Nov 10, 2017

Blue Reeds Cable Hat

If you love cables in double knit, try this snazzy ‘ready for winter’ hat.  Four cable sections of two cables each. Knit on the ‘Rotating’ Double Knit Loom

Loom: ‘Rotating’ Double Knit Loom, set for double knit.

Stitches:  Rib, Cable Twist

Yarn:  Patons Shetland Chunky, 75% Acrylic, 25% Wool.  Hand wash and lay flat to dry.  Chunky #5 weight.  Color used is 78742 True Peacock.  1 skein or a total of 125 yds.  To make a deeper hat, purchasse 2 skeins of Patons Shetland Chunky.

Medium Blue, 8 yds for PomPoms, or any accent color desired. Sample worked with 3 yarns of similar color and Medium blue.

Notions:  Knit hook, crochet hook, loom double hook (optional), tapestry needle, and stitch markers (4 colored rubber bands work well)

Size:  Hat fits average adult and is 8.5” deep.

Gauge:  4 rounds=1″

 

Abbreviations

St (sts)=stitch (stitches)   aprox=approximately  Rnd(s)=round(s)

Hat Design:

Hat is worked in Rib Stitch. Total of 32 rounds unless deeper hat is desired. Each rib is 2 sts.  Cables consist of 8 stitches or 4 sets of Ribs.  There is a total of 4 Cable sections in hat.

Break down…

  1. Work Twist #1 on all cables and work round.
  2. Rib stitch (3 rounds)
  3. Work Twist #2 on all cables and work round.
  4. Rib Stitch (3 rounds)

Place colored rubber band on each set of 8 sts cables before beginning.  There are 4 of these sections. Sequence:  4st, 8 st cable, 6st, 8 st cable, 4 st, 8 st cable, 6 st, 8 st cable.  Place one rubber band around pegs for each 8 st cable, for markers.

#1 Twist: Each cable design consists of 4 ribs or 8 sts.  Be sure to pick up the correct stitches to keep the ribs consistent.  Twist only the sts on the outer loom.  Place markers or rubber band on each set of 8 sts.

Working pegs 1-4. Lift first 2 sts, 1 and 2 (one rib) and hold on double hook. With another hook, move sts 3 and 4 onto pegs 1 and peg 2.   Now, place st 1 and 2 from double hook onto peg 3 and peg 4.

 

Working pegs 5-8. Do another twist (2 ribs).  Then repeat the process on all sets of 8 sts marked with rubber bands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

#2 Twist:  Start with 2nd rib.  You will be twisting the stitches in the opposite direction.

Working pegs 1-4. Lift the 2 sts on pegs 3 and peg 4 and hold on double hook. Move sts 1 and 2 onto pegs 3 and peg 4.  Now, place sts from double hook onto pegs 1 and 2.

 

 

 

 

 

Working pegs 5-8.  Lift sts 7 and 8 with double hook.  Move sts 5 and 6 to peg 7 and peg 8.  Now place sts from double hook onto pegs 5 and peg 6.

 

 

 

 

 

Repeat this process on all sets of 8 sts marked with rubber bands.

Finished Twist #2

 

Hints:  Work in loose tension especially the row before each twist row.

Work hook over on inner loom first as this loosens tension.  Then, work the hook over on the outer loom.

 

 

 

 

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Cast On all 52 pegs to work in the round in Rib stitch.  Lay anchor yarn and allow ends to dangle below the looms.

Rnds 1-6:  Work in Rib stitch for the brim of hat.

Rnd 7:  Work Twist #1 cable on all 4 cable sections (8 sts each).  Weave the round in rib stitch over all pegs including the cable twists and hook over.

Rnd 8-9-10:  Rib stitch

Rnd 11:  Twist #2 cable on all 4 cable sections.  Work the rnd in rib stitch.

Rnd 12-13-14:  Rib stitch

Rnd 15:  Twist #1 cable on all 4 cable sections.  Work rnd in rib stitch.

Rnd 16-17-18:  Rib stitch

Rnd 19:  Twist #2 cable on all 4 cable sections.  Work rnd in rib stitch.

Rnd 20-21-22:  Rib stitch

Rnd 23:  Twist #1 cable on all 4 cable sections.  Work rnd in rib stitch.

Rnd 24-25-26:  Rib Stitch

Rnd 27:  Twist #2 cable on all 4 cable sections.  Work rnd in rib stitch.

Rnd 28-29-30-31-32:  Rib stitch

Bind Off using Rib Bind Off method: Maintain a yarn tail of aprox 12-14”.  Keep the 2 rib sts together.  Place st 1 on st 2 as if to do decrease.  This needs to be the 2 sts of one rib.  Do this all around the loom on both looms.  You will have every other peg with 2 loops.  Lift bottom over top so that there is just one loop on every other peg. Now, bring the loops from inner loom to outer loom so that there are again 2 loops on every other peg on outer loom.  Use tapestry needle and yarn tail to work around the loom and pick up the loops on the pegs, so that hat is free of the loom, and all loops are secure on the yarn.  Lift hat off loom.  Draw up the top of hat.  Go around the top of hat a 2nd time to secure a snug closure.  Knot the yarn, and weave in ends.

Bind off at Anchor yarn:  With the crochet hook, pick up both loops of one rib at yarn tail.  Pull one thru the other.  Pick up next loop of next rib, and pull one closest to hook thru the other.  Do this loosely around entire brim of hat.  Once complete, knot last loop with yarn tail and weave in ends.  Gently pull out the anchor yarn.

Finish hat with a happy big pompom.  Use some different yarns of shades of blue or peacock blue and maybe some different weights.  Wrap about 40 times around cardboard.  Tie the pompom, cut and trim.  Tie to top of your hat for a fun look.

1 Comment

  • Great supportive photos! Thank you!!!!!

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Nov 6, 2017

Ripples & Ribs Stitch, Stitchology 38

Front Side Ripples & Ribs

 

This is a stitch that is full of loft, texture, and lines, both straight and wavy.  The best  part of this new stitch is that it is completely reversible, with its vertical lines trailing between sections of texture along the front side, and lovely undulating ripples showing horizontally across the back side.  Feel free to use this stitch on anything for which both sides will be featured, such as scarves, blankets, and even reversible hats!

Back Side Ripples & Ribs

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

Abbreviations

K,k: knit

P,p: purl

WY: working yarn

S1, s1: slip one stitch (simply skip this peg while carrying the working yarn behind the peg)

rep: repeat.

 

Chart Key for Repeating Pattern Rows

 Ripples & Ribs Repeating Pattern 

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 6—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

Repeating Pattern for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 6.  Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1: *s1, k1, p1, s1, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 2: *p2, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 3: *s1, p2, rep from * to end.

