Feb 20, 2017

Loom FAQs: Is It Garter, Rib, or Seed Stitch?

 

 

 

 

 

The great thing about learning the purl stitch is that when combined with the knit stitch the possibilities seem to become limitless.  There are lots of stitch patterns that only include a combination of knit and purl stitches.

But the first ones learned include garter, rib, and seed stitches.  This is when the confusion comes into play.  All 3 include the instructions of 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  Beginners tend to get this confused.  Does K1, P1 mean rows or stitches?  What makes rib and seed different?  Why does my seed stitch not look correct?  Why does my rib stitch look weird?  You mean to tell me that isn’t the garter stitch?  But that is what I was told…  It goes on and on.

Let’s begin with our basic stitches again.  I won’t go into all the knit stitches since you can find all that information in Loom FAQs:  Which Knit Stitch??.  It explains the different names and way of working the knit stitch on a knitting loom.  But I will recap the true knit stitch and the purl stitch here for convenience.

 

What is the difference between the true knit stitch and the purl stitch?

Working the true or traditional knit stitch is very similar to how a purl stitch is worked.  There really is only 1 difference.  The purl is basically a backward knit stitch so you are just working the knit stitch backward.

Now I know that statement was confusing so let’s see how each stitch is worked through the magic of photography.

Knit Stitch

In patterns when it says knit and doesn’t specify which method of knit stitch, it most likely means to use the true knit stitch.  The other methods except e-wrap are just for ease or tension purposes.  The reason that I do not include e-wrap in that statement is that e-wrap is a twisted knit stitch and will give the finished work a different look.

 

 

To work the knit stitch, bring the working yarn across the TOP of the loop on the peg.

Then bring the loom pick from the bottom, up through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn down through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

Purl Stitch

There is only 1 way to work the purl stitch.  And it is not spelled pearl.  Pearls are what is not suppose to be before swine.  Purls are for knitting.

 

To work the purl stitch, bring the working yarn across the BOTTOM of the loop on the peg.  This is where the confusion between the knit and purl stitch happens.

Then bring the loom pick from the top, down through the loop, and catch the working yarn.

 

 

 

 

 

Pull the working yarn up through the loop on the peg creating a new loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the old loop off the peg and place the new loop on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tighten the stitch.  Remember not to pull it too tight.  Just snug around a the peg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To recap, the knit stitch is from the top, and the purl is from the bottom.

 

Knit & Purl Stitch Patterns

Now on to the different stitches created by using both knit and purl stitches.  Since I will be writing out the instructions like they are written in patterns, you can refresh your memory on how to read a pattern in Loom FAQs:  How Do I Read A Pattern?

Also if you need a refresher on how to identify a knit stitch from a purl stitch, you can read how in Loom FAQs:  Is It A Knit Or Purl?

Abbreviations

K:  Knit

P:  Purl

 

Garter Stitch

Garter Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Row 1:  K all

Row 2:  P all

Repeat rows 1 – 2

 

What is a garter ridge?

Garter stitch is always written by rows.  2 rows equals 1 garter ridge.  Therefore if a pattern says to work a certain number of garter ridges, you will need to work twice that many rows since each ridge is equal to 2 rows.

 

Rib Stitch

1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 1×1 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a few variations of the rib stitch.  1×1 rib is what I will explain.  There is also a 2×2 rib and 3×3 rib stitches.

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

When working the rib stitch, each row must have the knits on the same pegs as the knit stitches and purls on the same pegs as the purl stitches in previous row/round for each row/round.  This makes the columns of knits and purls that creates the ribbing.

 

What if I am working in the round with an odd number peg count?

You will then need to add an extra knit or purl on that last peg before starting the new round.  I like adding an extra purl since it will not be noticed as much as an extra knit.  As you can see in the pictures above, the purls like to hide between the knit stitches.

 

Which version of the rib stitch is the stretchiest?

2×2 ribbing is the stretchiest of the rib stitches which makes it the best choice for cuffs on socks.

2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stretched 2×2 Rib Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed Stitch

Seed Stitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to the nature of seed stitch, the stitch pattern is written differently depending on if it’s a flat panel or in the round and whether it is even or odd stitch count.

 

For even number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to end

Repeat row 1.

 

For even number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to the end

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the end

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts on flat panels:

Row 1:  *K1, P1, repeat from * to the next to last peg, K1

Row 2:  *P1, K2, repeat from * to the next to the last peg, P1

Repeat rows 1 – 2.

 

For odd number peg counts in the round:

Round 1:  *K1, P1, repeat to last peg, K1

Round 2:  *P1, K1, repeat to the last peg, P1

Repeat rounds 1 – 2.

 

What makes seed stitch different from rib stitch?

While the rib stitch has the columns of knits and purls, seed stitch must have the knits on top of the purls of the previous row and purls on top of the knits of the previous row.  This is why the peg count makes the instructions different between even peg counts and odd peg counts.

 

What is the difference between seed stitch and moss stitch?

The seed stitch and the moss stitch are the exact same stitch.  Just depends on where you live what this stitch is called.

 

Do any of these stitches curl?

No.  When worked correctly, all 3 of these stitches will not curl making them all great options for hat brims and borders for flat panels.

Also the back of the these stitches are the same as the front.

 

I really do hope this helps explain the differences between these 3 stitches that all involve 1 of knit and 1 of purl.  It can be confusing at first.  But carry on!  Work a swatch with each one.  This will help get it in your brain better on how each one is different.

Then you will be ready for the plethora of other stitch patterns that only use knit and purl stitches.

Happy loom knitting!

 

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Feb 20, 2017

Spiraling Rope Stitch (double knit)

This is a version of a favorite Rib Stitch in Double Knit. These wide ribs will make a great sweater, vest or blanket.  Even our beginners will enjoy a new twist to the knit/rib stitch.

stitch_purple

This Spiraling Rope Stitch reminds us of a wide rib, but it’s actually a shifting rib, front to back. It’s also great for a scarf or afghan that gets flipped over and over. Can’t tell the front from the back. It’s very stretchy and fun to work up.

Each rib is approximately 3/4″ wide and the inset is the center of the rib on opposite side, so it shifts after each set of double stitches.

 

spiral rope purple

0      1           2          3           4          5          6           7          8            9          10          1         12

Loom: 10” knitting loom, or any loom with 21+ pegs with a width of 1 cm between the rails.

In this stitch, you will work with any amount of stitches divisible by 3.

Yarn: Worsted weight #4 wool or blend. Our sample is worked with Lion Brand Heartland Worsted weight yarn.

Abbreviations:  L=left, R=right

Instructions:

Cast On 21 stitches (or as many as desired with multiple of 3).  Start on L end of loom on top peg 3.

Step 1: Place slipknot on peg 3 top.

Step 2: Come down to lower peg 3 and wrap counter-clockwise.

Step 3: Take yarn up to peg 6 top wrapping clockwise, and then down to lower peg 6 counter-clockwise.

Step 4: Skip 2 pegs and take yarn up to peg 9 top wrapping clockwise, and then down to lower peg 9 and wrap counter-clockwise.

Step 5: Continue across the loom till you have wrapped the last stitch of your pattern. In our sample, we are illustrating only the first 12 stitches.  Notice on the last wrap, the yarn goes around the outside of pegs.  Turn loom around.

Step 6-the return: Take yarn to first of 2 empty pegs, peg 10 top and down to lower peg 11. Continue up to top peg 11 wrapping in counter-clockwise direction. Continue down to lower peg 10, wrapping in clockwise direction.

Step 7: Work all empty pegs in same manner until you end at lower peg 1. Lay anchor yarn.

Repeat all steps 1 thru 7 in each row. Work until your square/project is as long as desired. Bind off at loom and anchor yarn once complete.

Note:  You may like to start with a Stockinette cast on, and one row of stockinette at end of work for easy bind offs.  This is done in sample.

Let’s look at the Spiraling Rope on the loom with each step:  After cast on, starting with the 3rd peg, wrap to end of stitches.  Return by wrapping last pegs straight across at end of loom.  Follow diagram and wrap all empty pegs as you return

Here you are completing the wrap.  And then last photo is a completed row, ready to hook over.  Just continue weaving this row until the knitted piece is as long as desired, or you feel that you have learned the Spiraling Rib stitch.

 

Rib Stitch Variations! Twisted Purl Stitch (tan) Spiraling Rib Stitch (pink), and the Bamboo Stitch (white).

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1 Comment

  • I especially like that bamboo stitch. Have you ever shown how to do that one before?

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Feb 14, 2017

Stitchology 29: Lacy Hearts

We will be changing the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Special Stitch Instructions

*All yarn overs (yo) are completed by laying the working yarn loosely across the front of the peg, not e-wrapping.

*For ease in reading the directions below, the steps  involving yarn overs and eyelets are placed inside brackets [ ] to let you know that they are all accomplished on just two or three pegs.

There are three ways of creating eyelets for this pattern: the Knit 2 Together (k2tog) for a right leaning eyelet worked as a knit, the Slip, Slip, Knit (ssk) for a left leaning eyelet worked as a knit, and a Knit 3 Together (k3tog), a decrease that creates an eyelet on either side.  The following dictates how to work these stitches as you will find them in the stitch pattern:

[k2tog, yo]:  Worked from right to left. Move the loop from yo peg to the k2tog peg. Knit the k2tog peg, working the two bottom loops as one. Loosely carry the WY across the front of the empty yo peg and continue to the next stitch as the pattern dictates.

[yo, ssk]: Worked from right to left. Move the loop from yo peg to the ssk peg. Loosely carry the WY across the front of the empty yo peg, then knit the next peg, working the two loops as one.

[yo, k3tog, yo]: (As seen in Row 7 of the pattern) Worked from right to left. Move the loops from the yo pegs to the k3tog peg.  Carry the WY loosely across the first empty yo peg, then work all 3 loops as 1 on the k3tog peg. Carry the WY loosely across the front of the next empty yo peg and work the next stitch as the pattern dictates.

Chart for Repeating Stitch Pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working both as a flat panel and in the round  (Begin from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1:  *yo, ssk, k6, rep from *

Row 2 and all even rows to Row 16:  knit all

Row 3: *k1, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, rep from *

Row 5:  *k2, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, rep from *

Row 7:  *yo, k3tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, rep from *

Row 9:  *k4, yo, ssk, k2, rep from *

Row 11:  *k2, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k1, rep from *

Row 13:  *k1, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, rep from *

Row 15:  *k2, yo, ssk, yo, k3tog, yo, k1, rep from *

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

11 Comments

  • Please still include a picture of the knit square so have a reference instead of going to blog to view when knitting it. Thanks

  • Hi Bethany I love this column and am hooked on loom knitting but my previous comment regarding a picture Is just that I want to see the finished product just as you had previously. The video idea is absolutely fantastic and makes the stitches so easy to understand. Thanks so much for this column!

