Browsing articles in "Stitches"
Jun 5, 2017

Stitchology 33: Encased Ribbing

This is a wonderful stitch that, like last month’s choice, creates an amazingly plush and reversible fabric.  Feel free to use this for pretty much any type of project, as it is beautiful when viewed on either side. Another terrific thing about this stitch is that it is absolutely perfect for summer knitting, as its only two pattern rows are so easy to remember and work on the go!

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

(SWYF) x2 directly translates to: Slip With Working Yarn in Front 2 times. This simply means that the next 2 pegs will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg. Repeat for the next peg in line.

*Note: another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

*Note: The stitches in the chart that are bordered with darker squares are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.

When working a Flat Panel, the stitches after the border square are worked only once: at the end of the first row, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed and at the beginning of the 2nd row, before the Repeating Pattern Rows are worked and repeated.

When working in the Round, only repeat the 4 stitches of the Repeat Pattern Rows within the border…the stitches after the border squares are not worked at all.  Make sure to simply read each row from right to left and work in a clockwise direction.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 4, plus 2 extra stitches at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1: *k2, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 2:  (SWYF) x2, *p2, (SWYF) x2, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rows 1 & 2 until desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 4):

Round 1: *k2, p2, rep from * to end.

Round 2: *(SWYF) x2, p2, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rounds 1 & 2 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

3 Comments

  • The notes on the entire square that is pictured above, are listed at the Ravelry project listing for this stitch here: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/encased-ribbing-stitchology-33 :)

  • I was wondering if there is a way to make adults hats on the adjustable sock loom sock loom?

  • Hi Dawn :)

    Sure, there is always a way to do what you want. The trick is figuring out the way to get it done, haha! ;) In this case, the whole idea hinges on the number of pegs available and the gauge of the loom itself. If you are talking about the Sock Loom 2: http://www.knittingboard.com/sock-loom-2/ , there are 54 pegs with a gauge of 3/8″ center to center of pegs, which works beautifully with worsted weight yarn. This may not be enough pegs to make an adult hat the traditional way, but you could always make them in panels, stitch them together and gather the top. You could also try to loosely ewrap the pegs for the main stitch, or use a very loose stitch pattern, such as the Figure 8 stitch…this would serve to make the overall circumference wider to help accommodate an adult sized head. Now if you were talking the All-n-One Loom, which has the same gauge a the Sock Loom 2, then there would absolutely be no trouble using any kind of stitch you desire to make an adult hat.

    The best way to determine if this will work for you on a loom with fewer pegs is to work a swatch of about 4″ by 4″ in your desired stitch and see how many pegs (& rows) it takes to equal that 4″. Take that total peg count and divide it by 4, which gives you your stitch count per inch. Then multiply this number by the inches needed for your hat and you will end up with the number of pegs needed to make that work.

    So: Make a 4″ x 4″ swatch. Total # of stitches ÷ 4 = stitches per inch. Stitches per inch x head circumference in inches = total number of pegs needed. :)

    Hope that helps!
    Bethany~

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May 1, 2017

Diagonal Cross Stitch: Stitchology 32

Our newest venture into loom knitting stitch discovery is this lovely design that creates an amazingly plush and reversible fabric.  Feel free to use this for pretty much any type of project, as it is beautiful when viewed on either side. While this technique will employ the use of a cable needle, it doesn’t actually have any cables. The tool will be used to slip one stitch over 3 others to create the slightly honeycomb feel of this design. Let’s get started!

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

 

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The yo-3 in this pattern involves slipping the yo loop over 3 stitches. This begins by creating a new loop which will be used as the yo loop.  In the charts, this is noted over the span of 3 sts/squares. In the instructions for the Repeating Pattern Rows, it is written like this: yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked.

To do this, follow the below instructions:

1. yo-3 peg: place the working yarn (wy) under the loop already on the peg as if to purl.  Pull the wy up through the loop to create a new loop. Place this new loop temporarily on the 2nd peg before the yo-3 peg.  (For example: work from right to left: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  Yo-3 peg in this example is on peg 3. Create new loop and bring new loop behind peg 2, and place temporarily on peg 1.)

2. yo-3 peg: U-stitch the yo-3 peg. (For our example: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  Yo-3 peg in this example is on peg 3. U-stitch peg.)

3. Purl next peg. (For our example:  6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  Purl peg 4.)

4. U-stitch next peg. (For our example: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.  U-stitch peg 5.)

5. Place 3 worked pegs (For our example: pegs 3-5) in order onto the left side of a cable needle.  Place new loop being held (For our example: on peg 1) onto far right side of cable needle.

6. Slip the new loop at the right over all three loops at the left, as well as entirely over the top of the cable needle.

7. Replace 3 held loops back onto pegs in order (For our example: pegs 3-5).

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

Repeating Pattern Rows- Flat Panel

Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches- Worked in the Round

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The stitches in both charts that are bordered with darker squares are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.  The stitches below the border squares are set-up rows to be worked only once, before the repeating rows. In the Flat Panel Chart, the stitches after the border square are worked only once at the end, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed. In the chart for working in the Round, there are stitches before and after the border squares that are worked only once: before all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Stitches, and after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Stitches, as are shown in each row of the chart.

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 4, plus 2 extra stitches at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rows

Row 1:  *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 2:  *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 3: *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to last 2 sts, k1, p1.

Row 4:  *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 5:   k1, p1, *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 6: *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rows 3-6 until desired length.

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 4):

Set-Up Rounds

Rounds 1 & 2: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rounds

Round 3: *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 4: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 5:  S1 with working yarn behind, p1, *yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked, p1, rep from * to last 2 sts.  The last stitch of round will carry over to the 1st peg of the same round (which was previously slipped): yo, k1, p1, k1, pass yo over 3 sts just worked.

Round 6: Begin on peg 2: p1, *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rounds 3-6 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

4 Comments

  • Would like to have the larger chart you briefly showed in the video that apparently was used in your sample…love the stitch and am anxious to try it…thanks.

  • Hi Marie :)

    Due to this new format and the extra time involved with creating the video, an entire pattern for the square will not be posted here. But currently, you can find the charts for the 8? x 8? squares since the new format began (Feb 2017: Lacy Hearts) and yarn information at the Ravelry page for each stitch. I hope this will help you to make gorgeous stitches with us! :) http://www.ravelry.com/designers/bethany-a-dailey

    Bethany~

  • Hi Bethany, I fell in love with this pattern and I am going to try it on a 90 peg loom repeating the pattern 44 times and the 2 extra pegs. I’m uncertain what cast on to use, but I want to try the cable cast on that matches needle cast on that I learned on good knit kisses you tube videos. Thank you for such a beautiful pattern.

  • Oh, wonderful, Jessie! :D I will look forward to seeing how your piece comes out! As for a cast on, the cable cast on I’m sure will work just dandy. My personal favorite is the chain cast on, which matches the basic bind off beautifully. :)

    Have fun with this!
    Bethany~

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Apr 15, 2017

Twisted Pearl Stitch (double knit)

Knitting in double knit with Rib stitches can create so many varieties, but each one is a new stitch to use in many applications.  Rib creates a very stretchy knit that retains its shape.

stitch_taupe

 

With the Twisted Pearl Stitch, the back of this stitch looks just the same so it is a good one for showing both sides.

Very pretty and similar to our traditional Rib, but you will find  that the ribs are tighter in this stitch, and the same on both sides.

The background weave shows an angle strand when the rib is opened. (See up close insert.)  Be sure to work with an even number of stitches.

 

twisted_purl_graph

 

 

 

 

 

0         1          2         3           4         5         6         7           8         9          10       11       12

Loom:  10” knitting loom or any loom with 22 + pegs with a width of 1 cm between rows of pegs.

Yarn:  Any #4 worsted weight yarn in wool, acrylic or blend. Sample square is knit with Lion Brand Heartland.

Abbreviations:  L=left, R=right

close up twisted

Close up detail of this stitch with color background.   

Instructions:

Cast On 22 stitches in pattern working L to R with at least (1) open peg to L of slip knot.

(Option would be to cast on with stockinette, lay anchor yarn, and wrap in pattern for row #1)

So, let’s see how it looks on the loom:  We are creating a square that is approximately 10″ X 10″ just to learn the new stitch.  When complete, makes a great wash cloth.

 

Step 1:  Start with a slip knot on peg 2 top.twisted_purl1

Step 2:  Wrap straight down around peg 2 bottom.

Step 3:  Bring yarn back to peg 1 and wrap around top peg from inside to outside and straight down around bottom peg #1.

Step 4:  Bring yarn from bottom peg 1 to top peg 4, wrap around top of peg and down to bottom peg 4 and wrap.

Step 5:  Go back to peg 3 top wrapping to L and down around the bottom peg.

Step 6:  You will see that the repeat is to skip a peg, wrap the next peg, top to bottom pegs straight down, and then go back to skipped peg and wrap the pegs around top, going straight down to bottom peg. Then repeat skipping the next stitch.

Step 7:  Work in this manner across the 22 pegs. Lay a piece of anchor yarn.

Turn the loom around, so that you are again working from L to R. This shows the return over the anchor yarn.

twisted_purl2

Move yarn to 2nd stitch and repeat the process starting with step 3.

Continue working this row for the design.

Stitches ready to hook over.

 

Row is complete

Row is complete.

 

 

 

 

 

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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Apr 3, 2017

Slip Stitch Braid: Stitchology 31

This lovely stitch is perfect for spring knitting.  It contains pretty braids that almost look woven in appearance.  This technique is created by using slipped stitches combined with 1 over 2 cables.  Don’t let those cables cause you any dismay, because they are super simple to work with the help of that elongated slipped stitch.  Repeated throughout a project, this stitch makes me think of baby knits, socks, or even a lovely hat (anything that the back isn’t going to necessarily be a feature).  Change the color every two rows and the look goes from delicate to Wow!