Row 4: *p1, k3, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Row 5: *s1, k2, rep from * to end.

Row 6:  *k1, p1, k1, p1, k2, rep from * to end.

Row 7: Repeat Row 3.

Row 8: Repeat Row 2.

Row 9: *s1, p1, k1, s1, k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 10: k all sts.

Rep rows 1-10 for desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 6):

Round 1: *s1, k1, p1, s1, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Round 2: *k1, p2, rep from * to end.

Round 3: *s1, p2, rep from * to end.

Round 4: *k1, p1, k3, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 5: *s1, k2, rep from * to end.

Round 6:  *k2, p1, k1, p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Round 7: Repeat Row 3.

Round 8: Repeat Row 2.

Round 9: *s1, p1, k1, s1, k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 10: k all sts.

Rep rounds 1-10 for desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

  • Hi Bethany, I just watched the video on the new Ripples & Ribs stitch and I absolutely love it. Can you tell me what cast on and bind off you used please and thank you.

    Corry

  • I’m so glad you like the stitch, Corry! :) I pretty much always use the Chain Cast On and the Basic Bind Off for all my projects. They look very similar to each other, so provide nicely matched edges.

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Oct 29, 2017

Eydis Scarflette

 As the crisp mornings come to us, the yearning for something soft and snuggly around the neck beckons us to grab our looms and create!

LOOM:  His & Her Sock Looms, Purple, 64 pegs.
YARN:  450 yrds extra fine merino wool fingering weight yarn. Sample used Araucania in Huesco, color 7.
NOTIONS:  tapestry needle, row counter (optional). 3 small buttons, size 7/16” (11mm)
GAUGE:  not relevant for this project.
SIZE:  approx 9” wide x 31” long

ABBREVIATIONS

p=purl

k=knit stitch (may use the u-stitch)

yo=yarn over

k2tog=A right slanting decrease. Takes place over 2 pegs. Number the pegs 1 and 2, from right to left, as follows: Peg 2 -Peg 1.  Remove stitch from peg 1 and hold it. Move stitch from peg 2 to peg 1. Place the loop you are holding back on peg 1. Work both loops together as one loop. *Note: usually, you move this loop over to peg 2 to leave peg 1 empty to create a yarn over.

ssk=A left slanting decrease. Takes place over 2 pegs. Number the pegs 1 and 2, from right to left, as follows: Peg 2 -Peg 1.  Remove stitch from peg 2 and place it on peg 1. Work both loops together as one loop.

 

NOTES

The stitch pattern repeats over 18 stitches (18 pegs). The first 5 pegs and last 5 pegs will always be in garter stitch. The stitch pattern repeats 3 times in the middle 54 pegs. A stitch pattern breakdown is provided at the end of the pattern. Recommend to try out the stitch pattern first before embarking on the project.

Chart provided if you prefer to work from a chart. Chart shows the stitch pattern over 18 pegs and from Row 1-Row 12 of the stitch pattern.

INSTRUCTIONS

Edging

Cast on 64 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

**Row 1: k to end. Note: Row 1 should be in a right to left direction (clockwise around the loom).

Row 2: p to end.

Rep Row 1 and Row 2: 3 more times.

Body

Row 1, 2: k to end of row.

Row 2, 4: p5, k to last 5 sts, p5.

Row 5: k5, *k2tog 3 times, [yo, k1]6x, ssk 3 times, rep from * to last 5 sts, k5

Row 6: p5, k to last 5 sts, p5.

Row 7, 9, 11: k to end of row.

Row 8, 10, 12: p to end of row.*

Rep from ** to ** until item measures 27” inches from cast on edge.

Next row: k to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave all ends in.

Steam block to measurements.

Secure 3 buttons along the side of the scarf. See picture below for placement.

How to do Row 5

To facilitate the stitch pattern breakdown, we will concentrate on the 18 stitches of the lace stitch pattern. The instructions below will start on peg 6 of your loom. On Row 5, the lace row, the first 5 pegs are knitted. The stitch pattern begins on Peg 6—for the purpose of this demonstration, peg 6 will be called peg 1.

  • Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Two loops on peg 2. Knit peg 2. Move loop from peg 2 to peg 1.
  • Move loop from peg 3 to peg 4. Two loops on peg 4. Knit peg 4. Move loop from peg 4 to peg 2.
  • Move loop from peg 5 to peg 6. Two loops on peg 6. Knit peg 6. Move loop from peg 6 to peg 3.
  • Pegs 4, 5, and 6 are empty.
  • Move loop from peg 7 to peg 5.
  • Move loop from peg 8 to peg 7.
  • Ewrap peg 4, knit peg 5.
  • Ewrap peg 6, knit peg 7.
  • Ewrap peg 8, knit peg 9.
  • Remove loop from peg 18 and hold it momentarily. Move loop from peg 17 over to peg 18. Place loop you are holding back on peg 18.
  • Remove loop from peg 16 and hold it momentarily. Move loop from peg 15 over to peg 17. Place loop you are holding on peg 17.
  • Remove loop from peg 14 and hold it momentarily. Move loop from peg 13 over to peg 16. Place loop you are holding on peg 16.
  • Move loop from peg 12 to peg 15.
  • Move loop from peg 11 to peg 13.
  • Move loop from peg 10 to peg 11.
  • Ewrap peg 10, knit peg 11.
  • Ewrap peg 12, knit peg 13.
  • Ewrap peg 14, knit peg 15.
  • Knit to the end of the row (the pegs that have 2 loops on them (pegs 16, 17 and 18) treat both loops as one loop).

Special note: pegs 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 should have been ewrapped (yarn over).

Repeat these instructions every 18 pegs. I recommend getting masking tape and marking your knitting loom (on the masking tape) 1-18, three times—the stitch pattern repeats itself 3 times around the loom. Pegs 1-5 are not part of the stitch pattern, pegs 60-64 are also not part of the stitch pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Oct 23, 2017

Spa Cloth

The holidays are around the corner, this lovely washcloth makes the perfect hostess gift. Knit up a set of three and you have the perfect gift for your next gathering. 

LOOM: KB Premium Round Loom. Any loom from set can be used.

YARN: Sample used Peaches and Cream stripes. (1 ball makes 2)

NOTIONS: Tapestry needle.

GAUGE: 4 stitches and 5 rows to 1″ of pattern, but not relevant for the project.

SIZE: 7” wide x 7″ tall.

ABBREVIATIONS

Ew= ewrap knit stitch
P= purl stitch
K2tog= knit two stitches together
Yo= yarn over (carry yarn in front of peg, do not ewrap)

INSTRUCTIONS

Ewrap cast on 28 pegs counter clockwise, prepare to work in a flat panel. Skip the first stitch in every row to create a nice even edge.