  • I want to continue with the 8 by 8 squares
    How many repeats should I do
    How many repeats across and what should I do for the ends
    Also how much wool
    What color and make and yardage of wool to make square
    This info was included on the other squares
    Also I would like it if you had the graphic of the entire square as before

    I love the video it is so clear
    Excellent but would appreciate the other info
    Thank you for any attention to this as I do want to continue the squares

  • Hi Maureen :)

    You are right…the photo of the square square should also be featured, and it has been added for your convenience. I’m so glad to hear you like the video!

    Bethany~

  • Hi Ginny :)

    I will let you in on a little secret: due to the extra time involved with creating the video, an entire pattern for the square will not be posted here, but the chart for an 8″ x 8″ square and yarn information is currently located at the Ravelry page for the stitch. I hope this will help you continue to make gorgeous stitches with us! :) http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lacy-hearts-stitchology-29

    Bethany~

  • I have just taken an interest in loom knitting, can you tell me what that casting on gadget is called so I can get one, and why in some patterns do you skip pegs? How do you decide which pegs to skip?

  • Hi Janice :)

    I’m not exactly sure what you mean by “casting on gadget”…do you mean the loom tool/hook that is used to work the stitches on the loom? I use a crochet hook to actually begin the project to add stitches to the loom. Either one of these tools can be found at your local craft stores, and the loom tool can be found at knittingboard.com.

    There are several reasons why you would skip a peg in a project. One is to create eyelets, which you see demonstrated here in this post. Another is to “slip” a stitch, which is simply to skip it. This is done 1) on the first peg of every row to create a nicely finished chain look on the edges of your knitted item, and 2) in the project itself to cause the loop from the row below to be pulled up and elongated a bit when it is knitted on the row following the row with the slipped stitch. Occasionally a stitch is slipped and the working yarn is actually carried to the front of the knitting instead of the back. This creates an interesting texture in your knitting, with a horizontal line across that slipped stitch in the finished piece.

  • Thank you that info was very helpful
    Also thanks for the terrific videos
    I love them all

  • I am having a problem with taking the yarn over
    I am using the u knit stitch
    It’s way too tight to move over
    Any hints how to make easier for that yarn over
    Is it the worsted wool or just my tension
    Help

  • Ginny…yep! It all comes down to tension how easy it is to move the stitches around. You’ll just want to loosen up your u-stitches by pulling the hook back a little bit extra when you knit off your loops. ;)

  • Lovely work, Sunshine!

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Feb 14, 2017

Lovely Bun Hat

In love with February and its promises of warm weather; the sun shines brighter, the afternoons get longer, and the specks of red surround us as a reminder of life!

LOOM: Hat loom, 42 pegs at large gauge.

YARN:  Approx 90 yards bulky merino blend yarn (85 yds MC, 5 yds CC). Cascade Yarns Pacific Bulky in Cream (MC) and Ruby (CC) were used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, crochet hook (to bind off).

GAUGE: 10.25 sts x 15 rows=4” in stockinette.

SIZE:  Fits youth, up to 19” head.

ABBREVIATIONS

K=Knit stitch (recommend the true knit stitch, not the ewrap).
P=Purl stitch
CO=Cast on
Approx=Approximately
BBO=Basic bind off method
MC=Main color (cream)
CC=Contrasting color (ruby)
Rnd(s)=Round(s)
St(s)=stitch(es)

INSTRUCTIONS

Assemble the knitting loom to 42, at large gauge.

With MC, CO 42 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1-10: *k1, p1; rep from * to end of rnd. (Approx 3”)
Rnd 11: k to end of rnd.
Rep Rnd 11: until item measures approx. 7” from CO edge.

Remove all stitches from the knitting loom to a piece of scrap yarn.

Using crochet hook, start bind off 2 sts at a time.

Video:

Using CC yarn and tapestry needle, use the duplicate stitch technique to place the heart motif on the hat.

Weave in all ends. Gently tug on the hat vertically to set the stitches. Block lightly.

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Feb 12, 2017

Gardens in Giverny

Giverny is a community near the River Seine.  It is a place that Claude Monet once called home.  In Giverny, he created beautiful gardens which served as inspiration for many of his paintings, including his famous Water Lilies series.  The colors in this lovely wrap felt very botanical to me.  The elongated stitches give the wrap a gorgeous drape and flowing feel.  I hope you will enjoy creating a ‘Garden’ of your very own.

 

LOOM:  18” All-in-One Loom

YARN:  2 skeins Red Heart Soft in Guacamole and 1 skein Red Heart Soft in Watercolors.

NOTIONS:  Knitting Tool, Scissors, Tapestry Needle, Tape Measure, Cable Needle

GAUGE: 16 sts and 24 rows = 4” in twisted stockinette

SIZE:  14” x 40” before blocking

 

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

CO=Cast on

k=knit stitch (note: the u-wrap knit stitch is recommended for this project)

k2tog=knit 2 together

p=purl stitch

rnd(s)=round(s)

Rem=remain

Rep=repeat

st(s)=stitch(es)

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Using the Guacamole yarn, cast on 62 stitches.

Rows 1, 3 & 5:  Knit all stitches.

Rows 2, 4 & 6:  Purl all stitches.

Row 7:  *Knit peg.  Wrap same peg 4 times.  Rep from * to end of row.

Row 8:  Peg 1- begin purl in bottom stitch on peg.  Drop top 4 wraps from peg.  Finish purl stitch.  *Next 6 pegs – drop the top 4 wraps from each peg.  Each peg will have a stitch on it and a long loop behind it.  Carefully place the stitches from pegs 6, 5, and 4 on the cable needle.  Drop the cable needle to the center of the loom temporarily.  Move the stitch from peg 3 to peg 6, the stitch from peg 2 to peg 5, and the stitch from peg 1 to peg 4.  From the cable needle – move stitch 4 to peg 1, stitch 5 to peg 2, and stitch 6 to peg 3.  Purl pegs 1-6.  Rep from * until the last peg.  Last peg – begin purl in bottom stitch on peg.  Drop top 4 wraps from peg.  Finish purl stitch.

Using the Watercolors yarn, repeat rows 1-8.

Alternate colors and repeat rows 1-8 until panel reaches approximately 40” in length.  End with the Guacamole yarn.  Continuing with the Guacamole color, repeat rows 1-6 once more.

Remove panel from the loom using the basic bind off method.  Weave in all yarn ends.  Lightly steam to block.

 

ASSEMBLY

Lay the knitted panel down.

Fold the left side down as shown below:

Fold the right side down as shown below:

Seam the two sides together using the tapestry needle:

 

The following pictures are close up shots of the seaming process:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the seaming is finished, complete the project by weaving in the yarn ends.

 

 

7 Comments

  • What a beautiful design, Jenny…so elegant and definitely brings garden-y thoughts to mind! :)

  • Jenny this is truly amazing looking you seize to amaze me with your loom knitting talents

  • Jenny this is absolutely stunning! I love the imagery that you painted for me :).

  • Thank you!

  • Thank you, Kathy! That is very kind of you to say :)

  • ps- I have wanted to visit France since I was in high school, lol. Maybe I will one day find my way there :)

  • Thank you, Sunshine!

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Jan 29, 2017

Eureka Knee Highs

Keep your feet and legs comfy and warm with these knee highs knit in luxurious merino superwash wool.  Wear them pulled up for knee highs or let them gather around the ankles as slouchy socks.

KNITTING LOOM: Sock Loom 2

YARN:  300 yrds of worsted weight superwash wool yarn.  Plymouth Select Worsted Merino Superwash in color #43 (100% superwash merino wool, 218 yards per hank)

NOTIONS:  knitting tool, tapestry needle, 2 double pointed needles

GAUGE: 10 sts x 16 rounds = 2” in flat knit stitch

SIZE:  Fits a women’s size 8.  To make the socks larger/smaller, work more/less rounds in the foot area.

 

ABBREVIATIONS

k=knit stitch (note: Work the knits on cuff with the true knit stitch.  Work the knits on the rest of the sock with the flat knit stitch.).

p=purl stitch, CO=Cast on, st(s)=stitch(es), rnd(s)=round(s), Rep=repeat, W&T=wrap & turn (Remove the stitch from the peg.  Wrap the working yarn around the peg by bringing it to the back of the peg and around to the front of the peg so the working yarn ends up at the front of the loom ready to work the next stitch.)

INSTRUCTIONS (Make 2)

CO 40 pegs and prepare to work in the round

Leg

Rnds 1 – 15: P all

Rnds 16 – 20:  K all

Rnds 21 – 30:  P all

Rnds 31 – 75:  rep rnds 16 – 30, 3 times

Rnds 76 – 80:  *K2, P2, rep from * around

Rnds 81 – 95:  K all

 

Heel

Short row heel over 20 pegs

Row 1:  K pegs 1 – 19, W&T peg 20

Row 2:  K pegs 19 – 2, W&T peg 1

Row 3:  K pegs 2 – 18, W&T peg 19

Row 4:  K pegs 18 – 3, W&T peg 2

Row 5:  K pegs 3 – 17, W&T peg 18

Row 6:  K pegs 17 – 4, W&T peg 3

Row 7:  K pegs 4 – 16, W&T peg 17

Row 8:  K pegs 16 – 5, W&T peg 4

Row 9:  K pegs 5 – 15, W&T peg 16

Row 10:  K pegs 15 – 6, W&T peg 5

Row 11:  K pegs 6 – 14, W&T peg 15

Row 12:  K pegs 14 – 7, W&T peg 6

Row 13:  K pegs 7 – 13, W&T peg 14

Row 14:  K pegs 13 – 8, W&T peg 7

Row 15:  K pegs 8 – 14, W&T peg 15

Row 16:  K pegs 14 – 7, W&T peg 6

Row 17:  K pegs 7 – 15, W&T peg 16

Row 18:  K pegs 15 – 6, W&T peg 5

Row 19:  K pegs 6 – 16, W&T peg 17

Row 20:  K pegs 16 – 5, W&T peg 4

Row 21:  K pegs 5 – 17, W&T peg 18

Row 22:  K pegs 17 – 4, W&T peg 3

Row 23:  K pegs 4 – 18, W&T peg 19

Row 24:  K pegs 18 – 3, W&T peg 2

Row 25:  K pegs 3 – 19, W&T peg 20

Row 26:  K pegs 19 – 2, W&T peg 1

 

Sole and Foot

 Next rnd:  K all

Rep last rnd until foot measures 7” from the heel or 1.5” – 2” less than the length of the foot (depending on snugness desired).

 

Toe

Rep short row heel instructions for the toe.

When finished, there will 3 loops on pegs 1 and 20.  Lift the bottom wraps over the top loop on both pegs.

 

 

Grafting the Toe Close

Remove stitches from pegs 40 – 21 and place on one double pointed needle.

Remove the remaining stitches on a second double pointed needle.

Using the kitchener stitch, graft the toe closed.

Instructions for grafting with the kitchener stitch with needles can be found in Loom FAQs:  What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?