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

 

Special Stitch Instructions

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 5—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

**The stitch pattern does call for e-wrapping particular stitches. Wrap them, but do not knit them off until it is time to work these e-wraps into a row.  When it is time, knit off the stitch and then make sure to untwist the loop before working.

The cables in this pattern involve trading the loops of 3 pegs in the correct order. They consist of a 1 over 2 Right Cross [1/2RC] (a cable with the sts running to the right), and a 1 over 2 Left Cross [1/2LC] (a twist with the sts running to the left).  They are worked as follows:

[1/2RC]:  Worked over 3 pegs: Lift the 2 loops from the pegs on the right and place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the left and move it to the farthest peg on the right.  Place the 2 held loops onto the 2 pegs on the left.  With the working yarn, knit the 3 pegs.

[1/2LC]:  Worked over 3 pegs: Lift the 2 loops from the pegs on the left and place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the right and move it to the farthest peg on the left.  Place the 2 held loops onto the 2 pegs on the right.  With the working yarn, knit the 3 pegs.

*An easy way to remember which direction to go is to remember to hold the stitches onto a cable needle on the side of the directional slant.  So…for a right cable, hold the loops on the right.  For a left cable, hold the loops on the left.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

Slip Stitch Braid, Repeating Pattern

Slip Stitch Braid, Repeating Pattern with Color Stripes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The squares in the chart that are bordered with a pink square are the repeating pattern rows.  The squares outside the pink border are set-up rows to be worked only once, before the repeating rows. The chart on the right shows where to change colors, if an alternating color stitch is desired. 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rows

Row 1:  k all sts.

Row 2:  *EW1, k4, rep from * to end.

Row 3:  *k4, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 4: *S1, k2, EW1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 5: *k1, S1, 1/2RC, rep from * to end.

Row 6:  *EW1, k2, S1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 7:   *k1, 1/2LC, S1.

Repeat Rows 4-7 until desired length.

**Note:  When finishing the stitch pattern, omit the EW in the 2nd to last row and the S1 in the final row. 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Set-Up Rounds

Round 1:  k all sts.

Round 2:  *k4, EW1, rep from * to end.

Round 3: *k4, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeating Pattern Rounds

Round 4: *k1, Ew1, k2, S1, rep from * to end.

Round 5: *k1, S1, 1/2RC, rep from * to end.

Round 6: *k1, S1, k2, EW1, rep from * to end.

Round 7:   *k1, 1/2LC, S1, rep from * to end.

Repeat Rounds 4-7 until desired length.

**Note:  When finishing the stitch pattern, omit the EW in the 2nd to last round and the S1 in the final round. 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

  • Which cast on method would you use for this pattern?

  • Hi Margo :)

    You can use whichever cast on you prefer. My personal favorite and the one that I pretty much use every time is the Chain Cast On. I like this one because I feel it most closely matches the Basic Bind Off, which is my go-to bind off method. ;)
    Bethany~

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Mar 20, 2017

Bamboo Stitch (Double Knit)

Bamboo reminds us of tall erect stalks, and this version of the double knit rib looks very similar.  A very pretty design for most anything worked with even number of stitches.  The wide ribs are formed with 4 stitches in a series, but when opened, you will see lacy opening in center, between the 4 stitches.

bamboo stitch

Since this is a single pass of the loom, we will show illustration of 1st 10 stitches with row #1 and then, the 2nd illustration is row #2.

Bamboo stitch(2)

Row #1:     1          2           3             4              5             6             7             8              9           10

Bamboo stitch(2)

Row #2:     1             2             3           4            5             6              7                8            9             10

The minimum number of stitches to create this pattern would be 6 sts.  After that, add 4 more, so you can do it with 10 sts or 14 sts, 18 sts, or 22 sts, and on.  The reason for this is each row starts with either the 2 single wraps or the double wrap and it needs to end with same wrap.  You can see that the first 2 sts are back/to/back wraps.  The next 2 sts create a square or double wrap.  You keep alternating the 2 stitch series, and end with the series same as you began the row.  The next row or row #2, will start and end with the opposite series.

Look at the illustration and see the row #1 weave, the pegs 1 & 2 are single, pegs 3 & 4 are a double, pegs 5 & 6 are single, and 7 & 8 are a double, and 9 & 10 are single.

The row #2 will start with pegs 1 & 2 double, pegs 3 & 4 single, pegs 5 & 6 double, pegs 7 & 8 single, pegs 9 & 10 are double.  Once you do this a few rows, you will get comfortable with it and see your pretty design emerge.

How do you look at the completed row and know for sure which series you have just completed?  If you look at the illustration carefully, you will notice that with row 1, the yarn ends at peg #10.  That means that you just completed the 2 single pegs, so you want to start the next row with the double pegs.

If you look at row #2, you see that you end with the yarn coming from peg #9, so you just completed the double sts and will start the next row with 2 single sts.

Cast On in pattern(sample), or with stockinette, using row #1 as first row of pattern.  We will show only the first 10 sts.

Row #1:  Weave around peg #1 top, down to peg #1 bottom, up to peg #2 top, and down to peg #2 bottom.  Weave the next 4 pegs per the diagram.  Then next 2 consecutive, and continue across loom.

                                                                                

 

 

After the first row, lay the anchor yarn. Turn the loom around and work row #2. You are now starting with the 4 pegs, then 2 adjacent, then 4 pegs according to diagram.

You are ready to hook over.  Repeat row#1 and hook over.  Repeat row #2, and hook over.

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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3 Comments

  • This is a beautiful stitch. Thank you for the tutorial and the diagram really helps!

  • Thank you Cindy. It is fun to do once you get comfortable with the sequence. Pat

  • Thank you so much for sharing the double knit stitches. I prefer to use my boards for double knit, and all the stitchology techniques were beautiful but sadly “one sided”. Look forward to the Twisted Purl.

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Mar 16, 2017

Stitchology 30: Twisted Trellis Stitch

*Updated on March 20, 2017 , specifically Rows 4 & 12 of pattern when working multiple repeats.

The celebration of the Fair Isle has come again…March is the month of St Patrick’s Day!  What better way to put us in the true spirit of all things green and magical than to work a stitch that whorls and twists across the pegs?   If it looks rather complicated to manage, no worries, because it’s actually a fairly easy stitch to do!  The cables are done by simply twisting two peg’s stitches at a time as you work through the rows.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Special Stitch Instructions

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 8—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The cables in this pattern involve simply trading the loops of 2 pegs in the correct order. They consist of a Right Twist [rt2] (a twist with the sts running to the right), and a Left Twist [lt2] (a twist with the sts running to the left).  They are worked as follows:

[rt2]:  Worked over 2 pegs: Lift the loop from the peg on the right and either hold in your fingers, or place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the left and move it to the peg on the right.  Place the held loop onto the peg on the left.  With the working yarn, knit the 2 pegs.

[lt2]:  Worked over 2 pegs: Lift the loop from the peg on the left and either hold in your fingers, or place on a cable needle.  Lift the loop on the right and move it to the peg on the left.  Place the held loop onto the peg on the right.  With the working yarn, knit the 2 pegs.

*An easy way to remember which direction to go is to remember to hold the stitch on the side of the slant.  So…for a right twist, hold the loop on the right.  For a left twist, hold the loop on the left.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: The squares in the chart that are highlighted with yellow are fluctuating stitches, depending on how many repeats of the 8 stitch pattern are being worked.  If there is only one set of 8 stitches, these highlighted squares are simply purled.  If, however, there is more than one repeat of the 8 stitches, then these squares become the twists, either right or left, that are noted in the chart and instructions below (see Rows 4 & 12).

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1:  p1, k2, p5

Row 2:  p5, LT2, p1

Row 3:  RT2, LT2, p4

Row 4:  ***When working Row 4 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, LT2, p3.

***When working Row 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, LT2, p2, *RT2, p2, LT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Row 5: p4, LT2, RT2

Row 6:  p1, LT2, p5

Row 7:   p5, k2, p1

Row 8:   Repeat Row 6

Row 9:   Repeat Row 7

Row 10: Repeat Row 6

Row 11:  p4, RT2, LT2

Row 12:  ***When working Row 12 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, RT2, p3.

***When working Row 12 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, RT2, p2, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Row 13:  LT2, RT2, p4

Row 14:  p5, LT2, p1

Row 15:  Repeat Row 1

Row 16:  Repeat Row 2

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Round 1:  p1, k2, p5

Round 2:  p1, LT2, p5

Round 3:  RT2, LT2, p4

Round 4:  ***When working Round 4 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, LT2, p3.

***When working Round 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, LT2, p2, *RT2, p2, LT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Round 5: p4, LT2, RT2

Round 6:  p5, LT2, p1

Round 7:   p5, k2, p1

Round 8:   Repeat Row 6

Round 9:   Repeat Row 7

Round 10: Repeat Row 6

Round 11:  p4, RT2, LT2

Round 12:  ***When working Round 12 using only one repeat of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these instructions: p3, RT2, p3.

***When working Round 12 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions:  p3, RT2, p2, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, p1.

Round 13:  LT2, RT2, p4

Round 14:  p1, LT2, p5

Round 15:  Repeat Row 1

Round 16:  Repeat Row 2

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

7 Comments

  • This is a very cute stitch pattern and I like the new format. Thanks for taking the time to introduce us to differnt stitch patterns and the full instructions. Would the look of the backside be suitable for a scarf? Or better worked in the round as a tube scarf? I am currently working on the barber pole stitch pattern and I cant loom quick enough to try this one!

  • Hi CindyB! :) I’m so pleased you’ve been liking both the stitches and the new format.

