May 15, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Bind Off In Pattern? Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does “bind off in pattern” mean?  This is actually a question I haven’t seen in loom knitting at all.  But having seen “bind off in pattern” in needle knitting has really got me to thinking about binding off and different methods to bind off.

The most common bind off in loom knitting is the basic bind off.  This bind off is a great bind off for keeping the tension loose as you work the bind off instead of having to remember to work the previous row looser than normal.  But it does add an extra row of knit at the end.

This has prompted me to expand the basic bind off method to include purl stitch so the last row of purl can be the bind off when working garter stitch or even being able to use the basic bind off on ribbing or other stitch patterns  that isn’t all knits.  Which is where “bind off in pattern” comes into play.

Now let’s revisit the Basic Bind Off and then discuss how to bind off in pattern.  And then we will discuss how to make the Basic Bind Off more stretchy by adding a chain stitch between the bind off stitches without using a crochet hook.

 

Basic Bind Off – Original with Knit Stitch

Chain edge of the Basic Bind Off

 

The Basic Bind Off is always worked with the working yarn and gives a nice chain edge that matches the Chain Cast On.  And also matches the side edges when using the slip stitch.  More on using the slip stitch to create a nice chain edge in Loom FAQs:  To Slip or Not To Slip? That is the Frequently Asked Question

 

 

 

 

Now let’s discuss how to work the Basic Bind Off using all knit stitches like we all know and love.

The bind off is worked over 2 pegs at a time.  We will call them peg 1 and peg 2.

 

 

Step 1:  Knit peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2:  Knit peg 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3:  Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now there are 2 stitches on peg 1 and peg 2 is empty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4:  Lift the bottom loop on peg 1 over the top loop leaving only 1 stitch on peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 5:  Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 6:  Now rename the pegs so that the first peg with a stitch is peg 1 and the next is peg 2.

 

 

 

 

 

Repeat steps 2 – 6 until only 1 peg has a stitch.  Cut the working yarn leaving a tail long enough to weave in and pull the tail through the last stitch to remove it from the loom.

 

Basic Bind Off with Garter Stitch ending on the Knit Row

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Bind Off – In Pattern including Purl Stitch

What does bind off in pattern mean exactly?  It means that the stitches worked on the basic bind off match the stitches in the stitch pattern used.

Wait…  What????

Here is where the explanation gets a bit trickier, but I will do the best I can.

Say the project being worked on is in garter stitch.  And you want to bind off on the purl row instead of working the purl row then binding off with that extra row of knit.

You will then need to work the basic bind off but purl the stitches instead of knitting them.

 

Basic Bind Off with Garter Stitch ending on the purl row

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or you are ending a project in rib stitch.  Then you would need to work each stitch on the bind off to match the rib stitch for that row.

 

Basic Bind Off using Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Bind Off with Rib Stitch while Stretched

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or you are using the seed stitch.  You will need to work each stitch of the bind off to match the seed stitch for that row.

Those previous 3 examples are what it means to bind off in pattern.  Your bind off matches your stitch pattern.

Now let’s try to write it out without it getting too confusing.

The bind off is still worked over 2 pegs at a time.  We will still call them peg 1 and peg 2.

Step 1:  Using the stitch that will keep the stitch pattern going for the row, work peg 1.

Step 2:  Then work peg 2 in the stitch pattern.

If it is garter and you are binding off on the purl row, then you will purl peg 1 and peg 2.  If it’s a 1×1 rib with the first stitch on the row being knit and the second stitch being purl, then you will knit peg 1 and purl peg 2.  Or whatever stitch pattern you are using.

Step 3:  Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.  Now there are 2 stitches on peg 1 and peg 2 is empty.

Step 4:  Lift the bottom loop on peg 1 over the top loop leaving only 1 stitch on peg 1.

Step 5:  Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2.

Step 6:  Now rename the pegs so that the first peg with a stitch is peg 1 and the next is peg 2.  Just remember that you will need to keep up with which peg needs a knit or a purl depending on what your stitch pattern is.

Repeat steps 2 – 6 until only 1 peg has a stitch.  Cut the working yarn leaving a tail long enough to weave in and pull the tail through the last stitch to remove it from the loom.

 

Basic Bind Off – Added Chain Stitch Between Bind Off Stitches

Sometimes it is hard to keep the tension loose enough so that the bind off is not too tight.  We all struggle with that.

What I always recommend is when working the bind off, make sure the stitch is very loose to the point you think it will be too loose.  But it is hard to keep all the stitches the same as you work them.

 

 

Here is a variation of the basic bind off where a chain stitch is added between each stitch giving the bind off edge more stretch.  And best part is a crochet hook is not need to work this bind off.

 

 

 

 

 

But this bind off will leave a little hole between each stitch because of the extra chain between the stitches.

 

 

 

 

 

Note:  I will use “knit” for the stitch to work each peg.  But purl stitch can also be used on any peg to bind off in pattern except when an e-wrap knit is used to make the extra chain.

The bind off is worked over 2 pegs at a time.  We will call them peg 1 and peg 2.

Step 1:  Knit peg 1.

 

 

Step 2:  E-wrap knit peg 1 again by bringing the working yarn behind peg 1 again and knitting over.  This is what creates the extra chain stitch.

 

 

 

 

Step 3:  Knit peg 2.

Step 4:  Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.  Now there are 2 stitches on peg 1 and peg 2 is empty.

Step 5:  Lift the bottom loop on peg 1 over the top loop leaving only 1 stitch on peg 1.

Step 6:  Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2.

Step 7:  Now rename the pegs so that the first peg with a stitch is peg 1 and the next is peg 2.

Repeat steps 2 – 7 until only 1 peg has a stitch.  Cut the working yarn leaving a tail long enough to weave in and pull the tail through the last stitch to remove it from the loom.

 

Now that the Basic Bind Off has been expanded to include more than just knit stitches, the bind off world is endless.  Just remember to keep in mind your tension so the bind off edge is not too tight.

Keep on loom knitting!

    Renita Harvey . 1 Comment . share this post: Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Delicious Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Digg Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Facebook Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Google+ Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on LinkedIn Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Pinterest Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on reddit Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on StumbleUpon Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Twitter Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Add to Bookmarks Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Email Share 'Loom FAQs:  How Do I Bind Off In Pattern?  Or Beyond The Basic Bind Off…' on Print Friendly

1 Comment

  • I was working on a rib pattern and I tried binding off in pattern using your excellent tutorial and it turned out fantastic. I hope this tutorial will be permanently stored in the “Learn” section of the web site. Actually there are many of these types of learning tutorials that would be easier for beginners to find if they were all stored in one place. Thank you for teaching us this nice techinque.

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