Alternate method of grafting:  Using the method demonstrated in Loom FAQs:  What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?, transfer the stitches from pegs 1 – 20 to pegs 40 – 21 and use the kitchener stitch to graft the toe closed.

 

If you have questions or comments, please feel free to contact Renita Harvey by leaving a comment below.

 

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Jan 22, 2017

Nyahbelle’s Mermaid Tail

Every little girl at some point dreams of being a little mermaid. Let your little one’s imagination come to life with this cozy mermaid tail cocoon.

LOOM:  Knitting loom: 28” with Extenders (168 pegs total) + 6 peg sliders (2).

YARN: Approx 2,000 yards of worsted weight wool blend. Knit Picks Chroma, 70% superwash wool, 30% nylon, 198 yds/100g (10 balls) in Lupine color was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Cable needle, knitting tool, row counter (optional), cable needle

GAUGE: 9 sts x 13 rnds = 2” in stockinette

SIZE: 48” L x 17  W cocoon; 26” tail length.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately
k=knit stitch (note: the true knit stitch is recommended for this project with this type of yarn)
p=purl stitch
CO=Cast on
st(s)=stitch(es)
rnd(s)=round(s)
Rem=remain
st(s)=stitch(es)
cn=cable needle
Back Cross (BCP)=With the working yarn held to the front of the loom, slip 1 stitch to cn and hold towards the center of the loom (peg is now empty), knit the next peg then move this loop to the emptied peg, place the stitch from the cn on the empty peg then proceed to purl it.
Front Cross (FCP)=With the working yarn held to the center of the loom, slip 1 stitch to cn and hold towards the front of the loom between the pegs (peg is now empty), purl the next peg then move this loop to the emptied peg, place the peg from the cn on the empty peg, proceed to knit it.

Basic Hourglass Chart-multiple of 8 sts

INSTRUCTIONS

Set the knitting at 168 pegs, using the peg extenders.

Cast on 168 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1, 3, 5, 7, 9: k to end of row.

Row 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: p to end of row.

Row 11: k8, [work Row 1 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 12: p8, [work Row 2 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8

Row 13: k8, [work Row 3 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 14: p8, [work Row 4 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8

Row 15: k8, [work Row 5 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 16: p8, [work Row 6 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row 17: k8, [work Row 7 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 18: p8, [work Row 8 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  19: k8, [work Row 9 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 20: p8, [work Row 10 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  21: k8, [work Row 11 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 22: p8, [work Row 12 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  23: k8, [work Row 13 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 24: p8, [work Row 14 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Row  25: k8, [work Row 15 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, k8.

Row 26: p8, [work Row 16 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern] 20x, p8.

Rep Row 11-Row 26: 4 more times.

From this point forward, you will be working in the round. Join to work in the round.

**Next Rnd: work Rnd 1 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 2 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 3 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 4 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 5 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 6 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 7 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 8 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 9 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 10 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 11 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 12 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 13 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 14 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 15 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.

Next Rnd: work Rnd 16 of Basic Hourglass stitch pattern.**

Rep from ** to ** 12 more times.

Next 4 rnds: *k2, p2; rep from * to end.

Remove all the stitches off the knitting loom onto a piece of contrasting color yarn.

Adjust the knitting loom and set it to 84 pegs using the 6 peg sliders, instead of the extenders.

Place the stitches back on the knitting loom, placing two stitches per peg.

Next rnd: *k2tog, p2tog; rep from * to end. (84 sts).

Basic bind off.

Centering the vertical opening at the cast on edge (created by the first 130 rows), sew the bind off section flat using the mattress stitch.

Weave all ends in.

Fin

(Make 2)

Cast on 84 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1: k to end.

Row 2: p2tog, p to end.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2 until 20 sts remain.

Bind off with basic bind off method.

Mattress stitch together the two bind off edges.

Assembly

Centering the seam from the first 130 rows (where the opening is at the top of the cocoon), mattress stitch the straight edge of the tail around the cocoon, starting at the midpoint on the back of the tail and continuing to the front then around the back of the tail to the midpoint.

 

 

 

Have questions or comments, please feel free to contact Isela Phelps by leaving a comment below. 

 

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9 Comments

  • I want to say this looks amazing!! I am just having a trouble with the bcp and fcp. I don’t understand “slip stitch to cn” then how the beg becomes empty. Thank you for all your help.

  • You are removing the loop from the peg and putting it on a cable needle.

  • Need a video of this.

  • Is there any way this could be done on the super afghan loom? Just curious. Thank you.

  • Can you do this on the super afghan loom? I don’t have the 28″ knitting loom with extenders. Thank you.

  • Donna, the pattern starts off as a flat panel and then you have to knit it in the round. You could knit it all flat then seam it but as it is written, it was designed to be knitted in the round.

  • Thank you. After reading the pattern I think it would be easier if I just invested in the 28″ loom. I can always use a new one in my collection. I already have 7 different looms you all sell and I use them all. Keep making them and I will keep buying them!

  • I think this is amazing. I have just taken an interest in loom knitting and I am wondering if you can help me with two random questions.

    1. Where can I find that casting tool that is used to cast on? what is it called?
    2. Why do you skip pegs for some patterns and how do you decide which ones to skip?

  • Is there a video of how to do the hourglass stitch from left to right and then right to left? I am confused which part of the cross has the purl stitch. Thank you!

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Jan 19, 2017

Poncho with Fingerless Mittens (double knit)

This poncho pattern comes with matching fingerless mittens.Fun and easy to wear for all sizes-warm, but not bulky! When a coat is too much, but it’s chilly out, this poncho is perfect.

Loom: 28” Loom +Extenders Set up for double knit using small wood spacers at 1 cm spacing

Yarn: Patons Shetland Chunky, 75% Acrylic, 25% Wool #5, aprox 121 yds per skein. Total used in sample is 14 skeins. Color is Med Blue.

Stitches: Stockinette, Knit and Purl

Notions: Knit hook, Crochet hook, Sewing/darning needle

Size: One size fits most adults.

Gauge: 8 sts x 14 rows=3”

Finished Dimensions: 44” wide x 62” long from front hem to back hem.

Poncho is designed in 3 pieces, the Right side, the Left side, and the Hood, with a simple crocheted tie for neckline. Gloves are each worked in one piece. All edging is accented with Purl stitches, and we call this effect, Popcorn Stitches. The rest of the poncho is done with basic double knit stockinette.

Basic Abbreviations Used:  P=purl    K=knit    aprox=approximately    st(sts)=stitch (stitches)    R=right    L=left

The Popcorn is worked on all sides of each, the R and L side. When the pieces are joined together down front and back of poncho, the Popcorn really stands out.

Popcorn Stitch: Work Purl stitch on every other stitch, on both sides of the loom. One row will start with purl st and the next row will start with knit stitch. Alternate the knit and purl stitches as you go across the loom. Directions for starting each row will be given at beginning of the section.

Left side of poncho: Cast on 58 sts in stockinette. Lay anchor yarn.
Rows 1-14: Work in Popcorn, starting first row with K stitch. Work across loom alternating the K st with the Purl st. Start the next row with P st and alternate the knit and purl across the loom.
Row 15: Start row with P st and continue Popcorn for 8 sts. Work 44 sts in Stockinette St, and last 6 sts in Popcorn to end.
Repeat row 15 until the piece is aprox 26” long, less border, or if counting rows, you will have worked aprox 122 rows. For shorter poncho, work less rows.

Neckline/Shoulder: We are creating the opening for the neck.
Bind off 6 stitches at end of loom, or R side of loom. Start this bind off at last stitch or right edge of knit. Place last bind off loop onto next peg with yarn. This will end the Popcorn on R side of knitted piece. On next row, be sure to lift both loops from the bind off when completing this row.

Work 21 rows on remaining 52 stitches. This is the side of the neckline across shoulder. Now, you want to place the 6 sts back onto the right side of the knitted poncho center. To do this, continue row 21 for additional 6 stitches. Lay anchor yarn over just these 6 new stitches. Complete this row with hook over, but the 6 new stitches will just have one loop. You can hook them over after the next full row. Start the Popcorn on this row for the 6 new stitches.
Continue working the next 122 rows with 8 sts Popcorn, 44 sts Stockinette, 6 sts Popcorn.
Work 14 rows in Popcorn so that finish is same as the beginning.

Right Side Of Poncho: Right side of poncho is knit just like the left side except, work row 15 as, 6 Popcorn stitches, 44 Stockinette stitches and 8 Popcorn stitches. Work the neckline/shoulder from the beginning of the loom, or first 6 sts. Before taking this piece off loom, lay next to Left side to confirm that they are the same length. Adjust if necessary.

Hood: The hood is worked with Popcorn stitch around the face. It will fold back before sewing to poncho. (if desired)
Cast On 32 stitches in Stockinette stitch. Lay anchor yarn.
Work 24 sts in Stockinette, 8 sts in Popcorn across the 32 cast on stitches.
Repeat this row until the piece measures aprox 28” in length.
Bind off of loom and anchor yarn loosely with 2 loop method. (1 thru 1 loops). Set aside for sewing.
Make a drawstring with crochet chain aprox 50”, completed length.

Sewing and Finishing:
The 2 sides of the poncho will be joined so that the neckline is lined up and creates a soft rectangular opening. This is where the hood will be attached. You want to seam the two sides together using matching yarn and the darning needle. You are joining the 6 st edges of the popcorn stitches.
Sew with invisible stitch. Join one seam (back of poncho) from bottom hem to neckline opening (back of neckline). When sewing the front of poncho, leave the top 5-6” open at neckline, and sew from this point to hem. Do some reinforcement stitches at neckline opening.
Your poncho is now in one piece-just need to add the hood. Fold the hood over so that the popcorn edges are together. Seam the back of hood from top to bottom edge. Slip the hood on your head to determine how deep you want it to be as this will help you decide if folding the popcorn edge over is desirable.
The hood is sewn to the poncho by matching the center of hood to center of back at back seam. Match the front edges of the hood to the front top edge of the neckline. Tack these points, and a few others in between. This will keep the hood lined up with the poncho for complete sewing. Sew securely all around the neck opening, so that the hood is now part of the poncho.  Do this using invisible stitch.
Attaching the Crochet Tie: Lay the crochet tie around neckline seam so that the ends are equal length at front of hood. There should be about 12” of crochet tie at each side of hood. Stitch the tie to the neckline seam with matching yarn and secure at each outer front edge of hood.
(Optional)  You may want to knot the ends of tie or sew on a small pompom or bead.  Your poncho is ready to wear.