Row 1: purl row

Row 2: ewrap knit row
Repeat rows 1-2 for a total of 8 rows.

Row 9: p3, yo, k2tog (ewk 4, yo, k2tog) p3, ewk1

Row 10: ewrap knit row

Row 11: p3, k2tog, yo (ewk 4, k2tog, yo) p3, ewk1

Row 12: ewrap knit row

Repeat rows 9-12 seven times.

Row 49: purl row

Row 50: ewrap knit row
Repeat rows 49 & 50 for a total of 8 rows.

Bind off using the basic bind off method and weave in yarn ends. Set stitches by gently tugging on the edges.

2 Comments

  • How pretty awesome job on it. Will be making some. Thank you

  • I really like this….. I do think I have found a grand idea for some friends Holiday gifts…. I have two little girls that will love them

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Oct 20, 2017

Alternate Rib Hat

Loom: ‘Rotating’ Double Knit Loom, set up for double knitting.

Yarn:  Knit Picks Preciosa Tonal, 100% Merino Wool, worsted weight, 1skein.  Color ‘Canary’ in sample.

Stitches: Rib, Alternate Rib

Notions:  Knit hook, Crochet hook, one stitch marker (optional)

 Size:  Average Adult

Pattern notes:  Hat brim is knit in the rib stitch. The rest of the hat is knit in the rib and alternating rib stitch. Work by alternating these 2 stitches, round 1 and round 2 until hat length complete.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Place the stitch marker on beginning peg, if desired, or use arrow. Cast On in stockinette stitch.  Lay anchor yarn around stitches between the looms.

Rounds 1-8:  Work rib stitch until end of round.

Round 9: Work alternate rib, until end of round.

Round 10:  Work rib stitch until end of round.

Repeat rounds 9 and 10 until you have a total length of approximately

8-8.5” from brim edge.  Complete the knitting with a row of rib stitch.

See photos below for weaving patterns for the Rib and Alternate Rib Stitch. The blue yarn show the ribbing, and yellow yarn shows the alternate rib.

 

             RIB STITCH

Beginning of round one

End of round one

End of round two

              ALTERNATE RIB

Beginning of the round one

End of round one

Once the knit is desired length, you are ready to bind off.  Move loops from inner loom to outer loom so that each peg on outer loom has 2 loops, and the inner loom is empty, hook over, bottom loop over top.  Now, one loop remains on each peg on outer loom.

Cut the working yarn coming from the project, leaving about 16-20 inches of yarn to use for the gathering process.

Thread the yarn tail through the eye of a tapestry needle. Pass the needle up and under the first stitch on the loom. Remove the stitch from the peg and leave it on the yarn tail. Go to the next peg and remove the stitch from the peg with the needle. This stitch will also rest on the yarn tail. Continue working around the loom until all the stitches have been removed and are secured on the yarn tail.

Gently pull on the yarn tail, cinching the top of the item closed. Pass the needle through the center of the gathered stitches and turn the hat inside out. Do a few securing stitches. Knot your yarn and weave in the tail.

Bind off the cast on stitches at anchor yarn with crochet hook for a completed hat.

 

 

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Oct 16, 2017

Loom FAQs: How Do I Read A Chart?

 

 

 

 

 

Everybody loves a video.  Lots of people only use videos when making items because they prefer to not read patterns.  But  learning to read patterns is great because it opens up lots more projects to make since not every pattern has a complete video tutorial.

But wait…  There’s more.

Patterns actually come in 3 formats.

The first format is videos.  But like I mentioned, not all patterns are available in video format.

The second format is written patterns.  Patterns in written form are like reading code.  Words are abbreviated and sections are written as repeats so that the pattern itself is not the length of a novel written by Diana Gabaldon or George R. R. Martin…  But putting men from the Scottish Highlands and fear of long winters aside for the moment, it can get rather lengthy when a pattern is written out in full, and it really is like learning to read another language which means you do have to put forth the effort to learn to read the code.  If you are looking for more on reading a pattern, check out Loom FAQs:  How Do I Read A Pattern?

And the last format is charts.  While most patterns are not fully “written” in charts in knitting, the stitch pattern itself is.  Once a person can read both patterns and charts, there is nothing they cannot make.

Why EXACTLY are charts so great?

Charts are wonderful ways of conveying the stitch patterns without words.  It is truly universal.  Like mathematics, knitting charts can be read by anyone no matter what language they speak or read.  But there are other ways that charts are great as well.

For people who loom knit, we need to convert written needle patterns in order to make them on looms unless they are written in the round.  But when reading charts, needle knitters have to convert or change the wrong side rows while loom knitter do not.  Charts can be worked exactly as they appear row for row.  This is why I love stitch pattern books for knitting that contain charts.  And this is why all loom knitters should learn to read charts.  Then we don’t need special loom knitting stitch pattern books.  We can use the same book that the needle knitters use.

So how are charts read?

Before we get into how to read a chart, let’s discuss what the chart is.  A chart is just a grid of boxes where each box represents a stitch on a row or round.  It looks like graph paper.

While most charts for stitch patterns are made of boxes that are square like on regular graph paper, knitting stitches are not square.  Each knit stitch is shorter than it is wide.  Or wider than it is tall.  This is why there are more rows in an inch vertically than there stitches in an inch horizontally.  This is the reason that knitting graph paper for charting pictures or words is not made of squares.  These graphs have cells that are rectangular.  If you chart a picture with graph paper made of squares, the finished knitted picture will be short and fat when compared to the picture desired.  But when using charts to depict stitch patterns and not pictures, square cells are most commonly used.

Now we can discuss how to read a chart…

The following chart is the herringbone stitch pattern from the Stitchology column written by Bethany Daily here on the KB blog.  This stitch was the first in the Stitchology series.  If you haven’t been keeping up with Bethany’s column, then you are missing out on some fabulous stitch patterns.  And guess what?  She even covers reading stitch charts as well in the herringbone stitch post as well.  Maybe between us both, we will get the word out on how to read charts…  Here is the chart:

 

 

 

 

But the chart alone means nothing without the key.  In books, the key will not be found with every stitch chart.  It will most often be found in one of two places in the book.  Either in the front or the back.  Therefore, if you see a chart but not the key, you will be able to find it elsewhere.  If you cannot find it, then it is like looking for a treasure without a map.

PLEASE NOTE:

I do need to clarify something here.  While all knitting charts are shown from the right side, some needle stitch pattern books will have 2 keys for the symbols.  They will have a right side key and a wrong side key.  In these books, the wrong side key will be the same symbol as the right side but the opposite stitch for flat panels.  So it will have the symbol for knit on the right side and the same symbol for purl for the wrong side.

