:  *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 5:   k1, p1, *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 6: *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rows 3-6 until desired length.

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 4):

Set-Up Rounds

Rounds 1 & 2: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rounds

Round 3: *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 4: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 5:  S1 with working yarn behind, p1, *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to last 2 sts.  The last stitch of round will carry over to the 1st peg of the same round (which was previously slipped): yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked.

Round 6: Begin on peg 2: p1, *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rounds 3-6 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

4 Comments

  • Would like to have the larger chart you briefly showed in the video that apparently was used in your sample…love the stitch and am anxious to try it…thanks.

  • Hi Marie :)

    Due to this new format and the extra time involved with creating the video, an entire pattern for the square will not be posted here. But currently, you can find the charts for the 8? x 8? squares since the new format began (Feb 2017: Lacy Hearts) and yarn information at the Ravelry page for each stitch. I hope this will help you to make gorgeous stitches with us! :) http://www.ravelry.com/designers/bethany-a-dailey

    Bethany~

  • Hi Bethany, I fell in love with this pattern and I am going to try it on a 90 peg loom repeating the pattern 44 times and the 2 extra pegs. I’m uncertain what cast on to use, but I want to try the cable cast on that matches needle cast on that I learned on good knit kisses you tube videos. Thank you for such a beautiful pattern.

  • Oh, wonderful, Jessie! :D I will look forward to seeing how your piece comes out! As for a cast on, the cable cast on I’m sure will work just dandy. My personal favorite is the chain cast on, which matches the basic bind off beautifully. :)

    Have fun with this!
    Bethany~

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Apr 30, 2017

Whirly Bookmark

Sometimes quick and simple make the best gifts.  Bookmarks are a gift that most anyone can use.  Pretty yarn and very little time can make a stunning Whirly Bookmark making it great for end of the year teachers’ gifts as well as gifts for any holiday or birthday.

 

LOOM:  Sock Loom EFG

YARN: 2 yds of 2 weight yarn.   Lion Brand Bonbons in Celebrate used in sample.

NOTIONS:  knitting tool, tapestry needle

GAUGE:  n/a

SIZE:  Approximately 12” in length

ABBREVIATIONS

CO=Cast on

Rep=repeat

K=knit

INSTRUCTIONS

Curlicue Instructions

Step 1:  e-wrap K peg 1, 4 times

Step 2:  figure 8 wrap (see 2 Peg I-Cord Instructions) both pegs and K over, one time

Rep steps 1 & 2 until the curlicue is the length stated in the pattern.  Curls may need to be worked into place by hand.

2 Peg I-Cord Instructions

Step 1:  Wrap both pegs in a figure 8 by bringing the working yarn behind peg 1, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2, then behind peg 2, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2.  K over.

Rep step 1 until the i-cord is the length stated in the pattern.

Bookmark

Using 2 strands of yarn held together as one, CO 2 pegs by placing the slip knot on peg 1 and wrapping peg 2   Wrap both pegs in a figure 8 by bringing the working yarn behind peg 1, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2, then behind peg 2, around the front and between pegs 1 and 2.  Knit over.

Step 1:  Work Curlicue Instructions (above) until the work curls and is about 1” long.

Step 2:  Work a 2 peg i-cord until the work is approx. 10” from the end.

Note:  If a shorter or longer bookmark is desired, knit the i-cord to the desired length before the next step.

Step 3:  Work Curlicue Instructions until the work curls and is about 12” from the end (top curl should be only 2” long).

BO by moving the stitch on peg 1 to peg 2, lift bottom loop over top, cut the working yarn leaving a tail to weave in, pull the tail through the final loop.

Weave in ends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Comment

  • I notice that the 38″ knitting board is available in June 2017. Has it been redesigned? Do the pegs have the groove in them? I just bought one from Amazon thinking that it was discontinued and was disappointed that there are no grooves to guide the pick and it is so much heavier than the other looms, even thought it is longer. Was just surprised.

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Apr 18, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Price My Work To Sell?

 

 

 

 

 

Lots of people who love any of the fiber arts end up wanting to sell their work.  Sometimes it is because they run out of people to make things for as gifts.  Or because they have a friend that has asked them to make something in particular.  Or sometimes it’s a simple matter of making money to help pay the bills.

This always leads to questions.  How do I price my work?  Am I asking too much because people seemed surprised when I mention the price?  Why am I not selling anything when my prices are low?

While there is nothing really set in stone on how to price handmade items, let’s discuss various ways to go about finding that right price for your items.

What It’s Worth VS. What People Will Pay

When pricing handmade items made of yarn, the first most obvious way is to keep up with the number of hours spent working on the item, multiplying that by an hourly wage, then adding cost of materials used.

Problem with that is even when using minimum wage, the price most likely will be more than most people are willing to pay or can even afford to pay.  This doesn’t mean that you don’t deserve that price for the items.  We all deserve to be paid more for our work than we can ever sell them for.

So what should I do?