Matching Fingerless Gloves: These are perfect to add some warmth to the arms without the bulk of full gloves. You can make them as long as desired. Measure from base of fingers to about 3” from elbow. This will bring them right up under the edge of poncho. Our sample makes a glove about 10” around the arm and 12” long. You can adjust these measurements as desired.
Cast on 24 stitches. Work 8 rows in popcorn stitch.
Row 9-54: Work in Stockinette.
Bind off loosely with basic bind off (1 loop over 1).
Sew the seam to close in glove. Start at bind off edge, opposite end from popcorn, and sew aprox 1”. Leave thumb opening 1-1/2”. Sew from thumb opening to top of glove at popcorn edge. Knot securely. Make a 2nd glove.

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6 Comments

  • I am using Redheadt worsted weight yarn this has turned out 15 inches widi am trying to block it to 8 any suggestions

  • That comment was for Stitchology above

  • Love the outfit. I hope one day I can make it. I’m just learning. But will give it a try.

  • Beginner beginner! Can any knit stitch be used for the stockinette stitch? Is there any video to go by for this project available for purchase or viewing? I love this poncho!

    Jill

  • The knit stitch for double knitting stockinette is one. We have some videos in the video section of the website that shows the stockinette in double knit.

  • I want to make the poncho but I only have the AIO, I know that I’ll get a smaller poncho, but I wonder if that could work if I set the wooden spacer in the second configuration.

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Jan 16, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Tighten The Cast On?

 

 

 

 

 

While there are lots of ways to cast on a project, the cast on we learn first is the E-wrap Cast On.  But most people do not like to use it because it is also the loosest cast on.  Which, of course, leads to questions…  Why is my cast on edge so loose?  How can I make it tighter?

Most will answer by saying “use a different cast on”.  There really is a cast on for every type of project.  And we all have our favorite cast on.  But most of those do have have enough stretch for some projects.

I want a stretchy cast on but the e-wrap cast on is still too loose making the edge messy!   Not a question but is still a cry for help.  Let’s get going on how to work a not-so-messy-tight-and-tidy e-wrap cast on!

How do I work an e-wrap cast on?

If you think that we are learning a new cast on, then you might be a bit disappointed.  You will not be disappointed in the outcome of this e-wrap cast on when finished though.

While most already know how to work an e-wrap cast on, there are some that need to make a small adjustment in order to get a cleaner finish.  And that small adjustment is how you use the slip knot to start.

If you are new to loom knitting, then here is how to work an e-wrap cast on.

First, make a slip knot.  But do not put it on the first or last peg depending on if you are working a flat panel or in the round.  You will want to use an anchor peg.  If your loom doesn’t have an separate anchor peg, then you will need to use an adjacent peg to put the slip knot on.  Then you will take it off after you get going on your project.  Just be sure to not use it as as a loop on the cast on.

Why can I not use the slip knot as the first loop?

Besides not having a knot in your work, you will not be able to completely finish tightening up the cast on if you use the slip knot as the first loop.

Flat Panel

If working a flat panel, most patterns are written so that the first row is worked from right to left.  That means that the cast on must be worked from left to right.

 

This is my Peg 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will be the last peg for my flat panel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have more pegs than being used, place the slip knot next to the last peg so you are starting your cast on on the last peg of row 1.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are using all the pegs on a round loom, then you will need to actually place the slip knot on the first peg.  Then start working the cast on to the right back around ending on the first peg.

In The Round

 

 

For hats and other projects worked in the round, place the slip knot on the last peg and then work the cast on from the first peg around from right to left.

 

 

 

 

 

How do you work the e-wrap cast on after the slip knot is placed?

 

 

Wrap each peg by bringing the working yarn around the back of the peg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to the front and around to the back again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then go the back of the next peg and wrap it in the same manner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue wrapping all the pegs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pegs look like this when the cast on is finished.

 

 

 

And how the cast on looks from the top of the pegs.

 

 

Do I need to work the 1st row on a flat panel from right to left?  Or work from right to left when working in the round?  Why can I not go in the other direction?

Generally speaking, yes.  While most of use are more comfortable working only one direction, patterns are written this way for a good reason.  Consistency is one.  Also certain stitches like cables are written this way so the stitches can be worked correctly.

A lot of patterns can be worked either way.  But remember when you want to say it’s easier working in a certain direction:  when working a flat panel, you must work in both directions.  That cannot be avoided.

Therefore the sooner you start being consistent with working row 1 from right to left and always working in the round from right to left, the easier it will be to follow patterns that require it.

Do you work a row of stitches before starting row 1?

The e-wrap cast on is just that.  Every peg is wrapped once.  Once the number of pegs are wrapped, the cast on is complete, and row 1 is ready to be worked.

The cast on is NOT considered the first row.  It’s more like the foundation to get started.

How do I tighten the cast on so it’s not messy and loose?

While you can tighten the cast on while it’s still on the loom, I wait until it’s off the loom before starting.

Now is when the magic happens.

 

On a flat panel, start on the end opposite from the tail.   I hold my panel with the tail on the left side and work from the right to the left.

 

 

 

 

 

When working in the round, find the last stitch next to the tail which was the last stitch in each round.  Then you will work from the left to the right around the piece to the tail.

 

 

 

 

 

I will continue to demonstrate on a flat panel.

 

 

 

Find the first loop and with your fingers or loom pick,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gently pull it snug from the edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then find the next loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and gently pull it snug.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue with each stitch until you get to the tail.  With each stitch, the loop you are pulling will get bigger.

 

 

Then when the tail is reached, the loop itself will disappear as it’s pulled snugly.  This is why the slip knot is not used as a cast on loop.  You will not be able to tighten up that last loop with the tail if you used a slip knot.

 

 

 

 

The cast on will then be tidier but still stretchy.

 

 

 

I preferred the yarn over (double e-wrap) cast on for the longest time when I needed a cast on that is stretchy.  But now I prefer to tighten the e-wrap cast on instead.  It gives you more control over how tight you make the cast on edge but still has stretch.

I hope this helps so that everyone has a nice, tight, and tidy e-wrap cast on!  Happy loom knitting!

2 Comments

  • Thank you for the very informative article. I am going make a small swatch and try this technique.

  • Wow, this is a great tip! I prefer double e wrapping each peg as my cast on because it is neater, but I am going to try this on my next project!

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Jan 8, 2017

Snowman Slipper Socks (for 18” dolls)

Whimsical Loom Knits – January 2017   Designed by Jenny Stark

The air is super frosty in this part of the world.  Surprise your favorite doll collector with some whimsical snowman slipper socks to keep their dolly’s toes warm and cozy.

Knitting Loom: KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Small amounts of worsted weight yarn in two different colors.  Samples include Red Heart Super Saver in Artists Print (CC) and Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice in White (MC).

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, needle and thread (for embellishments).

Embellishments: 4 black 7mm buttons, 2 orange 7mm buttons, small amount of black yarn for stitching mouths.

Gauge: 11 stitches & 18 rows = 2″ in stockinette stitch.

Finished Size: Fits 18″ dolls.

Special Techniques:

Wrap & Turn (W&T):  Lift stitch(es) on peg.  Wrap working yarn around the peg.  Replace held stitch(es) on to peg above the wrap just created.  Continue on as directed in the pattern.

Instructions

Using CC, Cast on 20 stitches. Join to work in the round.

Cuff: Rounds 1-4:  K2, P2 to end of round.  Cut CC.

Leg: With White (MC),  knit 4 rounds.

Short row shaping: Continue working with White (MC).

Knit pegs 1-9.  W&T on 10.

Knit pegs 9-2.  W&T on 1.

Knit pegs 2-8.  W&T on 9.

Knit pegs 8-3.  W&T on 2.

Knit pegs 3-7.  W&T on 8.

Knit pegs 7-4.  W&T on 3.

Knit pegs 4-8.  W&T on 9.

Knit pegs 8-3.  W&T on 2.

Knit pegs 3-9.  W&T on 10.

Knit pegs 9-2.  W&T on 1.

Knit pegs 2–20.

Knit pegs 1-20.

Foot: Continuing with White (MC), knit 14 more rounds.

Remove from the loom using the gathered removal method.

Weave in all ends.

Finishing: Create ‘eyes’ by stitching two black buttons on each slipper sock.

Make a ‘carrot nose’ by stitching an orange button on each slipper sock.

Create a ‘mouth’ on each slipper sock using the black yarn.

Weave in any remaining threads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wishing you much luck and happiness in 2017!

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2 Comments

  • Those are so cute. Got to make some

  • These are so cute. My granddaughter just got an American Doll for Christmas, she is also learning to loom. We are going to have some fun making these.

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Jan 2, 2017

Stitchology 28: Large Herringbone

**Pattern updated Jan 9, 2017 (specifically Row 5).

The stitch we’ll be working up this month is wonderful for its simple symmetry and lines.  The bold repeating herringbone pattern makes this a wonderful stitch for deep texture and coziness! Worked in this winter white, it makes me think of snow clad forest branches. I can visualize this being used for hats, sweaters, scarves, socks, you name it!  This would also work beautifully as a companion to the smaller herringbone published in the very first Stitchology column as interesting play of texture in any project.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here and here.

Large Herringbone Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight Wool (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in mochi)  

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter & blocking pins/pad)

Pattern Notes:

To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 16 sts—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations
approx: approximately
sts: stitches
rep: repeat
CO: cast on
k:  knit
p: purl
wy: working yarn
BO: bind off

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Repeating Pattern Rows

Row 1:  [k2, p2] rep twice, k1, p2, k2, p2, k1.

Row 2:  p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1.

Row 3: k1, p1, k2, p5, p2, k2, p1.

Row 4: k2, p2, k2, p1, k1, p1. k2, p2, k3.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 37 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Row 1:  p37.

Row 2:  k37.

Row 3:  p37.

Row 4:  k37.

Main Pattern Rows

Row 5: p2, [k2, p2] twice, k1, p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1, [p2, k2] twice, p2.

Row 6: k3, *p2, k2, p2, k3, p2, k2, p2, k1  rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 7: p2, *k1, p1, k2, p2, k5, p2, k2, p1, rep from * to last 3 sts, k1, p2.

Row 8: *k5, p2, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2, p2,  rep from * to last 5 sts, k5.

Rows 9-56:  rep Rows 5-8.

Rows 57-59: rep Rows 5-7.

Finishing Rows

Row 60:  k37.

Row 61:  p37.

Row 62:  k37.

Row 63: p37.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

16 Comments

  • Looking at some of the past stitches in this series, I can see these knitting up as a wonderful sampler afghan. I am going to get started, so I can have a lovely afghan at the end of the year! This one looks great, and I can see myself making scarves, hats, shawls, and more out of it! Thank you!

  • Oh, that’s wonderful, Ruthie! Thank you so much for commenting and for taking part. I can’t wait to see your afghan! :D

  • Do you mean repeat twice or do the stitch pattern one more time? Just repeat?.Not repeat twice.
    I am confused

  • Hi, Ginny :)

    When you see sts placed inside brackets and then a number after…like twice…then it means to work those sts inside the brackets a total of 2 times. It might say after the brackets: 6 times, etc, but in this case it is only twice.