Also, when using needle stitch charts that do not have 2 keys, it will indicate the stitch for the right side and the stitch for the wrong side.

Loom knitters will ALWAYS use the right side stitch.  That is the part to remember.  RIGHT SIDE STITCH ONLY!

 

Here is the Chart Key:

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see in the above chart, the rows are numbered from the bottom to the top.

The cast on is not listed on the chart because the cast on is not considered a row.  It is simply the foundation of loops that all the rows sit on top of.

Also you need to remember that this is for the stitch pattern itself.  Not the complete pattern in most cases.  Therefore if there is a border at the bottom or the sides, those will need to be done before working these rows.

But if you are working a pattern that has a chart, you will need to cast on in certain direction ALWAYS when reading charts or patterns.  The reason is you will be working each stitch as it appears on the chart.  Stitch 1 on row 1 will always appear on the bottom right hand corner of the chart so that row 1 is worked from right to left.

This is the reason you will need to cast on from left to right when casting on for a flat panel so that you will be ready to start row 1 from right to left.

When casting on in the round, you will cast on from right to left so that you will be ready to work from right to left when starting round 1.

Now let’s look at the rows themselves on the chart.  On the right you see the odd rows numbered and on the left the even rows are numbers.  This is make the chart easier to read.  Especially for flat panels.  After working row 1 from right to left, you then work row 2 from left to right.  And there is the number 2 for the second row on the left hand side making it easier to find once you have worked you way across row 1.

But what exactly does each square mean?

The key tells us what stitch to use.  Each square represents a stitch.  This stitch pattern only uses knit and purl stitches.  Therefore there are only 2 types of squares.  In other words, this is a simple stitch pattern if you can keep up with which stitch goes where.

The empty squares do not mean that there isn’t a stitch.  It means those are the knit stitches.

The squares with the single dot in the middle are the purl stitches.

When the stitch pattern is more complicated, the symbols and where they are placed become more complex as well.  This is why it is better to start off with a simple stitch pattern when starting to read charts.

For most charts that are included with patterns, the charts only show just a certain number of stitches.  The number of stitches will vary chart to chart since these are the number of stitches that will be repeated.  For the herringbone stitch, the stitch is a repeat of 10 stitches.  If you are making something larger than 10 stitches, you will need to make the item with a multiple of 10 then add the number of stitches for the side borders on a flat panel.  If working in the round, it will just be the multiple of 10.

Now to start reading our chart.  When you start with the first row of the stitch pattern, you should be on the right side of the loom working to the left.  For the herringbone example, you will knit 3 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 1 stitch, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 2 stitches.  Then you will repeat those for however many repeats you are working.  For 30 stitches total, you will repeat it another 2 times for 3 times total.  For 100 stitches total, you will repeat for 9 times making it a total of 10 times.

Now for a flat panel, you are on the left side of the work getting ready to work from left to right on row 2.  You will follow the stitches on the chart from left to right this time.  Row 2 will be knit 1 stitch, then purl 2 stitches, then 3 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 2 stitches before repeating.

If you are working in the round, you will just continue working from right to left and follow the chart from right to left as well.  Round 2 would then be knit 2 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 3 stitches, then purl 2 stitches, then knit 1 stitch before repeating.

Then on to row or round 3…  Hopefully you have the idea now of what will need to be done for row 3.  And also see how long it takes to write out a row stitch for stitch…

What would this chart look like written out?

Well if the herringbone pattern was written out in a pattern without a chart, it would be written as follows for the stitch pattern with the chart on the right side for comparison:

Abbreviations for our little demonstration:

K: knit

P: purl

Rep: repeat

For a flat panel:

Row 1: *K3, P2, K1, P2, K2, rep from *

Row 2: *K1, P2, K3, P2, K2, rep from *

Row 3: *K1, P2, K5, P2, rep from *

Row 4: *P1, K2, P1, K1, P1, K2, P1, K1, rep from *

For in the round:

Round 1:  *K3, P2, K1, P2, K2, rep from *

Round 2:  *K2, P2, K3, P2, K1, rep from *

Round 3:  *K1, P2, K5, P2, rep from *

Round 4:  K1, P1, K2, P1, K1, P1, K2, P1, rep from *

 

I hope this helps clear up any confusion charts may present.  But something I have learned over the years is the best way to learn something is to just do it.  If you make mistakes, don’t worry!  With yarn, just pull it out and try again.  It is ok to make mistakes.  It is how we learn.

Now it’s time to put the fear of charts aside, grab a ball of yarn, and tackle that pattern you have been wanting to make!  Happy loom knitting!

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Oct 15, 2017

Polemonium Hat

Designed by Renita Harvey

Love the Jacob’s Ladder technique in crochet but don’t know how to crochet?  Try the new method of chaining loops developed by Renita Harvey that achieves the same design feature on a stockinette background by knitting this hat! 

Amaze your friends and family with this fun hat that incorporates both the braided chain loops and color changes.  Changing the color after each round of chain loops gives the “ladder” a more visible appearance.  Or use a self-striping yarn with long color changes to avoid changing colors manually.  This hat is also a great pattern for school and team colors as well as seasonal color combinations. 

The Polemonium Hat is easier than it appears making it a great pattern for those wanting to up their loom knitting game.

Knit on the All-n-One Loom, the Polemonium Hat has a decreased crown bringing all the “ladders” or braids together at the top achieving a nice clean finish.

LOOM:  80 pegs used, small gauge loom. Sample was knit using the All-n-One Loom.

YARN:  180 yds medium worsted weight yarn, KnitPicks Mighty Stitch in Colors Celestial, Gulfstream, Marina, Sky, and Mint 36 yds each color used in sample

NOTIONS:  Loom pick, stitch markers, paper clips, tapestry needle

GAUGE: 10 sts x 18 rows = 2”

SIZE:  Adult

ABBREVIATIONS

K:  knit

P:  purl

K2tog:  knit 2 together

Ch:  chain

CO:  cast On

BO:  bind Off

R:  round

Rep:  repeat

Dec:  decrease

CA:  Color A – Celestial

CB:  Color B – Gulfstream

CC:  Color C – Marina

CD:  Color D – Sky

CE:  Color E – Mint

SPECIAL STITCH

Chain:  knit same stitch the number of times listed.  Example:  Ch10 – knit the same stitch 10 times using the e-wrap knit stitch.

 PATTERN NOTES

Chain loops will be made on the inside of the hat.  Loops will be pushed though the eyelets made after the hat is off the loom.

 INSTRUCTIONS

Place stitch markers on pegs 1, 11, 21, 31, 41, 51, 61, and 71.  These are the pegs that the chain stitch will be worked.  Move the stitch marker with the stitch when working the decreases.