Using The Cost of Supplies As a Guide

Another way to calculate price is to take the cost of yarn used for the project and multiple that by 2 or 3.

This method is used most often.  I like to multiply the cost of yarn by 3 because I do not want to undersell myself.  If the item is very time consuming due to it being a complex pattern, I will always add $10 to $50 depending on the size of the item and how long it took to complete.

But that seems too high to ask.

Most people do tend to under price their items.  They think that people will not pay a higher price for their work.

Let me just say this.  Never underestimate the value of your work.

Some people will not buy an item if they think it’s too cheap.  They may think you use inferior yarn.  Or that there is something wrong with it.

But people complain about it being too high, and they are able to buy it at a store cheaper.

There is always people who will complain about the price.  If they think they can get the same exact item with the same exact quality for less at a store, I can guarantee they will be in for a huge surprise.  Machine or sweat shop made items are not high quality.  They will not hold up to time and wear.

In other words, they will get what they pay for.

But I bought my yarn on sale.  Do I use that price?

If you buy your yarn on sale, I would recommend not using that price, but the regular price the yarn retails for.  That way if you need to make the same item again with the same yarn but need to buy more, your price will already cover the yarn not being on sale at that time.

Compare Prices

If you are still unsure of what to charge for something, look on the selling sites for similar items and see what those are selling for.  Then you can price your items accordingly.

Geographic Area Dictates Price As Well

Don’t forget that items that sell for higher prices in places that are known for artists and tourism will not sell for as much in small towns and lower populated areas.  Also places where the income is lower will need to have lower prices on handmade items than in places where income is higher.

Therefore you should always take into consideration where you live, who you are selling to, and how much people can pay for handmade, unique items.

So how much should I charge?

When considering how much to charge for something, it really all comes down to 3 things:  location, price of supplies, and personal consideration.  Each person values their time and effort differently.  Therefore, it is a personal preference as to how much each item is worth when selling it.

Is it too high?  Is it priced too low??

Only you can be the judge of that.  Just because it doesn’t sell at a certain price does not mean it’s priced too high.  Only that the right person hasn’t seen it yet to buy it at that price.

Remember This

There will always be people who will complain about the price.  ALWAYS.  And there will always be people who will offer you a lower price.  Therefore it is better to price your items on the high side so you do have room to for those that offer less.

And if they still complain about the price being too high, here’s a suggestion on how to deal with them.  Already know how much the price for that same item is when using the hourly wage price calculation.  Then explain to them that if you were wanting to get paid a hourly rate for your work like they get paid at their job (tell them what that per hour rate is and how long it took to make the item along with cost of materials) that the price would be this amount instead (tell them the higher price) and that you are wanting to give them a price cut to begin with.

Most people really have no clue how long it takes to make these things.  While putting it into perspective for them may not cause them to pay the price you are asking, at least then they will now be enlightened.  Or not.  Some people can never be enlightened…

Just remember to not be rude.  State the facts in a matter of fact manner.  And always with a smile.  If you keep on smiling to rude people, it makes them feel uncomfortable.  I love doing that…

NEVER UNDER ESTIMATE THE VALUE OF YOUR WORK!!  Whatever you do, do NOT price your items too low.  Your time and effort is always worth more than you can ever earn for a certain piece.  Just consider it a gift to mankind at whatever price you sell it for because you will always deserve more than you earn.

After all, it is art.  Always.  ART.  No matter if it’s a hat, scarf, or blanket.  And whoever buys it will treasure it for what it is.  ART.  Love is put in every piece.  If even made just for selling, you love the craft, or you wouldn’t do it.  Not like you are working in a sweat shop with no option otherwise.

In short, again, YOU ARE WORTH IT.  Price your work accordingly.  Is it correct?  Yes.  If you are comfortable with the price, then it is correct.  Even then, it’s probably too low.  But as long as you are happy with what you are paid, then it’s worth it.  Don’t let others tell you otherwise.

And as a side note…  If you are taking a commission to make something for someone, please get at least half if not all the money up front.  That way you will not be out any money if they change their mind.  And NEVER give them the item until full payment is made.  I have seen so many lose money by trusting people to pay them after they receive the item.  Unfortunately, friendships have ended over this very thing.  Just be careful and get paid up front.

Keep on loom knitting those lovely projects whether they are for yourself, for loved ones as gifts, or for sell no matter what the reason.  YOU ARE WORTH EVERY PENNY!!!

4 Comments

  • I want the rest of the pattern for THE BALLERINA BABY SOCKS. It only gives instructions down to the heel and that’s it. I feel it should tell how long to knit from heel to toe and then the instructions to casting off or ending the socks. Otherwise the picture and the instructions to the heel is great but only half of the instructions are there. Thank you, Please send me the rest of the instructions.

  • I don’t know how you know what many of us are thinking. ? I have been wrestling with this question for a while myself. Thank you for your input. But, you didn’t offer any suggestions where.