    Once those sts are worked the number of times listed, then you proceed to the next sts in the line of instructions for that row. Does that make better sense? :)

    Bethany~

  • Yes thanks

  • Row5 Main pattern row indicates 35 stitches
    On the break down after the k3 is there a P2 K2 (stitch row 21,22,23,24) then P2, K1.

  • Yes, you are correct, Ginny. :) The pattern has been corrected. Thank you…good eye!

  • Hi,when knitting flat,do I knit from right to left then left to right on the pattern,(row one right to left ,row two from left to right the third right to left and so on?thanks,jacki.

  • Hello Jacki :)

    The instructions say: Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 38 pegs.

    The next row would be your beginning row, or Row 1, and would be knit in the opposite direction of the cast on…so right to left. And yes, you would alternate rows when working a flat panel…so for Row 2, you would turn and knit back across the row from left to right, and so on. :)

  • I used Red Heart yarn for this and it turned out 15 inches wide
    I have tried to block it
    To no avail
    How can I correct this.
    What did i do wrong
    I would try again but am afraid of the same poor result
    HELP
    PLEASE

  • Hi Ginny :)

    Well, first of all, in order to properly block something, you need to use yarns with a high natural fiber content. My own squares are knit with a wool or wool blend. Think of it like your own hair: you can get your hair to curl or straighten by using water or heat. This is the way blocking works for knitting. Acrylic just doesn’t have the same properties (it is essentially a plastic) to be able to re-mold itself into new shapes like natural hair/fiber. ;)

    But, even if you could block the square, 15″ probably couldn’t be blocked to 8″. Let’s look at some more ideas. .

    We need to look at what knit stitch you are using. I pretty much always use a U-stitch, which is in between the gauge of a regular knit stitch and a flat knit stitch. If you try to e-wrap, the stitches will come out way too loose.

    If you are using a U-stitch and are still getting a square that is too large, then either you need to knit with a snugger tension, or you will need to adjust the pattern to work with your own gauge. You can decrease the number of pattern repeat stitches that are in between the garter borders, based on the size you have ended up with, to equal something closer to the 8″.

    Also, another trick that I always do is to “snap” my stitches into place by pulling the knitting from top to bottom, vertically. When we work our stitches on the loom, they are at their most stretched out point. It helps to put them into their proper shape by giving them a gentle tug. ;)

  • Thank you
    I was wondering what is the loosest to the tightest knit stitch on the loom
    E wrap
    regular knit
    U wrap
    Flat knit

  • Yes, you have that correct. :) Here is a tutorial and comparison for you to refer to as well:
    http://blog.knittingboard.com/archives/2543

  • Thanks a million

  • If I’m using 96 pegs, how do I continue the pattern after 37?

  • Hi Shirley :)

    Well, here is what the pattern says in the Notes:

    “For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows (increasing as necessary), then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch border for the length and width required. Complete by adding the same number of extra Finishing Rows at the end that were added at the beginning.”

    So, in this case, you might not actually use the 37 count. This is just what I used for the square that includes border pegs and 2 repeats of the 16 stitch pattern. For 96 pegs, if you don’t have any border stitches, you could repeat the 16 pattern stitches 6 times. But if you want to fit in some border stitches, you could take out 1 or 2 of those 6 repeats to create a nice border on each side.

    If, on the other hand, you are wanting to use this stitch in the round, then you would simply work the 16 pattern stitches 6 times, and continue onto the following rows of the pattern, no border required.

    Does that make sense? :)
    Bethany~

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Dec 31, 2016

Sugar & Spice Scarf

Design by Bethany A Dailey

This spunky scarf is worked in a pattern of threes—three stitch styles and three colors all make for a delightful combination of fun textures and style!  Worked in double knit on the Zippy, this is a quick and satisfying project to whip up on your looms.

Knitting Loom: Zippy Master Set: 4 Zippy Looms, connected to use as a knitting board with 2 straight connectors and 2 regular connectors, 14 pegs used.

Yarn: Approximately 185 yards of super bulky #6 weight yarn. Sample used Red Heart Grande Yarn (MC: 2 skeins in Oatmeal, CC1: 1 skein in Orchid, CC2: 1 skein in Current, 46 yds/42 m per skein, 78% acrylic, 22% wool.)

Notions: knitting tool, 6.5 mm crochet hook (for help with possible missed stitches, etc), stitch markers, scissors, yarn needle, row counter.

Skills Needed: Double Knit Stockinette, Purl, Half Hitch CO.

Abbreviations:

MC: main color
CC1: contrast color 1
CC2: contrast color 2
CO: cast on
K: knit (in this case, all knits are worked as double knit stockinette)
P: purl stitch
St(s): stitches
KO: knit off
DKS: double knit stockinette
HHCO: half hitch cast on

 

Pattern Notes:
This pattern uses 1 strand of yarn held throughout.

This design is written with an extra long length for wrapping around the neck twice.  If a shorter length is desired, work only 2 repeats of the 4-color block pattern, rather than 3 repeats.

Half Hitch CO tutorial (This is for single knitting, but will explain the concept of the HHCO.)

Stockinette CO with a waste yarn tutorial

Double Knit Stockinette tutorial

 

Instructions

First Corner:

Connect Zippy looms to work in double knit with 14 peg pairs (2 sets of 2 looms connect to each other, then connect parallel to each other with the straight connectors).

Using CC 1, CO to 6 pegs (3 peg pairs) using Stocking CO with a waste yarn, centering them on the 14 pegs used on the loom.

Work 3 rows DKS.

At the end of the 3rd row, add 2 HHCO loops onto the next peg pair.

Wrap half of the next row of DKS.  At the turning peg of the 4th row, add 2 HHCO loops onto the next peg pair. Continue to wrap and KO the rest of the 4th row.

Work 1 more row of DKS on the 5 peg pairs.

At the end of the 5th row, add 2 HHCO loops onto the next peg pair.

Wrap half of the next row of DKS.  At the turning peg of the 6th row, add 2 HHCO loops onto the next peg pair. All 14 pegs (7 peg pairs) should now be filled. Continue to wrap and KO the rest of the 6th row.

Work 2 more rows of DKS on the 7 peg pairs.

Main Body:

Rows 1-6:  Using MC, rep the following 2 row pattern:

Row A:  P all 14 pegs (7 peg pairs) working in the same wrapping pattern as DKS.

Row B: DKS all.

Rows 7-12:  Using CC2, DKS all.

Rows 13-18: Using MC, p all 14 pegs (7 peg pairs) working in the same wrapping pattern as DKS.

Rows 19-24:  Using CC1, DKS all.

Repeat Rows 1-24 three more times for a total of 4 repeats of the 4 color blocks.  **See pattern notes if a shorter scarf is desired.

Repeat Rows 1-6.

Last Corner:

Using CC2, work 3 rows DKS.

Move the loops from the 2 outside peg pairs (4 pegs total) one peg pair inward toward the center of the loom.  Knit these 2 loops as one when working the next row.

Work 2 rows DKS on remaining 5 peg pairs (10 pegs total).

Again move the loops from the 2 outside peg pairs (4 pegs total) one peg pair inward toward the center of the loom.  Knit these 2 loops as one when working the next row.

Work 3 rows DKS on remaining 3 peg pairs (6 pegs total).

Working with just one of the loom rails, move the 3 loops from the peg pairs across to the 2nd half of the peg pairs on the other loom rail. There will now be 3 pegs with 2 loops each on just one side of the loom.  Set aside.

Finishing:

Holding one strand each of the 3 yarn colors (or the colors desired for braids), wrap them around the perimeter of the loom once and cut.  Pull these 3 strands through the loops of the last remaining loops in line on the loom.  Group them by twos and braid the yarn strands.  Make an overhand knot at the length desired.  Repeat this procedure for the CO loops with the waste yarn at the other point of the scarf.

The ends of the braids can be left with a length of tails for a tassel, or as the sample shows, pom poms can be sewn in place for extra embellishment.

Weave in all ends loosely, invisibly sewing through existing plies and stretching during weaving to help keep those large strands from unraveling.

 

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Dec 19, 2016

Loom FAQs: Why Are There No Loom Knit Magazines? Or… The DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia

 

 

 

 

 

Over and over I keep seeing the same question.  Why are there not any magazines for loom knitting?  Well that is a rather simple question to answer.  Because there is not enough interest.  Then that answer leads to But loom knitting is so popular right now!  Yes.  But not popular enough.

Years ago, I worked in the craft publishing industry.  And learned quite a lot about what it takes to publish books, magazines, and pamphlets.  Publishing companies do not want to invest in crafts that are not booming.  And yes.  There is a difference between popular and booming.

Just take a look at the number of published books on loom knitting.  In the scheme of things, there are very few compared to needle knit and crochet.  I own almost all of the published book on loom knitting.  I have a love of books and a “need” to own them.  There is just something about the feel and smell of a book…

But even with all the books we do have, some have different information than others.  Most only contain what information and instruction are needed for the projects in that particular book.  None of them contain everything.  Which leads me to the actual topic for today…  DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia.  What??  Yes!  Let’s just make our own encyclopedia of loom knitting.

Years ago, I started collecting all info regarding loom knitting.  I printed off EVERYTHING.  But then I needed a way to store and organize it.  And everything that I have learned about this I will share with you today.

Where do I find information for my DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia?

Well for starters, the Knitting Board blog is a great place to start for techniques, stitch patterns, projects, and more.  This blog is like a virtual magazine.  Each month there are articles, patterns, stitch patterns, etc., and it’s all free!  Lots of information just waiting to be printed off.

There are also lots of other websites that contain loom knitting information.  And then there are those books I mentioned.

But what about copyright?  How does that affect my DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia?

Following copyright laws is very important.  You can learn more about copyright in  Loom FAQs:  What is Copyright? Trademark?  But the one thing that I will reiterate here is the following.

A person can make a copy off of the internet for their own personal use.  Like for their personal DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia.

Also a person can make a copy of any book that they OWN for their own personal use.  No, you cannot make a copy of a loom knitting book at the library.  It is not considered a reference book so it is not allowed under copyright law.  But if you already own the book, you can make copies of pages that you need to put into your diy encyclopedia.  This way you can get all the instructions from those books all in one place.

What do I need then?

First of all, you will need a home printer/copier with lots of ink and printer paper.  Without that, you cannot even get started.  Got those?  Great!  Let’s continue…

3 Ring Binder

 

 

You will also need a 3 ring binder.  One large one if you want to put everything in one binder.  Or you can get the thinner ones if you want to divide up the information in separate “volumes”.  This option is great for people who like to be fancy by having a multi-volume encyclopedia.  Or for those that  just do not want to lug out a huge, heavy binder every time they want to look something up because they are not weight lifters.  Like me…

 

 

 

Plastic Sleeves

 

You will also want to invest in some plastic sleeves.  While I say “invest”, they really are not that expensive.  You can buy a package of 25 for approximately $5.  Or if you are like me and want put all the info you can find into a multi-volume set, packages of 200 plastic sleeves are about $20.  You can find them at office supply stores and even in the office supply aisle at your local discount store where you buy your 3 ring binders.