    The back of this stitch is pretty cute! It almost looks like mermaid scales, or reversed honeycomb. It would make a nice scarf, in my opinion. :)

    Bethany~

  • I had a question on row 4
    ***When working Row 4 using multiple repeats of the 8 stitches of the pattern, follow these directions: p3, *LT2, p2, RT2, p2, repeat from * to last stitch, end p1

    As written, the stitch count is 12 stitches . So if i do two repeats of the stitch pattern, That would be 20 stitches? Rows 1-3 are multiples of 8 so how do i make up the difference of 4 stitches on rows 1-3? Sorry to ask…

  • Hi Cindy :) Please don’t ever be sorry for asking a question. I’m always happy to help! …and in this case, you actually helped *me*! :D

    Okay…this part is a little bit confusing, so let me see if I can help explain in another way. If you look at the chart for the repeating stitch pattern, you’ll see that in Row 4 the pattern sort of overlaps itself where it actually extends into two extra stitches on each side of the 8 pegs of the pattern. This row, with those stitches in place, actually begins with a right twist. Because the pattern won’t be beginning the row with a peg it doesn’t actually have, this right twist won’t happen yet. You will start the row with 3 purls, just this first time through the repeat. Then you’ll begin working the pattern repeat: LT2, p2, RT2, p2. Where I actually ended up adjusting the pattern was where to put that little ‘ol asterisk. It should be in front of the RT2 so that the repeating pattern will end with the LT2, p2. The corrections are now included in the pattern above.

    For your convenience, your instructions all written out for 2 repeats of the pattern would be:
    p3, LT2, p2, RT2, p2, LT2, p2, p1. = 16 pegs. :)

    Thanks for checking in so that we could get this nailed down!
    Bethany~

  • Thank you for the help Bethany. I am starting my scarf tonight.

  • I am trying to make the squares as we were doing previously on the loom
    I went to the Ravelry site and found the pattern with the squares that have symbols for the different stitches
    But the rows are different and Rt2 is sometimes LT2 due to the even and odd rows being different?
    If I follow your pattern and just add the border 2 rows will it come out ok?
    Also is there a way to copy the Ravelry chart enlarged?
    I’ve been trying for days to do this
    HELP. PLEASE
    Thanks

  • Hi Ginny :)

    The actual row numbers of the entire square pattern will differ a bit from the Repeating Stitch Pattern, because there have been added additional rows and stitches into the square’s design. Because of this, you won’t use the video to make the square as written. You can learn the stitches through the video, then use the chart’s instructions to work the square correctly. The instructions will generally be the same…it’s just the row numbers that will be different. Also, please see the notes below the video (as well as here in the pattern post), as there were a couple rows that were adjusted. ;)

    As for saving the chart from Ravelry, simply click on the chart so that it is featured in the pop-out style, right click on the photo and choose the “Save As” option to save to your computer.
    Hope that all helps get you going!
    Bethany~

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Feb 20, 2017

Loom FAQs: Is It Garter, Rib, or Seed Stitch?

 

 

 

 

 

The great thing about learning the purl stitch is that when combined with the knit stitch the possibilities seem to become limitless.  There are lots of stitch patterns that only include a combination of knit and purl stitches.

But the first ones learned include garter, rib, and seed stitches.  This is when the confusion comes into play.  All 3 include the instructions of 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  Beginners tend to get this confused.  Does K1, P1 mean rows or stitches?  What makes rib and seed different?  Why does my seed stitch not look correct?  Why does my rib stitch look weird?  You mean to tell me that isn’t the garter stitch?  But that is what I was told…  It goes on and on.

Let’s begin with our basic stitches again.  I won’t go into all the knit stitches since you can find all that information in Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch??.  It explains the different names and way of working the knit stitch on a knitting loom.  But I will recap the true knit stitch and the purl stitch here for convenience.

 

What is the difference between the true knit stitch and the purl stitch?

Working the true or traditional knit stitch is very similar to how a purl stitch is worked.  There really is only 1 difference.  The purl is basically a backward knit stitch so you are just working the knit stitch backward.

Now I know that statement was confusing so let’s see how each stitch is worked through the magic of photography.

Knit Stitch

In patterns when it says knit and doesn’t specify which method of knit stitch, it most likely means to use the true knit stitch.  The other methods except e-wrap are just for ease or tension purposes.  The reason that I do not include e-wrap in that statement is that e-wrap is a twisted knit stitch and will give the finished work a different look.

 

 

To work the knit stitch, bring the working yarn across the TOP of the loop on the peg.

Then bring the loom pick from the bottom, up through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn down through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

Purl Stitch

There is only 1 way to work the purl stitch.  And it is not spelled pearl.  Pearls are what is not suppose to be before swine.  Purls are for knitting.

 

To work the purl stitch, bring the working yarn across the BOTTOM of the loop on the peg.  This is where the confusion between the knit and purl stitch happens.

Then bring the loom pick from the top, down through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn up through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To recap, the knit stitch is from the top, and the purl is from the bottom.

 

Knit & Purl Stitch Patterns

Now on to the different stitches created by using both knit and purl stitches.  Since I will be writing out the instructions like they are written in patterns, you can refresh your memory on how to read a pattern in Loom FAQs:  How Do I Read A Pattern?

Also if you need a refresher on how to identify a knit stitch from a purl stitch, you can read how in Loom FAQs:  Is It A Knit Or Purl?

Abbreviations

K:  Knit

P:  Purl

 

Garter Stitch

Garter Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Row 1:  K all

Row 2:  P all

Repeat rows 1 – 2

 

What is a garter ridge?

Garter stitch is always written by rows.  2 rows equals 1 garter ridge.  Therefore if a pattern says to work a certain number of garter ridges, you will need to work twice that many rows since each ridge is equal to 2 rows.

 

Rib Stitch

1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a few variations of the rib stitch.  1×1 rib is what I will explain.  There is also a 2×2 rib and 3×3 rib stitches.

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

When working the rib stitch, each row must have the knits on the same pegs as the knit stitches and purls on the same pegs as the purl stitches in previous row/round for each row/round.  This makes the columns of knits and purls that creates the ribbing.

 

What if I am working in the round with an odd number peg count?

You will then need to add an extra knit or purl on that last peg before starting the new round.  I like adding an extra purl since it will not be noticed as much as an extra knit.  As you can see in the pictures above, the purls like to hide between the knit stitches.

 

Which version of the rib stitch is the stretchiest?

2×2 ribbing is the stretchiest of the rib stitches which makes it the best choice for cuffs on socks.

2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed Stitch

Seed Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to the nature of seed stitch, the stitch pattern is written differently depending on if it’s a flat panel or in the round and whether it is even or odd stitch count.

 

For even number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

 

For even number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to the end

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the end

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to the next to last peg, K1

Row 2:  *P1, K2, repeat from * to the next to the last peg, P1

Repeat rows 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to last peg, K1

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the last peg, P1

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

What makes seed stitch different from rib stitch?

While the rib stitch has the columns of knits and purls, seed stitch must have the knits on top of the purls of the previous row and purls on top of the knits of the previous row.  This is why the peg count makes the instructions different between even peg counts and odd peg counts.

 

What is the difference between seed stitch and moss stitch?

The seed stitch and the moss stitch are the exact same stitch.  Just depends on where you live what this stitch is called.

 

Do any of these stitches curl?

No.  When worked correctly, all 3 of these stitches will not curl making them all great options for hat brims and borders for flat panels.

Also the back of the these stitches are the same as the front.

 

I really do hope this helps explain the differences between these 3 stitches that all involve 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  It can be confusing at first.  But carry on!  Work a swatch with each one.  This will help get it in your brain better on how each one is different.

Then you will be ready for the plethora of other stitch patterns that only use knit and purl stitches.

Happy loom knitting!

 

5 Comments

  • When I first saw this stitch up close (above), it reminded me of the Eiffel Tower ;) I love it!

  • I just love the design of this poncho – but do not have a loom. Could this be adapted for hand knitting on needles and if so how as I’m not to adventurous and could not be able to transform it.
    Thank you in advance

  • I have recently purchased the shorty socks kit, utilizing the KB Sock Loom 2. The written instructions for the shorty socks, indicate as follows:

    Rd 1-8: *k2 p2; repeat from * to end of round

    Rd 9 and 10 *k2, p2, repeat from * to end.

    I understand the concept of the 2×2, My question is what is the difference between the two instructions. For some reason I’m missing it. In my mind if they were the same, the instruction would have been written as Rd 1-10. Please advise. Thank you

  • The stitch pattern for the leg portion starts at Rnd 9. It is the same as the previous round, but it is there to show that it is part of the leg portion, not the cuff.

  • I’m pretty much a beginner at loom knitting, even though I’ve been loom knitting for a few years, as I work, take care of my kid etc and don’t have a lot of time to knit. Recently I started making a cowl on an oval loom for my daughter. I believe I started out using the e wrap for one row, then the purl for the next row. I thought I was using the knit stitch but looked on YouTube, and saw the knit stitch as pretty much an upside down or backward (?) Purl. I had only done a few rows of e wrap so I changed to the other knit stitch. It looks pretty good. I didn’t realize there were so many ways to do a knit stitch. Am I knitting the garter stitch? Where can I buy your looms? Do you sell any books on loom knitting?

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Feb 20, 2017

Spiraling Rope Stitch (double knit)

This is a version of a favorite Rib Stitch in Double Knit. These wide ribs will make a great sweater, vest or blanket.  Even our beginners will enjoy a new twist to the knit/rib stitch.

stitch_purple

This Spiraling Rope Stitch reminds us of a wide rib, but it’s actually a shifting rib, front to back. It’s also great for a scarf or afghan that gets flipped over and over. Can’t tell the front from the back. It’s very stretchy and fun to work up.

Each rib is approximately 3/4″ wide and the inset is the center of the rib on opposite side, so it shifts after each set of double stitches.

 

spiral rope purple

0      1           2          3           4          5          6           7          8            9          10          1         12

Loom: 10” knitting loom, or any loom with 21+ pegs with a width of 1 cm between the rails.

In this stitch, you will work with any amount of stitches divisible by 3.

Yarn: Worsted weight #4 wool or blend. Our sample is worked with Lion Brand Heartland Worsted weight yarn.

