Jun 20, 2016

Loom FAQs: What Are Selvages?

Loom FAQs

 

 

 

 

One of the most commonly questioned topics in loom knitting is edges.  How do I get my edges to match?  How do I keep my edges from curling?  How do I make pretty edges??  

While there are are different ways to keep those edges clean and pretty (some of these ways are discussed in Loom FAQs:  To Slip or Not To Slip?  and Loom FAQs:  Why Do Knits Curl?), there is one word that popped up that I never associated with knitting.  Only with sewing.  And that word is “selvage”.

So let’s talk edges and what they have to with a selvage.

What is a selvage?

A selvage is the edge of a woven fabric that will not unravel.  It is different from the rest of the fabric making a narrow border.  Usually is it a bit thicker than the fabric itself.

While most people are familiar with the selvages on fabric in sewing, a selvage can be knit on the edges of any flat panel project creating a nice, clean, slightly thicker edge.

The word selvage comes from the combining of the words “self” and “edge”.  The word originates in late Middle English of the mid 1400’s.

How do I work a selvage in knitting on a loom?

There are 2 different selvages that we will discuss:  double selvage and triple selvage.  Either one can be worked with any stitch pattern.  I will show each selvage on stockinette and on garter stitch.

Sometime this method is called an i-cord edge.

Each method is worked over 2 rows and repeated for the entire project.

Each method will be written first then demonstrated with pictures.

Before we get started, please do not read the written and think it is too hard.  Nothing is too hard.  Please remember that you just need to sit down and work it stitch by stitch.  Do not let the abbreviations intimidate you.  YOU CAN DO THIS!  I believe in you.

Abbreviations for written instructions:

k:  knit

p:  purl

s:  slip/skip

wyif:  working yarn in front

wyib:  working yarn in back

st(s):  stitch(es)

Double Selvage

Double selvage with stockinette stitch – front

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double selvage stockinette stitch - back

Double selvage stockinette stitch – back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double selvage with garter stitch body

Double selvage with garter stitch body

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When working the double selvage on a flat panel, you will need to add 4 stitches to whatever stitch pattern you will be working, 2 for each side.

Written Instructions:

Row 1:  s1 wyib, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 2 pegs), s1 wyib, p1

Row 2:  s1 wyif, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 2 pegs), s1 wyib, k1

Repeat rows 1 – 2 for the length of the project.

 

Now for some photos…

Row 1:

sl1wyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

knit peg 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2:  knit the stitch on the peg

 

Work desired stitch pattern until last 2 pegs.

 

slwyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg:  slip stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch unworked

 

purl last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg:  purl the stitch on the peg

 

Row 2:

sl1wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1 on row 2:  slip stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bringing the working yarn in front of the work, and replacing the loop back onto the peg.

 

knit next to last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2 on row 2:  knit the stitch

Work desired stitch pattern until last 2 pegs.

slwyib row 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg on row 2:  slip stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

knit last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg on row 2:  knit the stitch

 

Repeat rows 1 and 2 for the entire project.

 

Triple Selvage

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch – front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch - back

Triple selvage with stockinette stitch – back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triple selvage with garter stitch

Triple selvage with garter stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When working the triple selvage on a flat panel, you will need to add 6 stitches to whatever stitch pattern you will be working, 3 for each side.

Written Instructions:

Row 1:  s1 wyib, s1 wyif, k1, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 3 pegs), k1, s1 wyif, p1

Row 2:  s1 wyif, p1, s1 wyib, (work the row in desired stitch pattern until the last 3 pegs), s1 wyib, p1, k1

 

Now for some photos…

Row 1:

sl1wyib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

peg 2 sl wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

knit peg 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 3:  knit the stitch

Continue with desired stitch pattern for the body of the work until the last 3 pegs.

 

2nd to last peg:  Knit stitch on peg (not shown)

 

slwyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

purl last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg:  Purl the stitch on the peg.

 

Row 2:

 

sl1wyif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 1 on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in front (sl1 wyif) by lifting the loop off the peg, bring the working yarn in front of the work, and replace loop back on peg leaving the stitch unworked.

 

purl peg 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 2 on row 2:  Purl stitch on peg.

 

sl back 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peg 3 on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

Continue with desired stitch pattern until the last 3 stitches.

 

slip back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd to last peg on row 2:  slip the stitch with working yarn in back (sl1 wyib) by bringing the working yarn BEHIND the peg, leaving the stitch on the peg unworked.

 

purl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to last peg on row 2:  purl stitch on peg

 

knit last peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last peg on row 2:  knit stitch on peg

 

Repeat rows 1 and 2 for the entire project.

 

For those of you who like to find the patterns in life like I do, here is something that may help.

For the pegs that have knit stitches, the slipped stitch is in the back on the next row.

For the pegs that have purl stitches, the slipped stitch is in the front on the next row.

This is for the selvage only.  This will not apply for whatever stitch pattern used for the body of the work.

 

Well I hope you are as excited about selvages as I am!  Happy loom knitting!

    Renita Harvey . Comments Off on Loom FAQs: What Are Selvages? . share this post: Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Delicious Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Digg Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Facebook Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Google+ Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on LinkedIn Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Pinterest Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on reddit Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on StumbleUpon Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Twitter Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Add to Bookmarks Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Email Share 'Loom FAQs:  What Are Selvages?' on Print Friendly

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