While you can just use a 3 hole punch on the paper, the pages will not last as long and sometimes even gets the holes over the printed part causing you to lose information.

 

 

Dividers

 

While you can buy dividers that that have the tabs already on them, I know from experience if you are using the plastic sleeves that the tabs will not stick out far enough on most of the 3 ring binder tab dividers.

There are tab dividers now that are plastic sleeve dividers.  This are wide enough but do cost just a bit more.

If you can find the tabs themselves that are not on dividers, then you can make your own with the plastic sleeves.

 

 

 

How do I assemble it?

First you need to print off the pages you want off the internet and copy the pages you need from the books that you own.

You will need to have some sort of idea of how you want to divide things up.  Such as a small binder for techniques with dividers for cast ons, bind offs, knit and purl stitch instruction, etc.

Maybe another small binder (unless you are putting everything into a big binder) for stitch patterns because you have printed off every one of Bethany Dailey’s Stitchology columns and want to have it in book form.

Or Jenny Stark’s Whimsical Loom Knits to go into the pattern section of your DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia with the other patterns you have printed off the KB Blog.

Don’t forget Loom FAQs!  Although you might want to sort those out into the different categories.

Can I print front and back of the paper?

While you can print on both sides of the paper in order to use less paper, I find that the ink does bleed through unless you have purchased higher quality printer paper.  I usually just use the paper I have and print on 1 side.  But that is entirely up to you.

Now what?

Slide the printed pages into the plastic sleeves.  If printing only on one side of the page, put 2 consecutive pages back to back before sliding them into the sleeve.

Then put them in the binder.  Simple as that!

If you bought the binders that have the sleeves on the front and side, you can then print off a “cover” and “spine” as well.

But most importantly, make it your own.  Get creative with your DIY Loom Knit Encyclopedia!    Put everything in it or just the things that are important to you.

Don’t forget!

Just remember that you cannot sell it or give it away.  It is for your own personal use only.

But what if I want to make one as a gift?

You can buy the items needed and assemble it but leave it empty of printed material to give as a gift.  But the recipient will need to print off their own pages to put into it.  Along with avoiding copyright violations, this way they can make it their own and in a way that is most helpful for them.

I hope this helps you create something that is useful to you and can be added to as more information becomes available.  Keep on loom knitting!

 

1 Comment

  • This is a fabulous idea! I love it, and will try to start compiling my own soon!

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Dec 15, 2016

Messy Bun Beanie

messy-bun-hat-bill

You have probably seen them all around social media, messy hair is in this season, as long as you sport a beanie, you will be in fashion. Now, this is for a messy bun as the opening is big enough to allow the messy bun to go through. 

This beanie has the option of adding a small bill.

LOOM:  Hat Loom set at large gauge with 42 pegs.
YARN:  Approx 80  yds of super bulky weight wool yarn.  Malabrigo Rasta in Purple Mystery (100% merino wool, 90 yds per skein).
NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle.
GAUGE: 4.5 sts and 8 rows  = 2 inches in stockinette.
SIZE:  Fits adult (up to 21″ head circumference).

 

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately
k=knit stitch (note: the true knit stitch is recommended for this project with this type of yarn)
p=purl stitch
CO=Cast on
st(s)=stitch(es)
rnd(s)=round(s)
Rem=remain

messy-bun-hat-no-bill

BEANIE INSTRUCTIONS

Assemble Hat Loom at large gauge with 42 pegs (largest size).

Cast on 42 sts, prepare to work in the rnd.

Rnd 1, 3, 5, 7, 9: k to end of rnd. (If you worked a Bill, on the first round, treat all loops on the pegs as one loop).

Rnd 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: p to end of rnd.

Rnd 11-14: p to end of rnd.

Rnd 15-19: k to end of rnd.

Rep Rnds 11-19: 2 more times

Next 3 rnds: k to end of rnd (or until item measures 7.5 inches from CO edge).

Bind off using a crochet hook as follows: transfer all the stitches to a piece of scrap yarn. Insert crochet hook on last stitch (where the working yarn is located). Pass the crochet hook through the next stitch (two stitches are on the hook), hook the working yarn and pass it through both stitches. *Insert the crochet hook through the next two stitches, hook the working and pass it through both stitches. Rep from * all the way to the end, until all stitches have been crochet. On the last stitch, cut the working yarn leaving a 6-inch yarn tail. Pull the yarn tail through the last stitch. Weave ends in. Steam block to soften the wool.

Video on this can be found at this link: https://youtu.be/KYZJ6gkuaVU?list=PL2-mSMyRmhzWmYWDaCNjuwaN3XGWp6E4B

BILL INSTRUCTIONS

CO 20 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1 (from right to left): k to end of row.

Row 2: Sl1, p to last st, k1.

Row 3: Decrease row as follows: Move loop from the second peg over to the third peg. Move loop from first peg to empty peg 2. At the other end of the loom, move the loop from the second to last peg to the third to last peg. Move the stitch on the last peg, to the second to last peg (it was emptied when you moved the stitch to the neighbor peg to the right). (18 sts rem).

Sl1, k to end of row.

Rep Rows 2 and 3: until 12 sts remain on the loom.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave ends in. Do not block. The stiffness of the yarn will help the Bill stay up.

Place the CO edge stitches back on the loom (20 sts), then follow Beanie Instructions.

Have questions or comments, please feel free to contact Isela Phelps by leaving a comment below. 

 

 

2 Comments

  • Is there a way to convert this to the AIO loom since I don’t have the hat loom?

  • Hi, you would have to use every other peg on the AIO. Follow the pattern as instructed with the weight yarn as instructed, when you cast on, cast on every other peg.

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Dec 12, 2016

Miniature Christmas Sock

Whimsical Loom Knits – December 2016

Designed by Jenny Stark

We Need a Little Christmas by Johnny Mathis has been on my mind today.  I hope this little project will bring a little holiday happiness to you.  Knit a little Christmas spirit with this cheery little sock and place it in your tree.  Or, fill it with a little present and gift a little Christmas to someone dear to you.

img_3686

Knitting Loom: KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn: Small amounts of worsted weight yarn in holiday colors.  Sample includes Vanna’s Choice in Cranberry, White, and Olive.

Notions: knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle.

Gauge: Not critical for this project.

Finished Size: Approximately 2.5″ wide by 4.5″ long

 

Special Techniques:

Wrap & Turn (W&T):  Lift stitch(es) on peg.  Wrap working yarn around the peg.  Replace held stitch(es) on to peg above the wrap just created.  Continue on as directed in the pattern.

Basic Graft Cast Off:  See this tutorial.

Instructions

Using Cranberry, Cast on 24 pegs.

Cuff:

Rounds 1-6:  K2, P2 to end of round.

Leg:

Drop Cranberry to center of loom.  With White,  knit 4 rounds.

Drop White to center of loom.  With Olive, knit 6 rounds.

Drop Olive to center of loom.  Pick up Cranberry.  Knit 1 round.

Short row shaping:

Continue working with Cranberry.

Knit pegs 1-11.  W&T on 12.

Knit pegs 11-2.  W&T on 1.

Knit pegs 2-10.  W&T on 11.

Knit pegs 10-3.  W&T on 2.

Knit pegs 3-9.  W&T on 10.

Knit pegs 9-4.  W&T on 3.

Knit pegs 4-8.  W&T on 9.

Knit pegs 8-5.  W&T on 4.

Knit pegs 5-9.  W&T on 10.

Knit pegs 9-4.  W&T on 3.

Knit pegs 4-1o.  W&T on 11.

Knit pegs 10-3.  W&T on 2.

Knit pegs 3-11.  W&T on 12.

Knit pegs 11–2.  W&T on 1.

Knit pegs 2–24.

Foot:

Continuing with Cranberry, knit 4 more rounds.

Drop Cranberry to center of loom.  With White, knit 4 rounds.

Cut White, leaving a long enough tail for weaving in.  With Olive, knit 6 rounds.

Cut Olive, leaving a long enough tail for weaving in.

With Cranberry, knit 1 round.

Repeat short row shaping section.

Knit 1 more round with Cranberry.

Remove from the loom using the basic graft cast off.

eta – Weave in all ends.  Add an ornament hanger, if desired.

img_3687

Wishing you much joy and happiness this Holiday Season!

 

 

4 Comments

  • This is truly adorable, Jenny! :D Puts me in a very festive mood!

  • how do you unknit a row of stitches?

  • Thank you Bethany :)

  • Hi Maureen,

    I found a video tutorial that should be helpful to you. You can find it here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ng3_yW33m1c

    I hope that helps. Have a great weekend!

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Dec 5, 2016

Stitchology 27: Little Pines

little-pines

Last December we learned a stitch using cables that formed a forest of Evergreens.  It seemed fitting to celebrate the entrance the holidays with another iconic wintry designthis time using eyelets to form majestic pine boughs. Even though this stitch is a 16 row repeat, once you get the hang of how the rows flow, they can be worked entirely from memory.

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure. My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square. As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you? You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;) To find all the previous stitches in this column, simply click here.

Little Pines Square

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Berroco Vintage in Clary)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter, and blocking pins)

Pattern Notes

It really helps to use a yarn with a high wool content for thoroughly blocking this square to help open up those eyelets and make the bottom edge straight.

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 18—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows inside the garter stitch edges for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows. The border edges may need to also be increased to coordinate with the number of increased Repeating Pattern Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

*All yarn overs (yo) are completed by laying the working yarn loosely across the front of the peg, not e-wrapping! If you e-wrap, your eyelets will not be visible, unless you untwist the e-wrap before working into the next row. ;)

To work a S2KP (or: s2tog, k1, p2sso), please see the following instructions:

* Keep in mind that these steps are all accomplished on the same three pegs, worked from right to left: 3, 2, 1.

*  The instructions in brackets [ ] are simply to break the meaning of the abbreviations down to the simplest knitting terms, with the instructions on how to work them on the loom listed directly after. 

    • 1. [Slip 2 stitches together as if to knit 2 stitches together]: for this step, move the stitch on peg 1 to peg 2 and carry the yarn behind pegs 1 & 2 to peg 3.
    • 2. [Knit 1]: knit the stitch on peg 3.  *See Note Below.
    • 3. [Pass the 2 slipped stitches one at a time over the stitch just knitted and drop them]: for the this step, move the stitch on peg 3 to peg 2. Lift the 2 loops one at a time over the top loop.  **See Note Below.

*Note: Work Step 1 once the yo peg has been reached while working row.  After Step 1 is worked, move the same number of sts over to fill in the empty peg that equal the number of purls listed before the yo peg in the pattern/chart.   This puts the empty peg for the yo in the correct place for pattern.