  • Unfortunately this article was not about where to sell things. Only about pricing items. I am not in a position to endorse any website and other place to sell handmade items on this blog. Thank you for reading!

  • Nina,
    The entire pattern is there. Are you following this link? I can see the entire pattern on the page. Please let me know if you can’t find it. http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/3387

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Apr 15, 2017

Twisted Pearl Stitch (double knit)

Knitting in double knit with Rib stitches can create so many varieties, but each one is a new stitch to use in many applications.  Rib creates a very stretchy knit that retains its shape.

stitch_taupe

 

With the Twisted Pearl Stitch, the back of this stitch looks just the same so it is a good one for showing both sides.

Very pretty and similar to our traditional Rib, but you will find  that the ribs are tighter in this stitch, and the same on both sides.

The background weave shows an angle strand when the rib is opened. (See up close insert.)  Be sure to work with an even number of stitches.

 

twisted_purl_graph

 

 

 

 

 

0         1          2         3           4         5         6         7           8         9          10       11       12

Loom:  10” knitting loom or any loom with 22 + pegs with a width of 1 cm between rows of pegs.

Yarn:  Any #4 worsted weight yarn in wool, acrylic or blend. Sample square is knit with Lion Brand Heartland.

Abbreviations:  L=left, R=right

close up twisted

Close up detail of this stitch with color background.   

Instructions:

Cast On 22 stitches in pattern working L to R with at least (1) open peg to L of slip knot.

(Option would be to cast on with stockinette, lay anchor yarn, and wrap in pattern for row #1)

So, let’s see how it looks on the loom:  We are creating a square that is approximately 10″ X 10″ just to learn the new stitch.  When complete, makes a great wash cloth.

 

Step 1:  Start with a slip knot on peg 2 top.twisted_purl1

Step 2:  Wrap straight down around peg 2 bottom.

Step 3:  Bring yarn back to peg 1 and wrap around top peg from inside to outside and straight down around bottom peg #1.

Step 4:  Bring yarn from bottom peg 1 to top peg 4, wrap around top of peg and down to bottom peg 4 and wrap.

Step 5:  Go back to peg 3 top wrapping to L and down around the bottom peg.

Step 6:  You will see that the repeat is to skip a peg, wrap the next peg, top to bottom pegs straight down, and then go back to skipped peg and wrap the pegs around top, going straight down to bottom peg. Then repeat skipping the next stitch.

Step 7:  Work in this manner across the 22 pegs. Lay a piece of anchor yarn.

Turn the loom around, so that you are again working from L to R. This shows the return over the anchor yarn.

twisted_purl2

Move yarn to 2nd stitch and repeat the process starting with step 3.

Continue working this row for the design.

Stitches ready to hook over.

 

Row is complete

Row is complete.

 

 

 

 

 

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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Apr 3, 2017

Slip Stitch Braid: Stitchology 31

This lovely stitch is perfect for spring knitting.  It contains pretty braids that almost look woven in appearance.  This technique is created by using slipped stitches combined with 1 over 2 cables.  Don’t let those cables cause you any dismay, because they are super simple to work with the help of that elongated slipped stitch.  Repeated throughout a project, this stitch makes me think of baby knits, socks, or even a lovely hat (anything that the back isn’t going to necessarily be a feature).  Change the color every two rows and the look goes from delicate to Wow!

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

 

Special Stitch Instructions

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 5—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

**The stitch pattern does call for e-wrapping particular stitches. Wrap them, but do not knit them off until it is time to work these e-wraps into a row.  When it is time, knit off the stitch and then make sure to untwist the loop before working.

The cables in this pattern involve trading the loops of 3 pegs in the correct order. They consist of a 1 over 2 Right Cross [1/2RC] (a cable with the sts running to the right), and a 1 over 2 Left Cross [1/2LC] (a twist with the sts running to the left).  They are worked as follows:

[1/2RC]:  Worked over 3 pegs: Lift the 2 loops from the pegs on the right and place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the left and move it to the farthest peg on the right.  Place the 2 held loops onto the 2 pegs on the left.  With the working yarn, knit the 3 pegs.

[1/2LC]:  Worked over 3 pegs: Lift the 2 loops from the pegs on the left and place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the right and move it to the farthest peg on the left.  Place the 2 held loops onto the 2 pegs on the right.  With the working yarn, knit the 3 pegs.

*An easy way to remember which direction to go is to remember to hold the stitches onto a cable needle on the side of the directional slant.  So…for a right cable, hold the loops on the right.  For a left cable, hold the loops on the left.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

Slip Stitch Braid, Repeating Pattern

Slip Stitch Braid, Repeating Pattern with Color Stripes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The squares in the chart that are bordered with a pink square are the repeating pattern rows.  The squares outside the pink border are set-up rows to be worked only once, before the repeating rows. The chart on the right shows where to change colors, if an alternating color stitch is desired. 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rows

Row 1:  k all sts.

Row 2:  *EW1, k4, rep from * to end.