Abbreviations:  L=left, R=right

Instructions:

Cast On 21 stitches (or as many as desired with multiple of 3).  Start on L end of loom on top peg 3.

Step 1: Place slipknot on peg 3 top.

Step 2: Come down to lower peg 3 and wrap counter-clockwise.

Step 3: Take yarn up to peg 6 top wrapping clockwise, and then down to lower peg 6 counter-clockwise.

Step 4: Skip 2 pegs and take yarn up to peg 9 top wrapping clockwise, and then down to lower peg 9 and wrap counter-clockwise.

Step 5: Continue across the loom till you have wrapped the last stitch of your pattern. In our sample, we are illustrating only the first 12 stitches.  Notice on the last wrap, the yarn goes around the outside of pegs.  Turn loom around.

Step 6-the return: Take yarn to first of 2 empty pegs, peg 10 top and down to lower peg 11. Continue up to top peg 11 wrapping in counter-clockwise direction. Continue down to lower peg 10, wrapping in clockwise direction.

Step 7: Work all empty pegs in same manner until you end at lower peg 1. Lay anchor yarn.

Repeat all steps 1 thru 7 in each row. Work until your square/project is as long as desired. Bind off at loom and anchor yarn once complete.

Note:  You may like to start with a Stockinette cast on, and one row of stockinette at end of work for easy bind offs.  This is done in sample.

Let’s look at the Spiraling Rope on the loom with each step:  After cast on, starting with the 3rd peg, wrap to end of stitches.  Return by wrapping last pegs straight across at end of loom.  Follow diagram and wrap all empty pegs as you return

Here you are completing the wrap.  And then last photo is a completed row, ready to hook over.  Just continue weaving this row until the knitted piece is as long as desired, or you feel that you have learned the Spiraling Rib stitch.

 

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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3 Comments

  • I especially like that bamboo stitch. Have you ever shown how to do that one before?

  • I love all of these. I hope we can learn the other two variations…tan and cream. Thank you for the how to instructions and the Diagram is an awesome addition.

  • I like the twisted purl and the bamboo?

    Do you have a video for it?

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Feb 14, 2017

Stitchology 29: Lacy Hearts

We will be changing the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Special Stitch Instructions

*All yarn overs (yo) are completed by laying the working yarn loosely across the front of the peg, not e-wrapping.

*For ease in reading the directions below, the steps  involving yarn overs and eyelets are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two or three pegs.

There are three ways of creating eyelets for this pattern: the Knit 2 Together (k2tog) for a right leaning eyelet worked as a knit, the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) for a left leaning eyelet worked as a knit, and a Knit 3 Together (k3tog), a decrease that creates an eyelet on either side.  The following dictates how to work these stitches as you will find them in the stitch pattern:

[k2tog, yo]:  Worked from right to left. Move the loop from yo peg to the k2tog peg. Knit the k2tog peg, working the two bottom loops as one. Loosely carry the WY across the front of the empty yo peg and continue to the next stitch as the pattern dictates.

[yo, ssk]: Worked from right to left. Move the loop from yo peg to the ssk peg. Loosely carry the WY across the front of the empty yo peg, then knit the next peg, working the two loops as one.

[yo, k3tog, yo]: (As seen in Row 7 of the pattern) Worked from right to left. Move the loops from the yo pegs to the k3tog peg.  Carry the WY loosely across the first empty yo peg, then work all 3 loops as 1 on the k3tog peg. Carry the WY loosely across the front of the next empty yo peg and work the next stitch as the pattern dictates.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working both as a flat panel and in the round  (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1:  *yo, ssk, k6, rep from *

Row 2 and all even rows to Row 16:  knit all

Row 3: *k1, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, rep from *

Row 5:  *k2, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, rep from *

Row 7:  *yo, k3tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, rep from *

Row 9:  *k4, yo, ssk, k2, rep from *

Row 11:  *k2, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k1, rep from *

Row 13:  *k1, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, rep from *

Row 15:  *k2, yo, ssk, yo, k3tog, yo, k1, rep from *

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

11 Comments

  • Please still include a picture of the knit square so have a reference instead of going to blog to view when knitting it. Thanks

  • Hi Bethany I love this column and am hooked on loom knitting but my previous comment regarding a picture Is just that I want to see the finished product just as you had previously. The video idea is absolutely fantastic and makes the stitches so easy to understand. Thanks so much for this column!

  • I want to continue with the 8 by 8 squares
    How many repeats should I do
    How many repeats across and what should I do for the ends
    Also how much wool
    What color and make and yardage of wool to make square
    This info was included on the other squares
    Also I would like it if you had the graphic of the entire square as before

    I love the video it is so clear
    Excellent but would appreciate the other info
    Thank you for any attention to this as I do want to continue the squares

  • Hi Maureen :)

    You are right…the photo of the square square should also be featured, and it has been added for your convenience. I’m so glad to hear you like the video!

    Bethany~

  • Hi Ginny :)

    I will let you in on a little secret: due to the extra time involved with creating the video, an entire pattern for the square will not be posted here, but the chart for an 8″ x 8″ square and yarn information is currently located at the Ravelry page for the stitch. I hope this will help you continue to make gorgeous stitches with us! :) http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lacy-hearts-stitchology-29

    Bethany~

  • I have just taken an interest in loom knitting, can you tell me what that casting on gadget is called so I can get one, and why in some patterns do you skip pegs? How do you decide which pegs to skip?

  • Hi Janice :)

    I’m not exactly sure what you mean by “casting on gadget”…do you mean the loom tool/hook that is used to work the stitches on the loom? I use a crochet hook to actually begin the project to add stitches to the loom. Either one of these tools can be found at your local craft stores, and the loom tool can be found at knittingboard.com.

    There are several reasons why you would skip a peg in a project. One is to create eyelets, which you see demonstrated here in this post. Another is to “slip” a stitch, which is simply to skip it. This is done 1) on the first peg of every row to create a nicely finished chain look on the edges of your knitted item, and 2) in the project itself to cause the loop from the row below to be pulled up and elongated a bit when it is knitted on the row following the row with the slipped stitch. Occasionally a stitch is slipped and the working yarn is actually carried to the front of the knitting instead of the back. This creates an interesting texture in your knitting, with a horizontal line across that slipped stitch in the finished piece.

  • Thank you that info was very helpful
    Also thanks for the terrific videos
    I love them all

  • I am having a problem with taking the yarn over
    I am using the u knit stitch
    It’s way too tight to move over
    Any hints how to make easier for that yarn over
    Is it the worsted wool or just my tension
    Help

  • Ginny…yep! It all comes down to tension how easy it is to move the stitches around. You’ll just want to loosen up your u-stitches by pulling the hook back a little bit extra when you knit off your loops. ;)

  • Lovely work, Sunshine!

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Jan 2, 2017

Stitchology 28: Large Herringbone

**Pattern updated Jan 9, 2017 (specifically Row 5).

The stitch we’ll be working up this month is wonderful for its simple symmetry and lines.  The bold repeating herringbone pattern makes this a wonderful stitch for deep texture and coziness! Worked in this winter white, it makes me think of snow clad forest branches. I can visualize this being used for hats, sweaters, scarves, socks, you name it!  This would also work beautifully as a companion to the smaller herringbone published in the very first Stitchology column as interesting play of texture in any project.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here and here.

Large Herringbone Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight Wool (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in mochi)  

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 16 sts—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
rep: repeat
CO: cast on
k:  knit
p: purl
wy: working yarn
BO: bind off

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 1:  [k2, p2] rep twice, k1, p2, k2, p2, k1.

Row 2:  p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1.

Row 3: k1, p1, k2, p5, p2, k2, p1.

Row 4: k2, p2, k2, p1, k1, p1. k2, p2, k3.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 37 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  p37.

Row 2:  k37.

Row 3:  p37.

Row 4:  k37.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: p2, [k2, p2] twice, k1, p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1, [p2, k2] twice, p2.

Row 6: k3, *p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1  rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 7: p2, *k1, p1, k2, p2, k5, p2, k2, p1, rep from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 8: *k5, p2, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2, p2,  rep from * to last 5 sts, k5.

Rows 9-56:  rep Rows 5-8.

Rows 57-59: rep Rows 5-7.

Finishing Rows

Row 60:  k37.

Row 61:  p37.

Row 62:  k37.

Row 63: p37.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

16 Comments

  • Looking at some of the past stitches in this series, I can see these knitting up as a wonderful sampler afghan. I am going to get started, so I can have a lovely afghan at the end of the year! This one looks great, and I can see myself making scarves, hats, shawls, and more out of it! Thank you!

  • Oh, that’s wonderful, Ruthie! Thank you so much for commenting and for taking part. I can’t wait to see your afghan! :D

  • Do you mean repeat twice or do the stitch pattern one more time? Just repeat?.Not repeat twice.
    I am confused

  • Hi, Ginny :)

    When you see sts placed inside brackets and then a number after…like twice…then it means to work those sts inside the brackets a total of 2 times. It might say after the brackets: 6 times, etc, but in this case it is only twice.

    Once those sts are worked the number of times listed, then you proceed to the next sts in the line of instructions for that row. Does that make better sense? :)

    Bethany~

  • Yes thanks

  • Row5 Main pattern row indicates 35 stitches
    On the break down after the k3 is there a P2 K2 (stitch row 21,22,23,24) then P2, K1.

  • Yes, you are correct, Ginny. :) The pattern has been corrected. Thank you…good eye!

  • Hi,when knitting flat,do I knit from right to left then left to right on the pattern,(row one right to left ,row two from left to right the third right to left and so on?thanks,jacki.

  • Hello Jacki :)

    The instructions say: Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs.