 With CA, CO 80 pegs and prepare to work in the round.

R1 – 5:  *K1, P1, rep from * around

R6:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R7 – 9:  Drop CA, add CB, K all

R10:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R11 – 13:  Drop CB, add CC, K all

R14:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R15 – 17:  Drop CC, add CD, K all

R18:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R19 – 21:  Drop CD, add CE, K all

R22:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R23 – 25:  Drop CE, pick up CA, K all

R26:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R27 – 29:  Drop CA, pick up CB, K all

R30:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R31 – 33:  Drop CB, pick up CC, K all

R34:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R35 – 37:  Drop CC, pick up CD, K all

R38:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R39 – 41:  Drop CD, pick up CE, K all

R42:  *Ch10, K9, rep from * around

R43 – 63:  Rep R23 – 42, once

R63 – 65:  Drop CE, pick up CA, K all

Decrease Crown:

Note:  Adjust loom with each decrease round so there are no empty pegs.

  • Place all the stitches on a piece of scrap yarn in a contrasting color approximately 20” long before working the decrease round.
  • Adjust the loom to the new peg count listed at the end of the decrease round.
  • Place the stitches back on the loom following the instructions for that row by placing 2 stitches on the peg for the K2tog and 1 stitch on each of the rest of the pegs. Make sure the stitch markers for the chain loops are moved to the new pegs as well.
  • Work the row as instructed.

R66: (Dec) *Ch10, K7, K2tog, rep from * around – 72 stitches

R67:  Cut CA leaving tail to weave in, pick up CB, K all

R68: (Dec) *K7, K2tog, rep from * around – 64 stitches

R69:  K all

R70: (Dec) *Ch10, K5, K2tog, rep from * around – 56 stitches

R71:  Cut CB leaving tail to weave in, pick up CC, K all

R72: (Dec) *K5, K2tog, rep from * around – 48 stitches

R73:  K all

R74: (Dec) *Ch10, K3, K2tog, rep from * around – 40 stitches

R75:  Cut CC leaving tail to weave in, pick up CD, K all

R76: (Dec) *K3, K2tog, rep from * around – 32 stitches

R77:  K all

R78: (Dec) *Ch10, K1, K2tog, rep from * around – 24 stitches

R79:  Cut CD leaving tail to weave in, pick up CE, K all

R80: (Dec) *K1, K2tog, rep from * around – 16 stitches (Note:  This will be the last time to decrease the loom.  Rows 81 – 83 will be worked skipping the empty peg by bringing the working yarn behind the peg.)

R81:  K all

R82:  *Move stitch on peg to the left of stitch marker over on to the peg with stitch marker, Ch5, rep from * around – 8 stitches

R83:  K all

Place each remaining stitch on a paper clip and remove from loom.

Cut working yarn leaving a tail 6” long for weaving in.

 

Finishing:

 

 

Loops are on the inside of the hat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Push chain loops through the eyelets created by the chains so the loops are on the outside of the hat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Braid each spoke by starting at the bottom loop, twist the loop,

 

 

 

 

 

 

then pull the loop above it through the bottom loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue by pulling the loop above through the loop below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

until the top of the hat is reached and the last smaller loop is pulled through.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then pull the paper clip with the live stitch through the final chain loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

leaving the paper clip on the stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thread yarn tail on tapestry needle and through each stitch.  Remove paper clips and gather.

Secure and weave in ends.

 

6 Comments

  • Very, very pretty Renita!

  • This is a fantastic design, Renita! Love it! ?

  • Can this pattern be made on the Rotating Board using 1 ring or even better both rings.
    Thanks

  • This is a very pretty and educational pattern. I tempted to go outside my basic stitches comfort zone.
    I’m going to start small, making a baby hat.
    Thank you for making this patter.

  • Thank you, Bethany!

  • Gail,
    This pattern is designed to be decreased at the top which is why it is written for the All-n-One loom. While it could be adapted to be made on the DKL, it couldn’t be decreased for the crown, and another way to finish off the braids would need to be devised. It really couldn’t be made with both rings on the DKL.

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Oct 8, 2017

Faire Isle Beanie

Finally, a warm, stylish beanie that will be equally stunning on 5th Avenue or at the high school football game! Fair Isle is a knitting technique that uses multiple strands of different colored yarn to create intricate knit patterns. This hat will quickly become a staple accessory in your wardrobe!

LOOM: ‘Premium’ Round Loom Set (Large, 80 peg loom)

YARN: Worsted Weight (#4)

Red Hearts Super Saver (100% Acrylic) used in sample

Color A: approximately 60 g/110 yds (Soft Navy used in sample)

Color B: approximately 20 g/37 yds (Charcoal used in sample)

SIZE: Adult Unisex

COMPLEXITY: Late beginner to early intermediate

ABBREVIATIONS

st(s): Stitch(es)

rnd: Round

ek: E-wrap knit stitch

rep: Repeat

INSTRUCTIONS

Because this pattern is worked in the round, the pattern may be slightly staggered by one row between the first and last stitches in the round. This is normal and should be expected.

Note: A chart is located at the bottom of the pattern for your convenience. If using the chart, starting from the bottom, repeat the chart 16 times until you reach the end of each row. Then move up to the next row. Refer to the pattern for instructions between rows.

Cast on 80 sts in color A, prepare to work in the round

 Rnd 1-21: ek80 in color A

The brim is created by bringing the cast on row stitches (the bottom row of the work on the loom) back onto the top of the pegs. You should now have two rows of yarn on your pegs (row 21 on the bottom of the pegs and the cast on row on the top of the pegs). Next, simply work row 21 over the cast on row. This will create the double-thick brim.

Rnd 22: *ek1 in color A, ek1 in color B, ek 3 in color A; rep from * to end of rnd

 Rnd 23: *ek1 in color B, ek1 in color A, ek1 in color B, ek2 in color A; rep from * to end of rnd

 Rnd 24-25: *ek3 in color A, ek2 in color B; rep from * to end of rnd

 Rnd 26: rep rnd 23

 Rnd 27: rep rnd 22

 Rnd 28: *ek4 in color A, ek1 in color B, rep from * to end of rnd

 Rnd 29: *ek3 in color A, ek1 in color B, ek1 in color A, rep from * to end of rnd

 Rnd 30: rep rnd 28

 Rnd 31: rep rnd 29

 Rnd 32-33: ek80 in color A

 Rnd 34-36: *ek3 in color B, ek2 in color A; rep from * to end of rnd

 Rnd 37-38: rep rnd 32

 Rnd 39-40: ek80 in color B

 Rnd 41-42: rep rnd 32

 Rnd 43-44: rep rnd 39

 Rnd 45-47: *ek3 in color A, ek2 in color B; rep from * to end of rnd

 Rnd 48-50: rep rnd 39

 Rnd 51-55: rep rnd 32

Bind off with gather removal method. Weave in ends.