Row 3:  *k4, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 4: *S1, k2, EW1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 5: *k1, S1, 1/2RC, rep from * to end.

Row 6:  *EW1, k2, S1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 7:   *k1, 1/2LC, S1.

Repeat Rows 4-7 until desired length.

**Note:  When finishing the stitch pattern, omit the EW in the 2nd to last row and the S1 in the final row. 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rounds

Round 1:  k all sts.

Round 2:  *k4, EW1, rep from * to end.

Round 3: *k4, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rounds

Round 4: *k1, Ew1, k2, S1, rep from * to end.

Round 5: *k1, S1, 1/2RC, rep from * to end.

Round 6: *k1, S1, k2, EW1, rep from * to end.

Round 7:   *k1, 1/2LC, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rounds 4-7 until desired length.

**Note:  When finishing the stitch pattern, omit the EW in the 2nd to last round and the S1 in the final round. 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

  • Which cast on method would you use for this pattern?

  • Hi Margo :)

    You can use whichever cast on you prefer. My personal favorite and the one that I pretty much use every time is the Chain Cast On. I like this one because I feel it most closely matches the Basic Bind Off, which is my go-to bind off method. ;)
    Bethany~

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Mar 20, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Work A Different Color Border?

 

 

 

 

 

Lately I have been looking at a lot of different yarn for various projects.  But it can be overwhelming.  Which is one reason I love self-striping yarn.  I can make a hat or scarf with self-striping yarn and let the yarn work it’s own magic without the hassle of changing colors.

But sometimes, colorwork is desired.  While there are various methods of colorwork in loom knitting, one of the questions I have seen is How do I made the border of my afghan a different color from the middle?  Well you are in luck!  Making a flat panel with a different color border is not as hard as it sounds whether it be a scarf, afghan, dish cloth, or other flat panel.  And even better, there are not a lot of ends to weave in either if it’s done correctly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s get started!

What stitch pattern should I use?

The stitch pattern used for the border and body can be whatever you wish.

If you don’t want the edges to curl, you do need to use a stitch pattern for the border that is a combination of knits and purls.  The body or middle of the flat panel can be all knits or stockinette or any other stitch pattern.

You can even work the entire piece in one stitch pattern and just change the colors to create a border effect.

For more information on why the edges curl, please check out Loom FAQs:  Why Do Knits Curl?

If you would like more information on the 3 simplest and most common knit/purl combinations that do not curl, please check out Loom FAQs:  Is It Garter, Rib, or Seed Stitch?

But I don’t want to weave in a lot of ends or have to join the yarn ends!!

Oh I feel you!  I absolutely despise weaving in ends, detest knots, and don’t like the floats or carried strands of yarn across the back of the work.

But you do not need to do any of those in order to create a border in a different color except for having a few extra ends to weave in.

But is it hard?

It is not hard at all to work the border in a different color.  But you will need to work with 3 strands of yarn after finishing the bottom border.

Why do I need to work with 3 strands of yarn?

First let’s start our sample piece, then discuss why 3 strands are needed.

Bottom Border

 

For our sample today, I will be working the border in garter with the grey yarn.

 

 

 

 

Then I will be adding the pink for the body in stockinette or all knits while working both side borders with the grey in garter before finishing the top border with grey in garter.  This way the middle will be pink and completely surrounded by grey.

 

 

I will NOT be slipping the first stitch on each row.  If you would like to create a nice chain border, you can learn more about slipping stitches in Loom FAQs:  To Slip or Not To Slip?  That is the Frequently Asked Question.

Here I have started my bottom border with the grey yarn on the Sock Loom 2 over 22 pegs and worked 8 rows (4 ridges) in garter stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

Side Borders and Body

Now I will work the right border over 3 pegs.  Since I am working the border in garter, this row will be knit.

 

 

 

 

 

Join the yarn for the body which is pink for us here.   Leave the grey working yarn without cutting it.  We will pick it back up later.

How do I join the new color of yarn?

Some like to put the slip knot on the first peg of the new color.  I prefer to just start my new color as follows:

Simply work the first stitch in pink like normal leaving a tail to weave in later.  There really is not a need for a slip knot at all even on an anchor peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Won’t it leave a hole in that spot?

It will leave a hole if left alone, but you will close the hole when you weave in the end.  More information on weaving in ends can be found in Loom FAQs:  Why Not Knots?

For our sample, the body in the pink yarn will be 16 stitches.  I will be working every row of the pink yarn in all knits.  When the 16 stitches are complete, drop the pink yarn and join the second grey yarn.

 

 

 

 

 

Where do I get the second strand of grey?

If you are brave, you can pull 2 strands from one skein of yarn.  One side border from the middle of the skein and the other side border from the outside.

Otherwise you will need 2 skeins of grey or whatever color you are using for your border.

If making an afghan, you will be using more than one skein for the border anyway so I would recommend using 2 skeins from the start.