**Note: After Step 3 is worked, move the same number of sts over to fill in the empty peg that equal the number of purls listed after the yo peg in the pattern/chart.   This puts the empty peg for the yo in the correct place for pattern.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows

Here are the Repeating Pattern Rows for the stitch itself, based on the chart above:

Row 1: *yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k9, rep from *.

Row 2 and all even Rows: knit all sts.

Row 3: *k1, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k10, rep from *.

Row 5: *k2, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k11, rep from *.

Row 7: *k3, yo, S2KP, yo, k12, rep from *.

Row 9: *k9, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, rep from *.

Row 11: *k10, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k1, rep from *.

Row 13: *k11 yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k2, rep from *.

Row 15: *k12, yo, S2KP, yo, k3, rep from *.

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart. Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing! For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 37 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)  For ease of working the pattern, place a marker on pegs 10, 19, and 28.  These will be your S2KP pegs.

little-pines-frontSet Up Rows

Rows 1-6: Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Row a: p37

Row b:  k37

Main Pattern Rows

Row 7:  p4, k1, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k9, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k1, p4.

Row 8 & all even numbered Rows: k37

Row 9:  p4, k2, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k11, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k2, p4.

Row 11:  p4, k3, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k13, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k3, p4.

Row 13:  p4, k4, yo, S2KP, yo, k15 sts, yo, S2KP, yo, k4, p4.

Row 15:  p4, k10, yo, p3, S2KP, p3, yo, k10, p4.

Row 17:  p4, k11, yo, p2, S2KP, p2, yo, k11, p4.

Row 19:  p4, k12, yo, p1, S2KP, p1, yo, k12, p4.

Row 21:  p4, k13, yo, S2KP, yo, k13, p4.

Rows 23-61: repeat Rows 7-22.

Finishing Rows

Rows 62-67: Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Row a: k37

Row b:  p37

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.  This square was blocked quite thoroughly to really help the eyelets open and the stitches pop.  It was gently washed by hand, left to soak for a while, then the excess water was squeezed out by rolling and pressing the square inside a towel.

Afghan Notes:

Stitchology Squares If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares. We will be sharing at least 24 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket. Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as
necessary:

• Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
• Children: 42″ x 48″
• Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
• Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
• Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a note for Bethany Dailey below in the comments! :)

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4 Comments

  • I just wanted to say thank you for all the work you do with your stitchology monthly column. I haven’t had the time to make them all yet but I appreciate the work you put into them! This one is perfect for the holidays!

  • Oh, thank you so much, Christine! That means a lot! I’m so glad you have been enjoying them. :)

  • I wish you could state what pegs are what in the video. I am blind and when people do videos sometimes blind people watch. It is very hard to figure out what peg you are talking about when you say this peg and point to it.
    I love this stitch and wish II could make it.
    thank You. Judy

  • Hi Judy :)

    This is very interesting and I will try to keep this in mind for the next time I do a video. Since the video is meant to simply be an aid to the written pattern, I hope that if you follow the words written, the technique will make more sense to you. If you have any questions at all in how to work the stitch, please feel free to ask right here! :)

    Bethany~

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Dec 4, 2016

Snow Kisses Shawl

shawl-2

Envelope yourself in a whisper soft shawl this holiday season.

LOOM:  All-n-One Knitting Loom

YARN:  Approx 750 yds of merino wool worsted weight yarn.  Knit Picks Preciosa Tonal in Blue Skyes (3 skeins)  was used in sample.

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool.

GAUGE: 8 sts and 14 rows  = 2 inches in stockinette.

SIZE:  Approx 24” x 52″ (suggest to steam block).

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BBO=Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

p2tog=purl two stitches together

yo=yarn over

rep=repeat

shawl-5

INSTRUCTIONSchart

CO 106 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 (from right to left): k to end of row.

Row 2, 4, 6, 8, 10: p to end of row.

Row 11: k3, *k1, yo, p2tog, k1; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 12: p3, *k1, yo, p2tog, k1; rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Rep Row 11 and Row 12: until item measures approx 50”

Next row: k to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Rep last two rows, 4 more times (total of 8 rows).

BBO.

Steam block or wet block.

shawl-3

Continue reading »

8 Comments

  • This is so lovely, Isela! :) I love the color and the simplicity of the stitch…so elegant.

  • This shawl looks so pretty! I can’t wait to start! Just to verify when I knit the pegs can I ewrap or did you use another knit stitch? Thank you for the pattern and your time.

  • This is a beautiful piece of knitting. Thanks for sharing. Laura

  • The Knit stitches were regular knit stitches, not Ewrap.

  • You are welcome

  • Thank you! :)

  • Does this pattern use one strand or two?

  • June, it uses 1 strand throughout the pattern.

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Nov 28, 2016

Loom Weaving: A Little Handmade Holiday

WovenGiftTagWith the holidays approaching, it’s fun to add a little handmade surprise to your gifts. Today I’ll show you how to make a little weave with a simple snowflake embroidery that can be used as a tag on a gift and later used as a little decoration. The best part of this small project is you can use any extra yarn that you might have left over!

Loom: All-in-One Loom & 20-Peg-Extenders

Yarn: Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton Classic Size 10 in white is used for the warp. Along with a hand-spun Merino wool thick n’ thin in color Antler from AmandaJFrench on Etsy is used for the weave. The embroidery is done with Aunt Lydia’s Crochet Cotton Classic Size 10 in metallic gold.

Notions: tapestry needle

Small Weave Pattern Steps:

Set up your weave as described here. Double knot your warp thread on pin #4 from the bottom left. Warp your loom so that 8 pins are warp across the top and 9 pins are warped on the bottom, which includes your beginning double knot and your ending double knot of the warp thread.

WovenGiftTagStep 1: Take a length of white warp thread, about 8 inches long and plain weave it between the warp threads. Pull so both ends of the thread is even on both sides and the thread is sitting up against your loom pegs. Tie the two ends together in a knot. This is what will be used as your tag string.

Step 2: Using one thread of your thick n’ thin, soumak weave (looping around each warp thread) across the first row.

Tip: Weave your soumak a few inches down your warp threads, then push it up all the way to the top so that it is touching your loom pegs. This will give your hands room to weave.

Step 3: For the second row, weave your thick n’ thin yarn in a plain weave. Continue weaving the plain weave so that you have 15 rows of plain weave.

Step 4: Finish your tiny weave with the last row being soumak (looping around each warp thread) all the way across.

WovenGiftTagStep 5: Secure your yarn ends in the back of the weave.

Step 6: Add the embroidered snowflake (steps below).

Embroidery Steps:

Using your weave as a grid, there are 16 warp threads across the top and 17 weft rows down the side. I have numbered the weft threads and the plain weave weft rows (don’t count the soumak rows) for the embroidery pattern.

WovenGiftTagStep 1: Use your gold thread with your tapestry needle. From behind the weave, bring the gold thread up at plain row #4/ warp #4. Pull it diagonally down to row #12/ warp #13 and bring the gold thread through the front of the weave to the back.

Step 2: Bring the gold behind the weave then up at row #4/ warp #13. Pull it diagonally to down to row #12/warp #4 and pull the gold thread through to the back of the weave.

Step 3: Bring the gold behind the weave then up at row #8/ warp #4. Pull it across row #8 to warp #13 and pull it through the to the back of the weave.

Step 4: Bring the gold thread behind the weave then up between warp #8 & #9/ row #4. Pull the thread down warps #8 & #9 to row #12 and pull it through to the back of the weave.

Step 5: Your snowflake is now complete. Secure your gold thread ends in the back of the weave.

Finishing the Small Weave Steps:

WovenGiftTagStep 1: Cut the bottom warp threads about 5 inches from the bottom of the weave.

Step 2: Gently lift the top warp loops off the pegs.

WovenGiftTagStep 3: Flip your weave over to the back. Taking two of the bottom warp threads, tie them in a double knot together. Continue this until all bottom warp threads are tied off.

Step 4: Secure the warp threads in the back of the weave, then trim the excess.

WovenGiftTagYour small weave gift tag is now complete and ready to personalize your gifts!

Happy Weaving!

Kate from The Weaving Loom (a blog dedicated to helping others learn to weave)

1 Comment

  • I was wondering if anyone has loom pattern for a archers hoodie? I have also seen it called a Katniss “hunger games” hoodie….

    I AM BRAND NEW TO LOOM KNITTING,lol
    However, the hooded pixie cowl pattern in the chunky grey is exactly what I want with the addition of one armed diagonal body ….
    If anyone could help If appreciate, thank you
    Lias / w.lm@yahoo.com

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Nov 21, 2016

Loom FAQs: What is a Lifeline?

Loom FAQs

 

 

 

 

 

I cannot count the number of times I have seen the question asked How do I save my work now that I have made a mistake?  Or the emphatic statement of defeat It is ruined.

And the answer every time is You should have used a lifeline.

Which always leads to more questions…

But what is a lifeline?  How do I use a lifeline?  Do I need to put on in BEFORE I start knitting?  Can I put in AFTER I start?  What do I need to use for a lifeline?

What is a lifeline?

You are sitting there loom knitting one day, and you see a mistake you made several rows back.  OH the HORROR!!!  Then you yell out to your best friend, “Hey, Betty Sue!  My work has a hole!  I’m sinking fast!  Throw me a lifeline!”  That is when Betty Sue looks at you like you have lost your ever loving mind.  Because Betty Sue knows that is not the way a lifeline in knitting works.  And because Betty Sue is a cat…

If that is not how a lifeline works, then what exactly is it?  Well it is a safety line that will help save your work.  It is a piece of yarn that is run through all the stitches to hold them so that your stitches are safe if you need to rip your work back to that point and can be easily put back on the loom.

When do I need a lifeline?

There are different reasons to need a lifeline.  Maybe you are working on a complicated stitch pattern and just want to make sure you have that added protection so you can take the work out if you make a mistake without losing the entire piece.  Or maybe you are wanting to remove your work from the loom because you are decreasing or increasing and are needing to adjust your loom size when using the All-n-One loom or needing to change the loom entirely.

What is the best lifeline to use?

The best lifeline to use is yarn or string that is as follows:

– the same or smaller weight yarn than the yarn you are using so that it will easily go through the stitches

– a contrasting color from your work so it is easy to see

– a fiber type that will easily slide through the stitches like a microfiber or nylon

That last if very important if you are using mohair or another fiber type that easily gets tangled with itself.  Otherwise, if you are using a well spun acrylic, then you can just use acrylic of another color.

Do I need to put it in BEFORE or can I add it LATER?

While it is easier to put in a lifeline before you need it, you can add one later.  Adding it later can be trickier especially if it’s a more complex stitch pattern like cables or lace.  In the case of cables or lace, it is always better to put it in first.

How to place a lifeline BEFORE needing it

When using a lifeline before you need it, you will need to check your work periodically for errors.  If you do not find one, then you will remove the lifeline and place it again where you are.  That way if there is a mistake then you do not need to take it out quite as far.