Finish by attaching a pompom in color B to the top of the hat.

 

CHART

(Click on chart to enlarge.)

Save

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Oct 2, 2017

Bobbles and Seed Stitch: Stitchology 37

This month is all about creating the classic look of bobbles! There are so many stitches that incorporate bobbles into their design that a column of stitch tutorials would be remiss not to include them. After playing with many different types of bobbles, I came up with a version that is nice and plump and provides that wonderful “pop” that they are famous for. The steps involved in creating these happy little bumps are broken down in written and video format, and the bobbles are then inserted into two repeating patterns for your enjoyment.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap, unless otherwise stated.

Abbreviations

K,k: knit

P,p: purl

KO: knit off (lift bottom loop(s) over top loop and completely over the top of the peg)

WY: working yarn

HH: half hitch (create a loop with WY by twisting in opposite way than when making an EW and place on peg. The WY will be coming from underneath the twist rather than on top.)

rep: repeat.

 

Chart Key for Repeating Pattern Rows

Steps to Create a Bobble (Bobbles can be worked going in either direction on the loom…Simply number the bobble pegs 1-3 in the order they are worked in the first bobble step.):

Step 1: k3

Step 2: move the loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Move the loop from peg 3 also to peg 2. KO 2 loops over 1 on peg 2.

Step 3: HH onto peg 3, k peg 2, HH onto peg 1.

Step 4: (k3) repeat 3 times, will end on peg 3.

Step 5: move the loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Move the loop from peg 3 also to peg 2. KO 2 loops over 1 on peg 2.

Step 6: reach down at the back side of the work and pull up the 3 loops from the base of the bobble that were knit in Step 1 and place them back onto pegs 1-3.

Step 7: WY will be coming from peg 2. K peg 3.  Continue with remainder of row.

Step 8: Knit next row of pattern, KO 2 loops over 1 on peg 2 of bobble.

Here’s a video of just the steps to make a bobble:

 

Working Bobbles into a Basic Stitch

This basic stitch uses a multiple of 9 pegs x 9 rows. The bobble itself requires 3 pegs and is worked on Row 5 only. The extra pegs and rows around these 3 bobble pegs act as a buffer between the bobbles when repeated. The number of “buffer” pegs and rows can be adjusted as desired to meet the needs of the project.

(Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 9. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Rows 1-4: k9

Row 5: k3, create bobble, k3.

Row 6: k4, k 2 loops as one on peg 5, k4.

Rows 7-9:  k9

 

Bobble & Seeds Repeating Pattern 

To work this pattern in the round, such as for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time. Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 22—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

Working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 22. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Rows 1-4: *k11, p1, k9, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 5: *k4, create bobble, k4, p1, k3, create bobble, k3, p1, rep from * to end.

Rows 6-9: Repeat Rows 1-4.

Rows 10 & 11: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Rows 12-15: Repeat Rows 1-4.

Row 16: Repeat Row 5.

Rows 17-20: Repeat Rows 1-4.

Rows 21 & 22: Repeat Rows 10 & 11.

Rep rows 1-22 for desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 22):

Rounds 1-4:  Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Round A:*k11, p1, k9, p1, rep from * to end.

Round B: *p1, k9, p1, k11, rep from * to end.

Round 5: *k4, create bobble, k4, p1, k3, create bobble, k3, p1, rep from * to end.

Rounds 6-9:  Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Round C: *p1, k9, p1, k11, rep from * to end.

Round D: *k11, p1, k9, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 10: *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Round 11: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Rounds 12-15:  Repeat Rounds 6-9.

Round 16: *p1, k3, create bobble, k3, p1, k4, create bobble, k4, rep from * to end.

Rounds 17-20:  Repeat Rounds 1-4.

Round 21: *k1, p1, rep from * to end.

Round 22: *p1, k1, rep from * to end.

Rep rows 1-22 for desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

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Oct 1, 2017

Zippy Fall Cowl Set

Fall is in the air, it is time to take out the Zippy and get zippying along! Start this fall off with this super quick and stylish Cowl and Fingerless mitt set.

LOOM:  Master Zippy Loom Set + 2 Zippy (28 pegs total)

YARN:  225 yards of Super Bulky weight 100% merino wool. 1.5 skeins Malabrigo Rasta in Pearl Tan.

NOTIONS:  tapestry needle, row counter (optional).

GAUGE: 6 sts x 5 rows=2 inches in stockinette

SIZE:  Fingerless mitts: 7.5 inches long. Cowl: 10 inches when laid flat.

ABBREVIATIONS
k=knit stitch

p=purl stitch

st(s)=stitch(es)

INSTRUCTIONS

Assemble Zippy Master Set with the two additional Zippy Looms as shown in this picture.

 

 

 

Cast on 28 sts, prepare to work in the round.

Round 1: k to end of row.

Round 2: p to end of row.

Rep Round 1 and Round 2: 10 more times.

From this point forward, you will be working as a flat panel.

Next row: k to end row.

Next row: Decrease row–Place loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Place loop from peg 28 to peg 27. Only 26 pegs have stitches. P to end of row (treat the pegs with the two loops as if it was one loop, grab both loops and purl the peg).  Each Decrease Row, you will be decreasing by two stitches by moving the stitches from the outer edges to the inner pegs.

*Next row: k to end of row.

Next row: Decrease Row–Place loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Place loop from peg 27 to peg 26. Only 24 pegs have stitches. P to end of row (treat the pegs with the two loops as if it was one loop, grab both loops and purl the peg).

Repeat from * to * until 2 stitches remain.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave all ends in.

Steam block if necessary.

Fingerless Mitts

(make 2)

Cast on 15 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Row 1-10: k to end of row.

Row 11, 13, 15, 17: p to end of row.

Row 12, 14, 16, 18: k to end of row.

Bind off with basic bind off method.

Seaming—use the mattress stitch to seam the cast on edge to bind off edge. As you seam, maintain the garter stitch ridges to the top of the hand

Mattress stitch seam 4 inches from the bottom up, leave a 1.5 inch opening, then continue to seam the top 2 inches.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave all ends in.

Steam block if necessary.

 

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Sep 23, 2017

Ribbing Stitch for Double Knit Loom

Knitting double knit in the round on the Double Knit Loom requires the regular double knit stitches to be reinvented to work with the circular shape. There has been some confusion concerning the wrap starting on the beginning peg, or not. Originally the Rib Stitch on the DKL was worked NOT starting on first peg, after the cast on. But this made row counting difficult, and didn’t make sense for many knitters.