 

Join the second strand of border yarn in the same manner as before when starting the body color.

 

 

 

 

 

Knit the last 3 stitches.

 

 

 

 

Now for the return row.  This is where we will start connecting the border and body yarns together as we pick up the next color.

Since we are working the border in garter (still), purl the first 3 pegs on the return row with the grey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now we will connect the grey with the pink by twisting the 2 yarns around each other.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The easiest way is the bring the yarn you are picking up (the pink) around the back the yarn you are dropping (the grey)

 

 

 

 

 

so that they make a U, hooking them together.

 

 

 

 

 

Knit with the body color back across.  Which for us is 16 stitches to the other border.

 

 

 

 

We will now connect the pink with the grey from the other side in the same manner as before by bringing the yarn we are picking up (the grey) behind the yarn we are going to drop (the pink)

 

 

 

making that same U to connect them.  Then purl the last 3 pegs.

 

 

 

 

 

When twisting the 2 strands of yarn together, take care to make sure the twist does not slide to one side or the other.  Keep your tension with the twist even so the twist is right between the pegs.  Or you will get this at your join.  You can see here where I was not careful to keep my twist centered between the stitches.

 

 

Then we repeat our last 2 rows connecting the yarns as we going on EVERY ROW.

Next Row will be as follows:  Knit 3 with the first border yarn.  Pick up the body color yarn.  Twist the 2 strands together.  Drop the border yarn. Knit 16 with the body color. Pick up the 2nd border color yarn.  Twist the 2 strands together.  Drop the body yarn. Knit 3 with the 2nd border yarn.

Next Row after that will repeat the purl border row from above.

But how do I keep my yarn from twisting together?

If you always connect the strands of yarn in the same way each time, the yarn will not get tangled since each row will unwrap the twist in the yarn from the previous row.  This is why the yarn must always be wrapped by bringing the yarn you are ready to pick up and work with behind the yarn you just finished and are ready to drop.

How do I keep the loop where I started the new color from being too loose when I am working the next row?

When working the stitch on the same peg that you joined your new color, gently pull the tail to tighten up the stitch.  Do not pull it too tight though.  Just enough to close up the loose stitch when you go to weave in the end.

If I were to write it out like a “real” pattern, it will look like this after the bottom border.

Row 1:  K3, drop border color, pick up body color, K16, drop body color, pick up border color, K3

Row 2:  P3, drop border color, pick up body color, K16, drop body color, pick up border color, P3

Repeat rows 1 – 2 until the work reaches desired length.

The twisting of the yarn together will always happen but  not be written in the instructions.  Also the colors will most likely be abbreviated with the abbreviations at the beginning of the pattern.

After working my desired number of rows, I am now ready for my top border after finishing a row with purls for the border.

Top Border

When you are ready to work the top border, you can cut the body color yarn and left side border yarn leaving tails long enough to weave in without cutting the right border yarn since this is the yarn we will use to work the top border.  If you are working in the opposite direction from what I am demonstrating then just switch those sides.  Just do NOT cut the side that you just finished the last row with.

Also you will need to start the border with the row of knit if using garter stitch.

I have now worked the top border with 8 rows of garter stitch to match the bottom border.

Bind off in your desired method, weave in those very few ends, and admire your work!

 

 

Now you are armed and ready to amaze people with your ability to loom knit an afghan with a different color border from the body.  So get with it!  *cracking whip*  Amaze us!

 

 

 

 

But above all, have fun!  Enjoy your work and let the loom knitting bring you joy and peace.  Happy loom knitting!

2 Comments

  • Oh, i have been wondering how to do this forever! Thank you soooo very much! I am going to try it!

  • Thank you so much for this tutorial! I actually wanted to make something this way recently and had no idea how to do it.

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Mar 20, 2017

Bamboo Stitch (Double Knit)

Bamboo reminds us of tall erect stalks, and this version of the double knit rib looks very similar.  A very pretty design for most anything worked with even number of stitches.  The wide ribs are formed with 4 stitches in a series, but when opened, you will see lacy opening in center, between the 4 stitches.

bamboo stitch

Since this is a single pass of the loom, we will show illustration of 1st 10 stitches with row #1 and then, the 2nd illustration is row #2.

Bamboo stitch(2)

Row #1:     1          2           3             4              5             6             7             8              9           10

Bamboo stitch(2)

Row #2:     1             2             3           4            5             6              7                8            9             10

The minimum number of stitches to create this pattern would be 6 sts.  After that, add 4 more, so you can do it with 10 sts or 14 sts, 18 sts, or 22 sts, and on.  The reason for this is each row starts with either the 2 single wraps or the double wrap and it needs to end with same wrap.  You can see that the first 2 sts are back/to/back wraps.  The next 2 sts create a square or double wrap.  You keep alternating the 2 stitch series, and end with the series same as you began the row.  The next row or row #2, will start and end with the opposite series.