    The next row would be your beginning row, or Row 1, and would be knit in the opposite direction of the cast on…so right to left. And yes, you would alternate rows when working a flat panel…so for Row 2, you would turn and knit back across the row from left to right, and so on. :)

  • I used Red Heart yarn for this and it turned out 15 inches wide
    I have tried to block it
    To no avail
    How can I correct this.
    What did i do wrong
    I would try again but am afraid of the same poor result
    HELP
    PLEASE

  • Hi Ginny :)

    Well, first of all, in order to properly block something, you need to use yarns with a high natural fiber content. My own squares are knit with a wool or wool blend. Think of it like your own hair: you can get your hair to curl or straighten by using water or heat. This is the way blocking works for knitting. Acrylic just doesn’t have the same properties (it is essentially a plastic) to be able to re-mold itself into new shapes like natural hair/fiber. ;)

    But, even if you could block the square, 15″ probably couldn’t be blocked to 8″. Let’s look at some more ideas. .

    We need to look at what knit stitch you are using. I pretty much always use a U-stitch, which is in between the gauge of a regular knit stitch and a flat knit stitch. If you try to e-wrap, the stitches will come out way too loose.

    If you are using a U-stitch and are still getting a square that is too large, then either you need to knit with a snugger tension, or you will need to adjust the pattern to work with your own gauge. You can decrease the number of pattern repeat stitches that are in between the garter borders, based on the size you have ended up with, to equal something closer to the 8″.

    Also, another trick that I always do is to “snap” my stitches into place by pulling the knitting from top to bottom, vertically. When we work our stitches on the loom, they are at their most stretched out point. It helps to put them into their proper shape by giving them a gentle tug. ;)

  • Thank you
    I was wondering what is the loosest to the tightest knit stitch on the loom
    E wrap
    regular knit
    U wrap
    Flat knit

  • Yes, you have that correct. :) Here is a tutorial and comparison for you to refer to as well:
    http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/2543

  • Thanks a million

  • If I’m using 96 pegs, how do I continue the pattern after 37?

  • Hi Shirley :)

    Well, here is what the pattern says in the Notes:

    “For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.”

    So, in this case, you might not actually use the 37 count. This is just what I used for the square that includes border pegs and 2 repeats of the 16 stitch pattern. For 96 pegs, if you don’t have any border stitches, you could repeat the 16 pattern stitches 6 times. But if you want to fit in some border stitches, you could take out 1 or 2 of those 6 repeats to create a nice border on each side.

    If, on the other hand, you are wanting to use this stitch in the round, then you would simply work the 16 pattern stitches 6 times, and continue onto the following rows of the pattern, no border required.

    Does that make sense? :)
    Bethany~

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Dec 5, 2016

Stitchology 27: Little Pines

little-pines

Last December we learned a stitch using cables that formed a forest of Evergreens.  It seemed fitting to celebrate the entrance the holidays with another iconic wintry designthis time using eyelets to form majestic pine boughs. Even though this stitch is a 16 row repeat, once you get the hang of how the rows flow, they can be worked entirely from memory.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure. My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square. As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you? You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Little Pines Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in Clary)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes

It really helps to use a yarn with a high wool content for thoroughly blocking this square to help open up those eyelets and make the bottom edge straight.

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 18—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows. The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

*All yarn overs (yo) are completed by laying the working yarn loosely across the front of the peg, not e-wrapping! If you e-wrap, your eyelets will not be visible, unless you untwist the e-wrap before working into the next row. ;)

To work a S2KP (or: s2tog, k1, p2sso), please see the following instructions:

* Keep in mind that these steps are all accomplished on the same three pegs, worked from right to left: 3, 2, 1.

*  The instructions in brackets [ ] are simply to break the meaning of the abbreviations down to the simplest knitting terms, with the instructions on how to work them on the loom listed directly after. 

    • 1. [Slip 2 stitches together as if to knit 2 stitches together]: for this step, move the stitch on peg 1 to peg 2 and carry the yarn behind pegs 1 & 2 to peg 3.
    • 2. [Knit 1]: knit the stitch on peg 3.  *See Note Below.
    • 3. [Pass the 2 slipped stitches one at a time over the stitch just knitted and drop them]: for the this step, move the stitch on peg 3 to peg 2. Lift the 2 loops one at a time over the top loop.  **See Note Below.

*Note: Work Step 1 once the yo peg has been reached while working row.  After Step 1 is worked, move the same number of sts over to fill in the empty peg that equal the number of purls listed before the yo peg in the pattern/chart.   This puts the empty peg for the yo in the correct place for pattern.

**Note: After Step 3 is worked, move the same number of sts over to fill in the empty peg that equal the number of purls listed after the yo peg in the pattern/chart.   This puts the empty peg for the yo in the correct place for pattern.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

Row 1: *yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k9, rep from *.

Row 2 and all even Rows: knit all sts.

Row 3: *k1, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k10, rep from *.

Row 5: *k2, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k11, rep from *.

Row 7: *k3, yo, S2KP, yo, k12, rep from *.

Row 9: *k9, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, rep from *.

Row 11: *k10, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k1, rep from *.

Row 13: *k11 yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k2, rep from *.

Row 15: *k12, yo, S2KP, yo, k3, rep from *.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart. Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing! For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 37 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)  For ease of working the pattern, place a marker on pegs 10, 19, and 28.  These will be your S2KP pegs.

little-pines-frontSet Up Rows

Rows 1-6: Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Row a: p37

Row b:  k37

Main Pattern Rows

Row 7:  p4, k1, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k9, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k1, p4.

Row 8 & all even numbered Rows: k37

Row 9:  p4, k2, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k11, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k2, p4.

Row 11:  p4, k3, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k13, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k3, p4.

Row 13:  p4, k4, yo, S2KP, yo, k15 sts, yo, S2KP, yo, k4, p4.

Row 15:  p4, k10, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k10, p4.

Row 17:  p4, k11, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k11, p4.

Row 19:  p4, k12, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k12, p4.

Row 21:  p4, k13, yo, S2KP, yo, k13, p4.

Rows 23-61: repeat Rows 7-22.

Finishing Rows

Rows 62-67: Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Row a: k37

Row b:  p37

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.  This square was blocked quite thoroughly to really help the eyelets open and the stitches pop.  It was gently washed by hand, left to soak for a while, then the excess water was squeezed out by rolling and pressing the square inside a towel.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares. We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket. Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as
necessary:

• Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
• Children: 42″ x 48″
• Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
• Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
• Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

Save

4 Comments

  • I just wanted to say thank you for all the work you do with your stitchology monthly column. I haven’t had the time to make them all yet but I appreciate the work you put into them! This one is perfect for the holidays!

  • Oh, thank you so much, Christine! That means a lot! I’m so glad you have been enjoying them. :)

  • I wish you could state what pegs are what in the video. I am blind and when people do videos sometimes blind people watch. It is very hard to figure out what peg you are talking about when you say this peg and point to it.
    I love this stitch and wish II could make it.
    thank You. Judy

  • Hi Judy :)

    This is very interesting and I will try to keep this in mind for the next time I do a video. Since the video is meant to simply be an aid to the written pattern, I hope that if you follow the words written, the technique will make more sense to you. If you have any questions at all in how to work the stitch, please feel free to ask right here! :)

    Bethany~

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Nov 7, 2016

Stitchology 26: Mesh Stitch

This lacy stitch is super simple to create and yet still makes a beautiful statement.  There are only 4 rows to repeat in this one, making it a perfect pattern to create from memory…excellent for the beginning of the busy holiday season November brings.  The pattern in this one reminds me of a pretty woven bread basket my mom used to use at her Thanksgiving table every year. This stitch looks lovely from the back side as well, making it a terrific one for projects that may be seen from both sides, such as scarves, shawls and blankets.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Mesh Stitch Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (sample uses Lion Wool in Pumpkin)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 3,+2 added stitches at the end—this is the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat, plus the last stitches of the round will be just the first 2 of the 3 repeat stitches due to the nature of this stitch pattern.  The vertical purl lines will be one stitch closer together at this spot, so it is best placed at the back, or in a fairly inconspicuous spot on your project.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

This stitch pattern can be made into a very uniform and more open lacy design by stretching it taut while pinning during the blocking step.  Make sure it has had a sufficient soaking time to help accommodate this look.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

*All yarn overs (yo) for this stitch are completed by e-wrapping the peg.  The e-wraps are then untwisted when working them during the next row to emphasize the eyelet holes.

There are two ways of creating eyelets for this pattern: the Knit 2 Together (k2tog) for a right leaning eyelet worked as a knit, and the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) for a left leaning eyelet worked as a knit. The following dictates how to work these stitches as you will find them in the stitch pattern:

*For ease in reading the pattern’s directions below, the steps  involving eyelets are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two pegs.

[k2tog, yo]:  Work over 2 pegs from right to left <: Move the loop from peg 2 (the yo peg) to peg 1 (the k2tog peg). Using the working yarn, knit the bottom 2 loops as one on the k2tog peg, then e-wrap the empty yo peg.

[yo, ssk]: Work over 2 pegs from right to left <: Move the loop from peg 1 (the yo peg) to peg 2 (the ssk peg). Using the working yarn, e-wrap the empty yo peg, then knit the bottom 2 loops as one on the ssk peg.

All the e-wraps are then untwisted when working them during the next row to emphasize the eyelet holes.

Repeating Pattern Rows

The Repeating Pattern Rows for this stitch are fairly tricky to explain, as they are repeating 2 rows of a 2 stitch repeat and 2 rows of a 3 stitch repeat.  They can be represented here in only a repeat of 3 stitches, but they are shown to 9 stitches so that the idea of how they travel down the row can be seen in its entirety.

So, in order to repeat this pattern when working in the round, simply keep repeating these stitches for the number of rows needed, with all rows beginning from the right side.  Please see the Pattern Notes for more instructions on this.

For repeating this stitch pattern when working as a flat panel, end at a number divisible by 3, within the chosen border.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

eyelets-angle

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 36 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p36.

Row 2: k36.

Row 3: p36.