We have revised the RIBBING STITCH in the round to work by coming back around to the beginning peg. This STITCH NOW STARTS ON BEGINNING PEG FOR EACH AND EVERY ROUND.  We are using the peg marked with the arrow on outer loom as the beginning peg.

Steps…

1. Wrap from beginning peg (peg 1) to peg 3 on inner loom.

2 Continue wrapping ‘every other peg’ until you wrap the peg across from the starting peg (starting peg marked with stitch marker). Skip the 2 pegs (marked with red arrows), wrap peg adjacent to the starting peg, then go to inner loom and wrap the consecutive peg. This will change your angle.

 

 

3. Then continue wrapping ‘every other’ peg.  You will be working in same direction, but at opposite angle.

4. When you end the round, the wrapping should look like photo below.

5. At this point, lay an anchor yarn around the stitches, between the looms, with yarn tails dangling below the looms.

6. Then repeat the process again starting with wrap around the starting peg on outer loom.  Once you have two rounds complete, hook over all pegs starting with outer loom.  Continue working as many rib rounds as desired or as pattern dictates, always starting on beginning peg.

2 Comments

  • I bought your sock loom the one that you can adjust by skidding the one piece it is plastic. I was watching a video on knitting a sock and the tool that was suppose to come with this loom is not the one I got with my loom. The other one looks like it is a lot Easter to use. Where can I buy one like that. It had an extra little hook on the end. Thank You.

  • Please contact us at info@knittingboard.com and send us a picture of the knitting tool you receive and we can confirm whether you received the correct knitting tool. We only have two knitting tools–one with a wooden handle and one with an orange handle; both have only one little hook.

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Sep 21, 2017

Loom FAQs: What Is A Provisional Cast On?

 

 

 

 

 

There are always so many questions in the loom knitting world on social media.  Why is my bind off so tight?  How I can match my bind off to my cast on?  What is waste yarn?  How do I cast on and still have live stitches for grafting?  

One of the more common problems in the world of loom knitting the getting the cast on and bind off to match.  Most people cannot get the tension on both ends to match due to the differences in the cast on and bind off methods.  But never fear.  There is a solution to that.

And while that one question at the first seems a bit off topic, all of the questions above do have the same answer.

That answer is using waste yarn to cast on.

What is waste yarn?

Waste yarn is just yarn of another color that is used to cast on and then used to knit the first few rows.

Why would I use waste yarn to cast on?

When waste yarn is used to cast on, the yarn that will then be used in the project can be added so that the waste yarn can be removed later.

Why would I want to remove the waste yarn?

While there are a lot of reasons to use waste yarn to cast on, there is only one main reason to remove the waste yarn after casting on.

That reason is to leave live stitches on the cast on end of the project.

What are “live stitches”?

Live stitches are the loops that are to be worked in knitting.  Generally speaking those are the stitches that are always on the pegs of the loom waiting to worked.  When binding off, those live stitches are being “closed” or ended so they will not run or unravel when the work is removed from the loom.

Why would I want live stitches on the cast on end?

There are a couple of very good reasons for wanting to have live stitches on the cast on end of a piece of work.

And both reason have to do with finishing the piece.

The first reason is so the work can then be placed back on the loom so that you can use the same bind off you used on the other end.  This is the best way to get both ends to match since they are worked in the exact same manner.

The second reason is so the cast on and bind off edges can be grafted together using the kitchener stitch to get a seamless join when making infinity scarves or other garments where you want to join but do not want a visible seam.

How do I work the provisional cast on so I get live stitches on the cast on edge to do with as my heart desires?

I am so very glad you asked!  Let’s get started!

Provisional Cast On

There are 2 things you will need when working a provisional cast on.  Well 1 thing definitely.  The other is just very highly recommended by yours truly in order to make your life easier and meaningful…

You will need waste yarn and a life line.  While both of those are just yarn, I would like to make certain recommendations first.

Waste Yarn 

When using waste yarn, you will want to use yarn that you will not be using again.  It does not need to be the same type of yarn you are using in the project.  If you are using high end yarn, please do not use the same for the waste yarn.  Why?  Well it IS called WASTE yarn for a reason.  You may be cutting it and most likely will not be able to reuse it so it becomes trash or waste.

I suggest using an inexpensive yarn that is a contrasting color.  You will want to be able to tell the difference between the waste yarn and the project yarn.

Lifeline

Life lines are just yarn in a different color as well.  But unlike waste yarn, you can reuse yarn that is used for lifelines.  Another suggestion is that the lifeline be a different color than the waste yarn AND the project.  This is so there is no confusion between the 3 different things.  I am one that tries my hardest to keep from being confused.  And my yarn is the one thing I have complete control over in my life.

If you are new to using lifelines in your work,  you can find more information in Loom FAQs  What Is a Lifeline?  The method that we will be doing here is adding the lifeline after the work is off the loom but the stitches that will be picked up are not the ones shown in the article.  More on that later.

Now let’s get started.

I have a loom, my project yarn which is the purple, my waste yarn which is the beige, and my lifeline which is orange.

First we will cast on with the waste yarn.  Doesn’t matter what cast on you use.  I suggest using the simplest and quickest which is the wrap cast on.

Now we will work about 6 rows of knit.  Doesn’t matter which knit stitch you use on this part.  It doesn’t need to match the rest of the work since we will be taking it off

Now we cut our waste yarn leaving a short tail.  It is finished for this project.

Add your project yarn in whatever manner you like when joining your yarn.

Here I have placed the slip knot on a neighboring peg so I can start knitting on peg 1.

The russian join is not a good one here since you still need that end.  You will want to leave a tail long enough to work whatever bind off or seaming technique you are planning on using when finishing the cast on edge later.

If you will be seaming with the kitchener stitch, leave a yarn tail about 1 and a half lengths of the pegs that are cast on.

If you plan on working the basic bind off, then you will want to leave a yarn tail at least 3 lengths of the pegs that are cast on.

You can simply put a slip knot on the first peg and then start working your pattern from here at row 1.

Or if you are like me and do not like knots in your work, just simply start row.  You do not need a knot or an anchor peg.  Just start knitting.  More on how to do that can be found in Loom FAQs:  Why Not Knots?

Continue until you are finished with your bind off on the other end.

Here you can see the work after it is off the loom

If you are wanting to graft the 2 ends together, simply place a second lifeline through the stitches on the loom and remove it.  Unless you will be adding the cast on edge to the bind off edge and binding them off together.  Then just leave it on the loom…

 

Now we will place the lifeline.  The lifeline will be placed in a different manner since we will be unraveling from the cast on end.  The loops are that need the lifeline are not the loops that are on the pegs which is why we didn’t place the lifeline as we went.  If the lifeline is placed through the stitches on the pegs, the lifeline will not go through the live stitches once the waste yarn is removed.  Sounds crazy, I know.  But just trust me on this.  When unraveling from the cast on end, the live stitches are between the pegs, not on them.