Look at the illustration and see the row #1 weave, the pegs 1 & 2 are single, pegs 3 & 4 are a double, pegs 5 & 6 are single, and 7 & 8 are a double, and 9 & 10 are single.

The row #2 will start with pegs 1 & 2 double, pegs 3 & 4 single, pegs 5 & 6 double, pegs 7 & 8 single, pegs 9 & 10 are double.  Once you do this a few rows, you will get comfortable with it and see your pretty design emerge.

How do you look at the completed row and know for sure which series you have just completed?  If you look at the illustration carefully, you will notice that with row 1, the yarn ends at peg #10.  That means that you just completed the 2 single pegs, so you want to start the next row with the double pegs.

If you look at row #2, you see that you end with the yarn coming from peg #9, so you just completed the double sts and will start the next row with 2 single sts.

Cast On in pattern(sample), or with stockinette, using row #1 as first row of pattern.  We will show only the first 10 sts.

Row #1:  Weave around peg #1 top, down to peg #1 bottom, up to peg #2 top, and down to peg #2 bottom.  Weave the next 4 pegs per the diagram.  Then next 2 consecutive, and continue across loom.

                                                                                

 

 

After the first row, lay the anchor yarn. Turn the loom around and work row #2. You are now starting with the 4 pegs, then 2 adjacent, then 4 pegs according to diagram.

You are ready to hook over.  Repeat row#1 and hook over.  Repeat row #2, and hook over.

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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3 Comments

  • This is a beautiful stitch. Thank you for the tutorial and the diagram really helps!

  • Thank you Cindy. It is fun to do once you get comfortable with the sequence. Pat

  • Thank you so much for sharing the double knit stitches. I prefer to use my boards for double knit, and all the stitchology techniques were beautiful but sadly “one sided”. Look forward to the Twisted Purl.

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Mar 16, 2017

Stitchology 30: Twisted Trellis Stitch

*Updated on March 20, 2017 , specifically Rows 4 & 12 of pattern when working multiple repeats.

The celebration of the Fair Isle has come again…March is the month of St Patrick’s Day!  What better way to put us in the true spirit of all things green and magical than to work a stitch that whorls and twists across the pegs?   If it looks rather complicated to manage, no worries, because it’s actually a fairly easy stitch to do!  The cables are done by simply twisting two peg’s stitches at a time as you work through the rows.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Special Stitch Instructions

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 8—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The cables in this pattern involve simply trading the loops of 2 pegs in the correct order. They consist of a Right Twist [rt2] (a twist with the sts running to the right), and a Left Twist [lt2] (a twist with the sts running to the left).  They are worked as follows:

[rt2]:  Worked over 2 pegs: Lift the loop from the peg on the right and either hold in your fingers, or place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the left and move it to the peg on the right.  Place the held loop onto the peg on the left.  With the working yarn, knit the 2 pegs.

[lt2]:  Worked over 2 pegs: Lift the loop from the peg on the left and either hold in your fingers, or place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the right and move it to the peg on the left.  Place the held loop onto the peg on the right.  With the working yarn, knit the 2 pegs.

*An easy way to remember which direction to go is to remember to hold the stitch on the side of the slant.  So…for a right twist, hold the loop on the right.  For a left twist, hold the loop on the left.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The squares in the chart that are highlighted with yellow are fluctuating stitches, depending on how many repeats of the 8 stitch pattern are being worked.  If there is only one set of 8 stitches, these highlighted squares are simply purled.  If, however, there is more than one repeat of the 8 stitches, then these squares become the twists, either right or left, that are noted in the chart and instructions below (see Rows 4 & 12).

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1:  p1, k2, p5

Row 2:  p5, LT2, p1

Row 3:  RT2, LT2, p4

Row 4:  ***When working Row 4 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, LT2, p3.

***When working Row 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, LT2, p2, *RT2, p2, LT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Row 5: p4, LT2, RT2

Row 6:  p1, LT2, p5

Row 7:   p5, k2, p1

Row 8:   Repeat Row 6

Row 9:   Repeat Row 7

Row 10: Repeat Row 6

Row 11:  p4, RT2, LT2

Row 12:  ***When working Row 12 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, RT2, p3.

***When working Row 12 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, RT2, p2, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Row 13:  LT2, RT2, p4

Row 14:  p5, LT2, p1

Row 15:  Repeat Row 1

Row 16:  Repeat Row 2

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Round 1:  p1, k2, p5

Round 2:  p1, LT2, p5

Round 3:  RT2, LT2, p4

Round 4:  ***When working Round 4 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, LT2, p3.

***When working Round 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, LT2, p2, *RT2, p2, LT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Round 5: p4, LT2, RT2

Round 6:  p5, LT2, p1

Round 7:   p5, k2, p1

Round 8:   Repeat Row 6

Round 9:   Repeat Row 7

Round 10: Repeat Row 6

Round 11:  p4, RT2, LT2

Round 12:  ***When working Round 12 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, RT2, p3.