You will first need to cut your chosen lifeline yarn several inches longer than the work is on the loom.  If you are working in the round, use a piece that will wrap around the loom twice.  If working a flat panel, use a lifeline that is twice the length of the pegs being used.  Or just wrap that yarn around the loom twice no matter if it’s in the round or a flat panel.  If using the afghan loom or another type of figure 8 shape loom, follow the pegs with the yarn around it once then cut it twice as long.

Now you will need to run that lifeline through each stitch on the loom.  There are 2 ways to do this.

You can thread your lifeline on a tapestry needle and run the needle through each stitch.

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or you can just use your loom pick to pull the lifeline through each stitch.  This is my favorite method.

1

 

I like to pull it from the bottom of the loop like a purl but it can be done from the top like a knit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

Be sure and pull the lifeline to the side and back of the peg before going to the next stitch.

 

 

 

 

5

 

Now the lifeline is running through each stitch but behind the peg so it will not interfere with your next row of work.

 

 

 

 

Once you have the lifeline place, you will continue with your work ignoring that extra strand.  When you know you haven’t made a mistake after working several inches of work, remove the lifeline by simply pulling it out.  Then put it back in the stitches that are on the pegs and start again.

How to place a lifeline AFTER needing it

Like I said previously, some stitch patterns are very hard to add afterward.  But if you are just working something simple like stockinette and discover something weird that you have no clue how you did but want to fix, you can add a lifeline into the work a couple of rows below the offending place.  Then you can rip the piece back to that point and easily place the work back on the loom and start again.

You will need to use a tapestry needle for this so thread your chosen lifeline into that needle and let’s get started!

9

 

Find the edge stitch and run the needle though one side a few rows below the mistake.  If it’s worked in the round, start with the stitch that was worked on peg 1 so the starting stitch will still be the same when placed back on the loom.

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

Then run the needle through the next stitch making sure you are staying on the same row.

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

This is what it will look like when all the stitches are on the lifeline.

 

 

 

13

 

Then you pull the previous stitches out until all you have are the stitches on the lifeline ready to be put back on the loom.

 

 

 

I hope this helps save some projects from being completely ripped out due to mistakes being found later.  We have all done it and lost projects that we tried to save.

Lifelines are truly a life saver!  And Betty Sue won’t be giving you that look…

Happy loom knitting!!

1 Comment

  • We’re writing to let you know of a new website that is launching in the coming weeks.

    http://www.k3tog.com

    We’re a knitting community hosting knit-a-longs, tutorials, patterns, and a community space for knitters to become friends and help one another (or vent as the situation calls for)

    We plan on featuring a knitter/designer a month and would love for you to contribute (a pattern, yarn, whatever you’d like!)

    We please ask if you could let your followers know we exist! It would be greatly appreciated.

    Looking forward to having you as a member of the k3tog community

    The k3tog team
    – Kendra and Sarah

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Nov 20, 2016

Morgaine’s Capelet

morgaines-capelet-5

LOOM:  Master Zippy + 2 Zippy Looms

YARN:  Approx 264  yds of super bulky weight wool yarn.  Knit Picks Tuff Puff in Silver yarn was used in sample (100% wool, 44 yds per skein).

NOTIONS:  Knitting tool, tapestry needle, cable needle, crochet hook size M.

OTHER:  Button 1-3/8”  (34mm)

GAUGE: 6 sts and 8 rows  = 4 inches in stockinette

SIZE:  57” x 18”

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately

k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

CO=Cast on

BBO=Basic Bind off

st(s)=stitch(es)

W&T=Wrap and Turn: Take working yarn to the front of the peg and then take the yarn to the back and around the peg, working yarn ends to the front of the peg. wrap-and-turn

 

RT=Take loop off first peg and hold it to the center of the loom on the cable needle. Knit peg 2. Move loop from second peg to peg 1. Place loop from cable needle on peg 2. Knit peg 2.

LT=Skip peg 1 with yarn behind the peg. Knit peg 2. Move loop from peg 2 to cable needle and hold to center of loom. Knit peg 1. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Place loop from cable needle on peg 1.

RTP=Take loop off first peg and hold it to the center of the loom on the cable needle. Knit peg 2. Move loop from second peg to peg 1. Place loop from cable needle on peg 2. Purl peg 2.

LTP=Skip peg 1 with yarn behind the peg. Purl peg 2. Move loop from peg 2 to cable needle and hold to center of loom. Knit peg 1. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Place loop from cable needle on peg 1.

morgaines-capelet-back

Short-Row Wedge Instructions

Row 1: K from peg 26 to peg 15. P pegs 14, 13,  and 12. K pegs 11 and 10. P pegs 9, 8, 7, and 6. Knit peg 5. Purl peg 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 2: P pegs 1, 2, 3 and 4.  LTP on pegs 5 and 6. Purl pegs 7 and 8. RTP on pegs 9 and 10. LTP on pegs 11 and 12. Purl pegs 13 and 14. K pegs 15-23. W&T peg 24.

Row 3: K from peg 23-15. P pegs 14 and 13. K peg 12. P pegs 11 and 10. Knit peg 9. Purl peg 8 and 7. K peg 6. Purl peg 5 and 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 4: P pegs 1-5. LTP on pegs 6 and 7. RTP on peg 8 an d9. P pegs 10 and 11. LTP on pegs 12 and 13. P peg 14. K pegs 15-21. W&T peg 22.

Row 5: K from peg 21-15. P peg 14. K peg 13. P pegs 12-9. K pegs 8 and 7. P pegs 6-4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 6: P pegs 1-6. RT pegs 7 & 8. P pegs 9-12. K peg 13. P peg 14. K pegs 15-19. W&T 20.

Row 7: K pegs 19-15. P peg 14. K peg 13. P pegs 12-9. K pegs 8 and 7. P pegs 6-4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 8: P pegs 1-5. RTP pegs 6 &7. LTP pegs 8 and 9. P pegs 10 & 11. RTP pegs 12 and 13. P peg 14. K pegs 15-17. W&T peg 18.

Row 9: K pegs 17-15. P pegs 14 & 13. K peg 12. P pegs 11 & 10. K peg 9. P pegs 8 & 7. K peg 6. P pegs 5 & 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 10: P pegs 1-4. RTP pegs 5 & 6. P pegs 7 & 8. LTP pegs 9 & 10. RTP pegs 11 & 12. P pegs 13 & 14. K peg 15. W&T peg 16.

Row 11: K peg 15. P pegs 14-12. K pegs 11 & 10. P pegs 9-6. K peg 5. P peg 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 12: P pegs 1-4. K peg 5. P pegs 6-9. LT pegs 10 & 11. P pegs 12-14. K from peg 15-26 (working the wrap and the stitches together).

Regular Segment Instructions

Row 1: K from peg 26 to peg 15. P pegs 14, 13,  and 12. K pegs 11 and 10. P pegs 9, 8, 7, and 6. Knit peg 5. Purl peg 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 2: P pegs 1, 2, 3 and 4.  LTP on pegs 5 and 6. Purl pegs 7 and 8. RTP on pegs 9 and 10. LTP on pegs 11 and 12. Purl pegs 13 and 14. K to end.

Row 3: K from peg 26 to peg 15. P pegs 14 and 13. K peg 12. P pegs 11 and 10. Knit peg 9. Purl peg 8 and 7. K peg 6. Purl peg 5 and 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 4: P pegs 1-5. LTP on pegs 6 and 7. RTP on peg 8 an d9. P pegs 10 and 11. LTP on pegs 12 and 13. P peg 14. K to end.

Row 5:. K from peg 26 to peg 15.  P peg 14. K peg 13. P pegs 12-9. K pegs 8 and 7. P pegs 6-4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 6: P pegs 1-6. RT pegs 7 & 8. P pegs 9-12. K peg 13. P peg 14. K to end.

Row 7: K from peg 26 to peg 15.  P peg 14. K peg 13. P pegs 12-9. K pegs 8 and 7. P pegs 6-4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 8: P pegs 1-5. RTP pegs 6 &7. LTP pegs 8 and 9. P pegs 10 & 11. RTP pegs 12 and 13. P peg 14. K to end.

Row 9: K from peg 26 to peg 15.  P pegs 14 & 13. K peg 12. P pegs 11 & 10. K peg 9. P pegs 8 & 7. K peg 6. P pegs 5 & 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 10: P pegs 1-4. RTP pegs 5 & 6. P pegs 7 & 8. LTP pegs 9 & 10. RTP pegs 11 & 12. P pegs 13 & 14. K to end.

Row 11: K from peg 26 to peg 15. P pegs 14-12. K pegs 11 & 10. P pegs 9-6. K peg 5. P peg 4. K pegs 3-1.

Row 12: P pegs 1-4. K peg 5. P pegs 6-9. LT pegs 10 & 11. P pegs 12-14. K to end.

morgaines-capelet-6

INSTRUCTIONS

Assemble Zippy loom as shown below (total of 6 Zippy and 4 corners, 28 pegs).

zippy-with-6-zippy

 

Cast on 26 sts from right to left (first row will be from left to right), prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1, 3, 5: (from left to right) k to end of row

Row 2, 4, 6: p to end of row

Next 24 rows: Work two Short-Row wedges (Short-Row Wedge Instructions Row 1-12, 2 times).

Next 12 rows: Work one regular segment.

Next 36 rows: Work three Short-Row wedges (Short-Row Wedge Instructions Row 1-12, 3 times).

Next 12 rows: Work one regular segment.

Next 24 rows: Work two Short-Row wedges (Short-Row Wedge Instructions Row 1-12, 2 times).

Next row: k to end.

Next row: to end.

Next row: k to end.

Next row: p to end.

Next row: k to end.

Next row: p to end.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave ends in.

Ribbed Neckline-done in two panels

Panel 1:

Leaving a 30 inch beginning yarn tail, cast on 26 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1-6: *k2, p2; rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave ends in.

Panel 2:

Leaving a 30 inch beginning yarn tail, cast on 24 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row  1-6: *p2, k2; rep from * to end.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave ends in.

Assembly

Lay the capelet flat, right side up.

  1. Starting on the left and using long tail from Panel 1, mattress stitch seam panel 1 to the neckline area of the capelet (as shown below).
  2. Pick up Panel 2 and mattress stitch seam it to the remaining neckline area of the capelet.
  3. Mattress stitch both panels together (at the center where Panel 1 ends and Panel 2 begins).assembly-of-the-capelet
  4. Attach button to left side of capelet, about ½” from the neckline.
  5. On the right side of the capelet, so it aligns with the button, create a button loop by crocheting 6 chains.

Weave all ends in. Steam block.

Continue reading »

2 Comments

  • Could we have a video on how to put this together
    I need a visual on this
    And what is a whip stitch?
    I am new to this

  • You mean a mattress stitch? The mattress stitch is a way to seam panels invisibly.

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