Row 4: k36.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: p2, *p1, k2tog, yo, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 6:  *k2, p1, k2, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p1, k2.

Row 7:  p2, *p1, yo, ssk, repeat from * to  last 3 sts, p3.

Row 8:  Repeat Row 6.

Rows 9-58:  Repeat Rows 5-8.

Finishing Rows

Row 59: p36.

Row 60: k36.

Row 61: p36.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

2 Comments

  • Would it be possible for you to make a video of the steps for things like the yarn overs, ssk, etc. techniques for patterns like this. I’m a super audio/visual learner and can’t seem to get those steps right from just written directions.

  • Hi Deb :)

    Well, let’s walk through this to help you out…

    First of all, a yarn over in this case is simply an ewrap. This ewrap will be untwisted when you’re ready to knit it into the next row…you don’t *have* to take the twist out, but it helps open up those eyelets better. ;)

    I generally don’t make videos for techniques that can be found elsewhere, but when it’s a new thing for the Stitchology column, or loom knitting in general, then I like to do a video.

    The following is a technique video I did for all three of the techniques involved in the Mesh Stitch: K2tog, ssk, and an ewrap YO. It is for the stitch Spring Bunnies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbeANK7hcU8

    This will get you all caught up on the actual techniques, then you just plug those skill into whatever pattern you desire. :D

    If you have any additional questions, please don’t hesitate to drop a comment!
    Bethany~

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Oct 3, 2016

Stitchology 25: 4-Stranded Basketweave

This is a truly lovely and eye catching design for you to create on your looms!  I love the accentuated woven look it provides.  My hubby is one who doesn’t usually pay particular attention to the subtleties of my various knitting stitches, but when I showed him this one, he was immediately pleased with the look and said, “Now that’s an interesting stitch!”  :)  Even though this stitch is a 16 row repeat, once you get the hang of how the rows flow, they can be worked entirely from memory.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure. My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square. As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you? You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

4-Stranded Basketweave Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge. The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage mellow) *Note: It really helps to use a yarn with a very high wool content for thoroughly blocking this square to help straighten those long strands.

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors. (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

It really helps to use a yarn with a very high wool content for thoroughly blocking this square to help straighten those long strands.

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 6—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows. The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

A SWYF in the pattern denotes that this peg will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg.  This stitch pattern will do this in groups of four stitches at a time.

*SWYF Notes:  Because this stitch requires slipping 4 pegs at a time, make sure to pull slipped strands taut when knitting the next stitch after the slipped stitches.  This will keep the strands from sagging after the square is complete and blocked.

Another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:
Rows 1 & all odd numbered rows: k6.
Rows 2, 4, 6, & 8: SWYF-2, k2, SWYF-2.
Rows 10, 12, 14, & 16: k1, SWYF-4, k1.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart. Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing! For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p38.
Row 2: k38.
Row 3: p38.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 4 (and all even rows): k38.
Rows 5, 7, 9, & 11: p3, k1, SWYF-2, k2, *SWYF-4, k2, repeat from * to last 6 sts, SWYF-2, k1, p3.
Rows 13, 15, 17, & 19: p3, k2, *SWYF-4, k2, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p3.
Rows 20-76: repeat Rows 4-19.

Finishing Rows

Row 77: p38.
Row 78: k38.
Row 79: p38.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off) Weave in ends and trim close to work.
Block well to an 8” x 8” measurement.  It helps to squish the square in hot water for a bit, then soak thoroughly.  This will help tighten those long strands.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares. We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket. Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as
necessary:

• Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
• Children: 42″ x 48″
• Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
• Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
• Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

8 Comments

  • Is there a video showing the SWYF
    I understand better that way
    I am new to looming
    Thanks

  • Hi Ginny :) Welcome to the wonderful world of Loom Knitting! I know you’ll get years of enjoyment from this craft.

    In answer to your question, if you go to this link for the Bunnies on Parade Stitch, Stitchology 21, you’ll find a tutorial video included.
    http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/5625

    In this video, the first technique shown is the one for a s2wyif, which is really the same as a SWYF-2. Just follow the first steps, without wrapping the working yarn back behind the pegs a second time to p2. This is for the bunny stitch only. ;) For the Stranded Basketweave, you would actually continue with 2 more SWYF so that you you have a total of 4 slipped stitches. Then on the following knit stitch, pull that trailing strand very taut, so that it won’t want to sag.

    This should get you going…it’s really super simple to do! :) Please feel free to let me know if I can be of any additional help.
    Bethany~

  • Hi,
    is there a way to make this pattern come out more like the needle version? I have noticed that patterns with slip stitches create very large floats when loomed, whereas the floats in the needle version look a lot shorter.

    Thanks!

  • I think the “long floats” created by swyf on a loom is supposed to look this way.

  • Well, these are pretty long floats to begin with…you are slipping 4 pegs to make them. To make them be snugger, you need to pull the line taut before knitting the next stitch after the float. This helps keep those long lines from sagging too much. Even after doing this, you will still notice a little sag until the square is blocked. This is why this particular stitch is highly recommended to be worked in a wool or high wool content blend, to aid in the blocking process. After this, they should lie flat. :)

    If you still don’t like the look of the long strands, you could work the same idea with only slipping 3 pegs. This will keep them shorter, with less chance of them being too loose. Of course, the pattern will have to reworked to account for the adjusted peg number in use.

  • Bethany, I have actually noticed the same thing as Sara. Your pattern “Triple Rib Square”(http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/4881) looks quite different than if it was knitted on needles(http://www.knitca.com/slipstitch14). I think it must just be due to the pegs stretching the stitches so much.

  • You are correct, Brynn. The simple nature of loom knitting has the stitches being worked at their most stretched out position. This makes the slipped stitches stretch across the already stretched out stitches. When you are doing the same thing on needles, the slipped stitches are simply carried around the yarn of the previous row’s stitches, which as you can imagine, produces a tighter float. There’s not much to be done to make them look any similar…this is just one of those things where the differences show when forming the stitches on pegs in a line, rather than on two sticks. ;)

  • Thank you Bethany for the explanation :)

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Sep 5, 2016

Stitchology 24: Barber Pole

Barber Pole Front Angle

The stitch we’ll be working up this month is wonderful for its simple symmetry and lines.  The bold repeating pattern makes this a shoe-in stitch for those guys in your life! I can visualize this being used for hats, sweaters, scarves, socks, you name it!

Back side of Barber Pole Stitch~

Back side of Barber Pole Stitch~

The back of this stitch looks completely different, but very pleasingmaking this ideal for possible reversible projects or ones that might be viewed from both sides.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Barber Pole Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight Wool (Sample uses Patons Classic Wool Worsted in Jade Heather)  *Wool is recommended for this square, as blocking is a must.

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 8 sts—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
rep: repeat
CO: cast on
k:  knit
p: purl
wy: working yarn
BO: bind off

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 1:  p1, k6, p1.

Row 2:  p1, k5, p2.

Row 3: p3, k4, p1.

Row 4: p1, k3, p2, k1, p1..

Row 5: p1, k2, p2, k2, p1.

Row 6: p1, k1, p2, k3, p1..

Row 7: p1, k4, p3.

Row 8: p2, k5, p1.

Row 9 & 10: p1, k6, p1.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

 

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  p38.

Row 2:  k38.

Row 3:  p38.

Row 4:  k38.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: p4, *k6, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 6: k3, p1, *k5, p3,  rep from * to last 5 sts, p2, k3.

Row 7: p6, *k4, p4, rep from * to end of row.

Row 8: k3, p1, *k3, p2, k1, p2,  rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Row 9: p4, *k2, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 10: k3, p1, *k1, p2, k3, p2,  rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Row 11: p4, *k4, p4, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 12: k3, p2, *k5, p3, rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Row 13: p4, *k6, p2, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 14: k3, p1, *k6, p2,  rep from * to last 4 sts, p1, k3.

Rows 15-54:  rep Rows 5-14.

Rows 55-57: rep Rows 5-7.

Finishing Rows

Row 58:  k38.

Row 59:  p38.

Row 60:  k38.

Row 61: p38.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

4 Comments

  • Thank you I was waiting for the next pattern

  • Oh, glad to help keep your loomy juices flowing, Ginny! :) Some of us took a little vacay time in August, but are back now, so you’ll see more designs coming off the looms soon! :D

  • Love this easy pattern. Would the wrong side look nice enough for a mans scarf? Keep the patterns coming. Than you!

  • Hi Cindy! :) I’m so glad you like it! I think the back side is really neat looking and would be very suitable for a men’s scarf. Of course, everyone has their own preferences, but I, myself, would definitely use it for that purpose! ;)

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Jul 4, 2016

Stitchology 23 : Lattice with Seed Stitch

Summertime is here and that calls for a stitch that won’t take too much time away from those busy summer schedules to master.  It’s another one of those stitches that consists of only knits and purls—perfect for a quick knit with loads of texture and possible future uses.  This one is truly lovely and reminiscent of the woven crusts on the top of  a scrumptious cherry pie!

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Lattice and Seed Stitch Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in berries)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

This versatile stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to a variety of projects, especially ones that the back side isn’t featured, as the design is best displayed from the front.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 14 + 2 sts added at the end—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat + the number of ending sts to complete the pattern.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
rep: repeat
CO: cast on
k:  knit
p: purl
wy: working yarn
BO: bind off

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

The blue columns in the above chart represents the added 2 stitches needed to be tacked at the end of the repeating rows to complete the pattern.  This is why the stitch pattern is listed as a repeat of 14+2 stitches.  Stitches 1-14 are repeated as desired, then stitches 15 & 16 are added at the end to complete the pattern.  These last 2 stitches will be implemented below as if there is only one pattern,  with no repeats.

Row 1:  k16.

Rows 2, 4, 6: k2, *(p1, k1) 3 times, k1, rep from * .

Rows 3, 5, 7: k3, *(p1, k1) twice, k3,  rep form * to last 2 sts, k2.