***When working Round 12 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions:  p3, RT2, p2, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Round 13:  LT2, RT2, p4

Round 14:  p1, LT2, p5

Round 15:  Repeat Row 1

Round 16:  Repeat Row 2

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

7 Comments

  • This is a very cute stitch pattern and I like the new format. Thanks for taking the time to introduce us to differnt stitch patterns and the full instructions. Would the look of the backside be suitable for a scarf? Or better worked in the round as a tube scarf? I am currently working on the barber pole stitch pattern and I cant loom quick enough to try this one!

  • Hi CindyB! :) I’m so pleased you’ve been liking both the stitches and the new format.

    The back of this stitch is pretty cute! It almost looks like mermaid scales, or reversed honeycomb. It would make a nice scarf, in my opinion. :)

    Bethany~

  • I had a question on row 4
    ***When working Row 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, end p1

    As written, the stitch count is 12 stitches . So if i do two repeats of the stitch pattern, That would be 20 stitches? Rows 1-3 are multiples of 8 so how do i make up the difference of 4 stitches on rows 1-3? Sorry to ask…

  • Hi Cindy :) Please don’t ever be sorry for asking a question. I’m always happy to help! …and in this case, you actually helped *me*! :D

    Okay…this part is a little bit confusing, so let me see if I can help explain in another way. If you look at the chart for the repeating stitch pattern, you’ll see that in Row 4 the pattern sort of overlaps itself where it actually extends into two extra stitches on each side of the 8 pegs of the pattern. This row, with those stitches in place, actually begins with a right twist. Because the pattern won’t be beginning the row with a peg it doesn’t actually have, this right twist won’t happen yet. You will start the row with 3 purls, just this first time through the repeat. Then you’ll begin working the pattern repeat: LT2, p2, RT2, p2. Where I actually ended up adjusting the pattern was where to put that little ‘ol asterisk. It should be in front of the RT2 so that the repeating pattern will end with the LT2, p2. The corrections are now included in the pattern above.

    For your convenience, your instructions all written out for 2 repeats of the pattern would be:
    p3, LT2, p2, RT2, p2, LT2, p2, p1. = 16 pegs. :)

    Thanks for checking in so that we could get this nailed down!
    Bethany~

  • Thank you for the help Bethany. I am starting my scarf tonight.

  • I am trying to make the squares as we were doing previously on the loom
    I went to the Ravelry site and found the pattern with the squares that have symbols for the different stitches
    But the rows are different and Rt2 is sometimes LT2 due to the even and odd rows being different?
    If I follow your pattern and just add the border 2 rows will it come out ok?
    Also is there a way to copy the Ravelry chart enlarged?
    I’ve been trying for days to do this
    HELP. PLEASE
    Thanks

  • Hi Ginny :)

    The actual row numbers of the entire square pattern will differ a bit from the Repeating Stitch Pattern, because there have been added additional rows and stitches into the square’s design. Because of this, you won’t use the video to make the square as written. You can learn the stitches through the video, then use the chart’s instructions to work the square correctly. The instructions will generally be the same…it’s just the row numbers that will be different. Also, please see the notes below the video (as well as here in the pattern post), as there were a couple rows that were adjusted. ;)

    As for saving the chart from Ravelry, simply click on the chart so that it is featured in the pop-out style, right click on the photo and choose the “Save As” option to save to your computer.
    Hope that all helps get you going!
    Bethany~

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Feb 20, 2017

Loom FAQs: Is It Garter, Rib, or Seed Stitch?

 

 

 

 

 

The great thing about learning the purl stitch is that when combined with the knit stitch the possibilities seem to become limitless.  There are lots of stitch patterns that only include a combination of knit and purl stitches.

But the first ones learned include garter, rib, and seed stitches.  This is when the confusion comes into play.  All 3 include the instructions of 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  Beginners tend to get this confused.  Does K1, P1 mean rows or stitches?  What makes rib and seed different?  Why does my seed stitch not look correct?  Why does my rib stitch look weird?  You mean to tell me that isn’t the garter stitch?  But that is what I was told…  It goes on and on.

Let’s begin with our basic stitches again.  I won’t go into all the knit stitches since you can find all that information in Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch??.  It explains the different names and way of working the knit stitch on a knitting loom.  But I will recap the true knit stitch and the purl stitch here for convenience.

 

What is the difference between the true knit stitch and the purl stitch?

Working the true or traditional knit stitch is very similar to how a purl stitch is worked.  There really is only 1 difference.  The purl is basically a backward knit stitch so you are just working the knit stitch backward.

Now I know that statement was confusing so let’s see how each stitch is worked through the magic of photography.

Knit Stitch

In patterns when it says knit and doesn’t specify which method of knit stitch, it most likely means to use the true knit stitch.  The other methods except e-wrap are just for ease or tension purposes.  The reason that I do not include e-wrap in that statement is that e-wrap is a twisted knit stitch and will give the finished work a different look.