Rows 8 & 10: p14, k2.

Rows 9 & 11: k16.

Rows 12, 14, 16:  rep Rows 2, 4, 6

Rows 13, 15, 17: rep Rows 3, 5, 7

Rows 18 & 20:  *k2, p5, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 19: k16.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 41 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  p41.

Row 2:  k41.

Row 3:  p41.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 4:  k41.

Rows 5, 7, 9: p2, k2, *(p1, k1) 3 times, k1, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Rows 6, 8, 10: k5, *(p1, k1) twice, k3,  rep from * to last st, k1.

Rows 11 & 13: p2, k2, *p12, k2, rep from * to last 9 sts, p9.

Rows 12 & 14: k41.

Rows 15, 17, 19:  rep Rows 5, 7, 9.

Rows 16, 18, 20: rep Rows 6, 8, 10.

Rows 21 & 23:  p9, *k2, p12, rep from * to last 4 sts, k2, p2.

Row 22: k41.

Rows 23-70: rep Rows 4-22.

Finishing Rows

Row 71: p41.

Row 72:  k41.

Row 73:  p41.

Row 74:  k41.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

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Jun 6, 2016

Stitchology 22 : Mermaid Scales

 

The best part about this month’s new stitch pattern is that it is so very easy to accomplish, with only four rows to repeat and a technique that is worked over just 2 pegs…nice!  The most difficult part for me this time around was trying to decide what it most reminded me of to be able to choose a name, lol!  When I look at this square, I see a pretty lattice design that is anchored with knots on each side, but I also see four-pointed little flowers, sea stars, and even water droplets.  The more I got to looking at it, the more it seemed to be quite intricate and even a little mesmerizing. The knitting chart even turned out to resemble a sea full of rolling waves!  Mermaids seemed the perfect idea to convey a little bit of mystery, along with all things sparkling sea and sand for the beginning of summer. I hope you think so too…Enjoy!

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)  To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Mermaid Scales Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage neptune)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

 

Pattern Notes:

*For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

*When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.  When the stitch requires an e-wrap, it will be noted.

*All slip stitches (s1) for this pattern are completed by carrying the working yarn behind the peg(s).
Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
CO: cast on
ew E-wrap stitch
s1: slip/skip one peg
k: knit
KO: knit off
wy: working yarn
ssk: slip, slip, knit
m1: make one/increase by one
BO: bind off

__________________________________________________________________

*For ease in reading the pattern’s directions below, the steps  involving the pattern’s lacy stitch are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two pegs.

This pattern creates eyelets by the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) method, for a left leaning eyelet. The following dictates how to work them, along with the lace method, into the pattern:

[s1, ssk, m1, ew]:  Work over just 2 pegs (from right to left):

  • Move the loop from the s1 peg to the ssk peg.
  • Carry the wy behind the empty s1 peg to the ssk peg.
  • Knit off the first loop on the ssk peg and rather than letting the loop drop behind the peg, slide it back over the s1 peg for a “make one”(m1).
  • Knit off the 2nd loop on the ssk peg.
  • E-wrap the s1 peg and knit off.
  • Move to the next 2 pegs in line and prepare to ssk.  The wy will be carried behind both the original ssk peg and the newly empty s1 peg of the next 2 pegs in line.

____________________________________________________________________

*Please view this handy video for an easy to visualize tutorial on how to work the [s1, ssk, m1, ew] on only 2 pegs:  (*Clarification Note: the video describes the eyelet decrease as a knit 2 together (k2tog), but because it is a left leaning decrease, it is actually an ssk. ;) )

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

(*Note: The knits in Rows 2 and 4 are only added at the beginning and end of each of the rows to make them offset from one another. The repeating stitch count is actually in multiples of 2 + 1 for knitting in a flat panel. Check out the chart below of the entire square to see this in action.)

Row 1: k3.

Row 2: *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], rep from *,  k1.

Row 3: k3.

Row 4: k1, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], rep from *.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 30 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p30.

Row 2: k30.

Row 3: p30.

Main Pattern Rows

Mermaid Scales Stitch angleRow 4:  k30.

Row 5:  p3, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], repeat from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 6:  k30.

Row 7:  p3, k1, *[s1, ssk, m1, ew], repeat from * to last 4 sts, k1, p3.

Rows 8-53:  Repeat Rows 4-7.

Row 54: k30.

Finishing Rows

Row 55: k30.

Row 56: p30.

Row 57: k30.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.  This particular square is worked a tad smaller than 8″ x 8″, so that once blocked, the pattern will open up to show the eyelets at their best.  A thorough soaking and pinning to the 8″ x 8″ measurement is required to achieve the proper size.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

6 Comments

  • I love the mermaid scale stitch. I have been searching for the “how to ” for this stitch. I am looking for a loom knitting pattern for the full mermaid tail for an adult and have had no luck finding one. Would you happen to have a pattern for the mermaid tail?

  • Hi Nancy! :) I’m so glad you like the stitch…I love the visual depths it produces, with so little effort! All the how-to information on this particular stitch is included in this post. ;)

    I will say that there is a terrific mermaid tail blanket for the looms released here:
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/loom-knit-mermaid-tail-blanket

    It uses the crocodile stitch, but you could substitute this Mermaid Scale stitch in place of it for a much simpler choice. I would love to see it when you have finished!

    Bethany~

  • This looks stunning. I’d like to make a scarf with this stitch. Would leaving off the garter edge on the sides make it curl? Thanks for the helpful video. I always look forward to your posts Bethany.

  • Oh, wonderful, Cindy! I’m so happy to hear this stitch (and the others) are well received…thank you!

    As for leaving off the garter borders, I think you will be ok. I didn’t notice any significant curling with this one, and it does require a bit of blocking to open up the stitch, which would also stop the curling. Just remember to use a wool, or another natural fiber that blocks well. :)

    Happy looming!
    Bethany~

  • Bethany, I love this stitch. My daughter in law wants a baby mermaid blanket as a photo prop. I believe this stitch will be perfect.
    Thank you for sharing.

  • Oh, I’m so glad you will find it useful, Carol! :) I can’t wait to see your finished mermaid blanket!

    Bethany~

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May 2, 2016

Stitchology 21 : Bunnies on Parade

Spring has sprung and apparently I can’t think about anything other than sweet little bunny rabbits while knitting!  I simply meant to do an interesting new technique for May’s Stitchology, and guess what?  It came out with bunnies prancing across the square in neat and orderly rows. I’m definitely not one to deny my love for those furry creatures, so bunny rabbits it is! :)  The neat thing about this stitch is that the backside is really pretty too, and looks like an entirely different stitch altogether.  Because of this, Bunnies on Parade would be a terrific stitch for making items that can be reversible such as blankets, hats, scarves…you name it!

It’s Reversible!

Back Side of Stitch

Back Side of Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Bunnies on Parade Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in banane)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

 

Pattern Notes:

This versatile stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to pretty much any type of project.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 2—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The abbreviation “rep” stands for “repeat”.

The abbreviation “wy” stands for “working yarn”.

 

*There are two types of Slip Stitches in this stitch pattern.  They are worked in the following ways:

s1: Slip one stitch with working yarn in back (worked over one peg) 

How to do it: *Simply carry the working yarn behind the peg, without working the loop on the peg.

s2wyif/p2:  Slip two stitches with working yarn in front, then purl the same two stitches (worked over 2 pegs, from right to left)

How to do it

*Lift the loop from peg #1 and carry the working yarn in the space in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace held loop. Repeat for peg #2.

*Bring the working yarn around to the back of peg #2, and carry behind both pegs #2 and #1, finally bringing around to the front of peg #1 again.

*Purl pegs #1 and #2.

**Note: See the tutorial video at the bottom of this post for a more visual instruction tool. 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Stitchology 21- Square

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

 

Step by Step Instructions:

Bunnies on Parade-close back

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 40 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  P40

Row 2:  K40

Row 3:  P40

Row 4:  K40

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: P3, *s2wyif/p2, rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 6: K3, *p1, s1, rep from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 7: P3, *s1, p1, rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 8: K40

Rows 9-68:  Rep Rows 5-8.

Finishing Rows

Row 69: P40

Row 70:  K40

Row 71:  P40

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

 

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

2 Comments

  • I’m wanting to make a shaw with finger lace weight yarn using the “star stitch.” I have only found 1 video on you tube but it’s using a “bulky” yarn. But I’m afraid that my loom’s & that the yarn is to fine for my project. Do you think my project “can” be completed on a loom? I’m afraid that because my yarn is to fine it may not work!
    Thank you for your time.
    CH

  • Hi Cindy :)

    I think it would be possible, but you will need to match your yarn with the properly gauged loom. A fine gauge, or extra fine gauge loom might be the best for you. You can always try a small section of the pattern as a swatch to see how it will come out…only way to know for sure if you like the results. ;)

    Best of luck to you!

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Apr 4, 2016

Stitchology 20 : Spring Bunnies Stitch

Spring Bunnies Square

I’ve been pleased as punch with the way this month’s stitch turned out…so sweet!  There’s something special about the pairing of bunnies and spring, and this new stitch exemplifies them both quite nicely. :)  Wouldn’t this be a fantastic  stitch for a little girl’s jumper, or a baby layette? There is a bit of an unusual method for working the bunny ears, but it really is very simple to do.  I have included a tutorial video for this one, since the technique may be new to you.  Let’s dive in and learn this pretty design while whipping up an afghan square…

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)  To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Spring Bunnies Square

 

Spring Bunnies close up

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage sakura)

Notions: Loom tool, crochet hook, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 8—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

*All yarn overs (yo) for this stitch are completed by e-wrapping the peg.

*For ease in reading the pattern’s directions below, the steps  involving eyelets are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two pegs.