 

 

To work the knit stitch, bring the working yarn across the TOP of the loop on the peg.

Then bring the loom pick from the bottom, up through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn down through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

Purl Stitch

There is only 1 way to work the purl stitch.  And it is not spelled pearl.  Pearls are what is not suppose to be before swine.  Purls are for knitting.

 

To work the purl stitch, bring the working yarn across the BOTTOM of the loop on the peg.  This is where the confusion between the knit and purl stitch happens.

Then bring the loom pick from the top, down through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn up through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To recap, the knit stitch is from the top, and the purl is from the bottom.

 

Knit & Purl Stitch Patterns

Now on to the different stitches created by using both knit and purl stitches.  Since I will be writing out the instructions like they are written in patterns, you can refresh your memory on how to read a pattern in Loom FAQs:  How Do I Read A Pattern?

Also if you need a refresher on how to identify a knit stitch from a purl stitch, you can read how in Loom FAQs:  Is It A Knit Or Purl?

Abbreviations

K:  Knit

P:  Purl

 

Garter Stitch

Garter Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Row 1:  K all

Row 2:  P all

Repeat rows 1 – 2

 

What is a garter ridge?

Garter stitch is always written by rows.  2 rows equals 1 garter ridge.  Therefore if a pattern says to work a certain number of garter ridges, you will need to work twice that many rows since each ridge is equal to 2 rows.

 

Rib Stitch

1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a few variations of the rib stitch.  1×1 rib is what I will explain.  There is also a 2×2 rib and 3×3 rib stitches.

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

When working the rib stitch, each row must have the knits on the same pegs as the knit stitches and purls on the same pegs as the purl stitches in previous row/round for each row/round.  This makes the columns of knits and purls that creates the ribbing.

 

What if I am working in the round with an odd number peg count?

You will then need to add an extra knit or purl on that last peg before starting the new round.  I like adding an extra purl since it will not be noticed as much as an extra knit.  As you can see in the pictures above, the purls like to hide between the knit stitches.

 

Which version of the rib stitch is the stretchiest?

2×2 ribbing is the stretchiest of the rib stitches which makes it the best choice for cuffs on socks.

2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed Stitch

Seed Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to the nature of seed stitch, the stitch pattern is written differently depending on if it’s a flat panel or in the round and whether it is even or odd stitch count.

 

For even number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

 

For even number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to the end

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the end

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to the next to last peg, K1

Row 2:  *P1, K2, repeat from * to the next to the last peg, P1

Repeat rows 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to last peg, K1

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the last peg, P1

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

What makes seed stitch different from rib stitch?

While the rib stitch has the columns of knits and purls, seed stitch must have the knits on top of the purls of the previous row and purls on top of the knits of the previous row.  This is why the peg count makes the instructions different between even peg counts and odd peg counts.

 

What is the difference between seed stitch and moss stitch?

The seed stitch and the moss stitch are the exact same stitch.  Just depends on where you live what this stitch is called.

 

Do any of these stitches curl?

No.  When worked correctly, all 3 of these stitches will not curl making them all great options for hat brims and borders for flat panels.

Also the back of the these stitches are the same as the front.

 

I really do hope this helps explain the differences between these 3 stitches that all involve 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  It can be confusing at first.  But carry on!  Work a swatch with each one.  This will help get it in your brain better on how each one is different.

Then you will be ready for the plethora of other stitch patterns that only use knit and purl stitches.

Happy loom knitting!

 

5 Comments

  • When I first saw this stitch up close (above), it reminded me of the Eiffel Tower ;) I love it!

  • I just love the design of this poncho – but do not have a loom. Could this be adapted for hand knitting on needles and if so how as I’m not to adventurous and could not be able to transform it.
    Thank you in advance

  • I have recently purchased the shorty socks kit, utilizing the KB Sock Loom 2. The written instructions for the shorty socks, indicate as follows:

    Rd 1-8: *k2 p2; repeat from * to end of round

    Rd 9 and 10 *k2, p2, repeat from * to end.

    I understand the concept of the 2×2, My question is what is the difference between the two instructions. For some reason I’m missing it. In my mind if they were the same, the instruction would have been written as Rd 1-10. Please advise. Thank you

  • The stitch pattern for the leg portion starts at Rnd 9. It is the same as the previous round, but it is there to show that it is part of the leg portion, not the cuff.

  • I’m pretty much a beginner at loom knitting, even though I’ve been loom knitting for a few years, as I work, take care of my kid etc and don’t have a lot of time to knit. Recently I started making a cowl on an oval loom for my daughter. I believe I started out using the e wrap for one row, then the purl for the next row. I thought I was using the knit stitch but looked on YouTube, and saw the knit stitch as pretty much an upside down or backward (?) Purl. I had only done a few rows of e wrap so I changed to the other knit stitch. It looks pretty good. I didn’t realize there were so many ways to do a knit stitch. Am I knitting the garter stitch? Where can I buy your looms? Do you sell any books on loom knitting?

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