There are two types of decreases for creating the eyelets in this pattern: the Knit 2 Together (k2tog) for a right leaning decrease worked as a knit, and the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) for a left leaning decrease worked as a knit. The following dictates how to work these stitches as you will find them in the stitch pattern:

[k2tog, yo]:  Work over 2 pegs: Move the loop from the yo peg to the k2tog peg. Using the working yarn, u-stitch knit the k2tog peg, knitting off the 2 loops as one, and then e-wrap the empty yo peg.

[yo, ssk]: Work over 2 pegs: Move the loop from the yo peg to the ssk peg. Using the working yarn, e-wrap empty yo peg, then u-stitch knit the ssk peg, knitting off the bottom 2 loops as one.

Making the Bunny Ears:

Where you see the symbol in the below charts for “Make new drop loop”, this is the peg which the bunny ears will be created and secured.  The steps to do so are as follows: (The “bunny ears” pegs are worked from right to left, with the numbers in this direction: 1, 2, 3, 4.)

—Knit the first 2 pegs of the 4 bunny ears pegs (pegs 4 & 3).

—Insert a crochet hook between pegs 2 & 3 of the 4 and poke it through the eyelet directly below.

—Wrap WY around crochet hook and pull a new loop though the eyelet and out the front of the pegs.

—Lift the loop 3 and pass newly made loop behind the peg.  Replace the loop 3.

—Lift the loop 4 and pass the right side of the newly made loop over the peg.  Replace the loop 4.  Cinch newly made loop in, but not too tightly.

—Knit pegs 2 & 1 of the 4.

—Again insert the crochet hook between pegs 2 & 3 and poke it through the same eyelet directly below.

—Wrap WY around crochet hook and pull a new loop through the eyelet and out the front of the pegs.

—Lift the loop 2 and pass newly made loop behind the peg.  Replace loop 2.

—Lift the loop 1 and pass the left side of the newly made loop over the peg. Replace the loop 1.  Cinch newly made loop in, but not too tightly.

—Continue with the rest of the row.

—The next row will work all pegs 1 and 4 of the bunny ears pegs as 2 over 1.  Make sure that these 2 pegs are worked without much tension throughout.

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

Row 1: p1, , k2, p1, k2tog, yo, yo, ssk.

Row 2: k8.

Row 3: k4, make a new drop loop (see above instructions in Pattern Notes), k2, make a new drop loop.

Row 4: k8, working drop loop pegs as 2 over 1.

Row 5: k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, p1, k2, p1.

Row 6: k8.

Row 7: make a new drop loop, k2, make a new drop loop, k4.

Row 8: k8, working drop loop pegs as 2 over 1.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

 

Bunny Ears Square

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

 

Spring Bunnies Square angle

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1: p38.

Row 2: k38.

Row 3: p38.

Row 4: k38.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5:  p2, k5, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, k4, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 6:  k38.

Row 7:  p2, k5, *make a new drop loop, k2, make a new drop loop, k4, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 8: k38, working drop loop pegs as 2 over 1.

Row 9: p2, k1, *k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, p1, k2, p1, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 10: k38.

Row 11: p2, k1, *make a new drop loop, k2, make a new drop loop, k4, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 12: repeat Row 8.

Row 13: p2, k1, *p1, k2, p1, k2tog, yo, yo, ssk, repeat from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 14: k38.

Rows 15-54: repeat Rows 7-14.

Rows 55-59: repeat Rows 7-11.

Finishing Rows

Row 60: k38.

Row 61: p38.

Row 62: k38.

Row 63: p38.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

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Mar 7, 2016

Stitchology 19 : Irish Moss

March is the month filled with green and all things Irish!  Also known as Double Moss Stitch, this month’s design is another one of those wonderful stitches that consist of only knits and purls— perfect for a quick knit with loads of texture and possible future uses. This stitch’s compact nature resembles single crochet.  It also lays flat, and is completely identical from front to back, making it perfect for use on items that will be seen from both sides.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

 

Irish Moss Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in kiwi)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

This versatile stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to pretty much any type of project.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 4—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The abbreviation “rep” stands for “repeat”.

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 40 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  P40

Row 2:  K40

Row 3:  P40

Main Pattern Rows

Row 4:  K3, *p1, k1, rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 5: P3, *k1, p1, rep from * to last st, p1.

Row 6: K2, *p1, k1, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 7: P2, *k1, p1, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Rows 8-62:  Rep Rows 4-7, ending with Row 6.

Finishing Rows

Row 63: P40

Row 64:  K40

Row 65:  P40

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

8 Comments

  • Beautiful work, Bethany! Stitchology is such a fabulous resource for the loom knitting community.

  • It lists rows 4,5,6,7 then 10 then followed by rows8-62, in the written part I’m confused. Do we go to row 8 after 7 and repeat the pattern and for get about row 10 in written part?

  • Haha! Oopsie, you are correct. There was an errant row left in there from the template. I have corrected the pattern to *not* have that Row 10. ;) Thanks for the heads up!

  • Awww…thank you so much, Jenny! I hope it is and will remain so! :)

  • Absolutely beautiful Bethany! I feel inspired to make a dishcloth or an afghan square out of this. I love stitchology; I have learned so much from these articles. :)

  • Yay, thank you, Colleen! You make me smile, as inspiration and knowledge is the point of the whole column. I’m so happy to hear things like this to know that it is doing its job! :D

  • I have been looking all over for something like this…never thought to check out this blog. The idea behind stichology, and the way it is set up is great. I like that it has both charts and written instructions. Now I can finally make pretty well anything I want with my 28″ KB. Thanks for all the work you put into stitchology.

  • Cath, this is so nice of you…I’m so pleased to hear you enjoy Stitchology and find it so useful! :D We will be looking for the stitches featured in your future projects. :)

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Feb 1, 2016

Stitchology 18 : Hugs & Kisses

 

XOXOX, a symbol for hugs and kisses, is a term used for expressing sincerity, faith, love, or good friendship at the end of a written letter, email, or text message.  This practice has been in use clear back into the Middle Ages. Since most of the common people could not read or write, the ‘X’ was placed on documents, and a kiss was placed over it as a show of their sincerity.  The ‘o’ physically resembles a hug, and has joined the ‘X’ near signatures as a perfect pair to express love and friendship.  With Valentine’s Day coming up this month, it’s a perfect time to learn this stitch. :)

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)  To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Hugs & Kisses Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in berries)

Notions: Loom tool, cable needle, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 10 for repeats of the same column, or 20 for repeats of the 2 alternating columns.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.  The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap…except in the row before working the cables, as noted below.

The cables in this pattern involve trading the loops of 4 pegs in the correct order.  They are worked as follows:

*Note: It helps to e-wrap the knit stitches that sit right in line with the cable pegs in the row before the cable row to aid the cable stitches in stretching to their new places. Simply untwist the e-wrap loops when creating the cables.

[2/2RC]:  Worked over 4 pegs:

  • Lift the loops from the 2 right pegs of the 4 designated cable pegs and place them on the cable needle.  (*note: this is easy to remember— RC= right pegs first)
  • Move the 2 stitches on the left of the designated cable pegs over 2 pegs to the right.
  • Knit the 2 stitches you’ve just moved.  Place the stitches from the cable needle onto the now empty left pegs and knit them.  Pull out any slack from all 4 sts before moving on.

[2/2LC]: Worked over 4 pegs:

  • Lift the loop from the 2 left pegs of the 4 designated cable pegs and place them on the cable needle.  (*note: this is easy to remember— LC= left peg first)
  • Move the 2 stitches on the right of the designated cable pegs over 2 pegs to the left.
  • Place the stitches from the cable needle onto the now empty right pegs and knit them. Knit the 2 stitches on the left. Pull out any slack from all 4 sts before moving on.

 

Chart-Key-Hugs & Kisses

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

(*Note: Don’t let the abbreviations intimidate you!  It really is easy once you understand how to work each of the cables as described above.  I promise! :)  )

Rows 1 & 2:  p1, k8, p2, k8, p1.

(**Note: if you need extra room to cross those cable stitches, you can read Row 2 (and all rows right before a cable row) as: p1, ew8, p2, ew8, p1. Just make sure to untwist the e-wraps while working the cables.)

Row 3: p1, 2/2RC, 2/2LC, p2, 2/2LC, 2/1RC, p1.

Rows 4-6: rep Row 1.

Row 7: rep Row 3.

Rows 8-10: rep Row 1.

Row 11: p1, 2/2LC, 2/2RC, p2, 2/2RC, 2/1LC, p1.

Rows 12-14: rep Row 1.

Row 15: rep Row 11.

Row 16: rep Row 1.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Hugs n Kisses angle

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 44 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Rows 1-4: k2, p2, k2, p3, k2, [p2, k3, p2, k3] rep between [ ] once, p2, k2, p3, k2, p2, k2.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5:  k2, p1, *k8, p2, rep from * twice more, k8, p1, k2.

Row 6: p3, *k8, p2, rep from * twice more, k8, p3.

hugs n kisses close(**Note: the k8’s can be e-wraps here…see notes above.)

Row 7:  k2, p1, *2/2RC, 2/2LC, p2, 2/2LC, 2/1RC, p2, rep from * to last 3 sts, p1,  k2.

Row 8: rep Row 6.  (**Use regular knits/u-stitches here.)

Row 9: rep Row 5.

Row 10: rep Row 6. (**The k8’s can be e-wraps…see notes above.)

Row 11: rep Row 7.

Rows 12-14: rep Rows 8-10.

Row 15: k2, p1, *2/2LC, 2/2RC, p2, 2/2RC, 2/1LC, p2, rep from * to last 3 sts, p1,  k2.

Rows 16-18: rep Rows 8-10.

Row 19: rep Row 15.

Row 20: rep Row 8.

Row 21-60: Repeat Rows 5-20.

Finishing Rows

Rows 61-64: k2, p2, k2, p3, k2, [p2, k3, p2, k3] rep between [ ] once, p2, k2, p3, k2, p2, k2.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block well to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

1 Comment

  • Wonderful!

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