 

Turn the work over to see the back.

The first row where the project yarn can be seen are the stitches that will be picked up by the lifeline.

They are the ones at the bottom still in the beige stitches.

 

 

 

Thread the lifeline onto the tapestry needle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and run the needle through each of the loops until all are on the lifeline.

 

 

 

 

 

Since the lifeline has been placed, there is no need to fear dropped stitches.

Simply cut the work here on the waste yarn and then unravel the rest of the waste yarn until all that is left is the project with all the live stitches securely on the lifeline.

 

Or you can just pull the end tail of the waste yarn out across the piece so the waste yarn may be used again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now you are free to do whatever you please with those live stitches.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are wanting to bind off that end like the other end, simply put those stitches back on the loom and then bind off in the method of choice.

If you are wanting to bind off the cast on and bind off ends together, just place the stitches back on the loom over the stitches that are already on there by bring the work up through the middle of the loom making sure you do not catch the loom in the middle of the scarf.  Yes.  It has been done.  Yes.  I have seen it.

If you are wanting to graft the 2 ends together, proceed with whatever manner you choose whether it be the kitchener stitch on needles or putting the cast on end over the bind off end on the loom so that the kitchener stitch can be worked on the loom.  Both methods of working the Kitchener stitch can be found in Loom FAQs:  What Are The Tricks To Knitting Socks?

 

Well there you have it!  Waste yarn, the provisional cast on, and reasons why you would want live stitches on the cast on end.

Hope all your loom knitting projects have a happy ending!

2 Comments

  • This is sooooo helpful. Thank you for posting this and adding the detailed photos.

  • A very well written and photographed tutorial. I will definitely try this. Thanks for taking the time to wrie it!

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Sep 17, 2017

Lace Shawlette

The rotating loom mechanism makes the stitch pattern on this Lace Shawlette a breeze! Pick a self-striping yarn and let the nature of the yarn do the work for you! This shawlette makes the perfect accessory for the upcoming fall!

LOOM:  Double Knit Loom was used as a single sided rake, outside rail only, 51 pegs used.

YARN:  Approx 440 yds of worsted weight acrylic yarn. Sample used Lion Brand Landscapes in Boardwalk, 3 skeins. 

NOTIONS:  tapestry needle, row counter (optional).

GAUGE: Not relevant.

SIZE:  18 W x 68 L inches after blocking.

ABBREVIATIONS

ek=ewrap knit

p=purl

yo=yarn over. Ewrap the empty peg.

td=triple decrease. Over 3 pegs, peg 1 is on the right, peg 2 in the middle, peg 3 on the left. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2, move loop from peg 3 to peg 2. Peg 1 is empty, peg 2 has 3 loops on it, you will treat the 3 loops as one loop when working the peg, peg 3 is empty.

PATTERN NOTE: The pattern is worked in ewrap knit stitch.

INSTRUCTIONS

Cast on 51 sts, prepare to work a flat panel

Row 1: p to end of row.

Row 2: ek to end of row.

Row 3: p to end of row.

Row 4: ek to end of row.

Row 5: p to end of row.

Row 6: ek to end of row.

Row 7: p3, *yo, td, yo, ek3; rep from * to last 6 sts, yo, td, yo, p3.

Row 8: ek to end of row.

Row 9: p3, *ek3, yo, td, yo; rep from * to last 6 sts, ek3, p3.

Row 10: ek to end of row.

 

Rep Rows 7-10 until item measures 48 inches from cast on row.

Next 6 rows

Next row: p to end of row.

Next row: ek to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Next row: ek to end of row.

Next row: p to end of row.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave all ends in.

Steam block to measurements.

Short how-to video coming soon!

 

 

8 Comments

  • Gorgeous work!!! Thank you so much for this.Great project for Loom-along on the KB site!

  • Love it. My next project.

  • The shawlette looks beautiful. I’m confused about what we are supposed to do to peg 2 after we’ve moved the loops from pegs 1 and 3 to peg 2. We yarnover past peg 1, then do we e-wrap and knit off peg 2 before doing a yarnover on peg 3? Do we purl it? Or do we slip peg 2 to move to peg 3?

  • What a gorgeous pattern! I bet it would be amazing in homespun yarn!

  • You are moving the loops from peg 1 to peg 2, then from peg 3 to peg 2. Pegs 1 and 3 are empty. You will ewrap (yarn over) peg 1, knit peg 2 (treating all the loops on peg 2 as one loop), ewrap (yarn over) peg 3. Hope this helps.

  • Can’t wait for the how to video so that I will be able to make this beautiful scarf.

  • Hi, thanks for your patience. It is almost ready and we are working really hard to be sure it contains everything you are needing. Pat

  • Will the note that says “short video coming soon” change to a link to the video? I have this bookmarked and want to make sure I can find it when it comes out. I have the first six rows on the loom and am just waiting to make sure I understand the 7th row instructions :)

    I’ve already made a cowl on the rotating loom and LOVE LOVE LOVE it!

    Anxiously waiting…

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Sep 11, 2017

Alani Lace Socks

It is not secret, knitting socks is one of my favorite past times. There is nothing more soothing than seeing those tiny stitches popping down from the knitting loom. The process is hypnotic and soothing. A little bit of lace lends these socks a delicate feel. 

LOOM: His & Her Sock Looms, sample used 56 peg, orange loom.
YARN: Approx. 250 yards DK weight yarn. Sample used 1 skein Malabrigo, Arroyo (335 yards, 100% superwash merino wool) Pool color.
NOTIONS: knitting tool, (2) peg markers, tapestry needle, (2) US 2 double pointed needles
GAUGE: 14 sts x 21 rows = 2 inches in stockinette
SIZE: Sample is approx women’s size 6.5-7.

ABBREVIATIONS

Approx=approximately
k=knit stitch (note: the U-stitch was used for sample).
CO=cast on
BO=bind off
WY=working yarn
yo=yarn over
ssk=slip, slip, knit. Over two pegs. Peg 1 is on the right and peg 2 on the left. Move loop from peg 2 to peg 1. Knit peg 1, treating both loops on peg 1 as one loop.
k2tog=knit two together. Over two pegs. Peg is on the right, peg 2 on the left. Move loop from peg 1 to peg 2. Knit peg 2, treating both loops on peg 1 as one loop.
st(s)=stitch(es)
rnd(s)=round(s)
rep=repeat
w&t=wrap and turn (lift the loop(s) from the peg, wrap working yarn around empty peg and replace held loop(s) back onto peg.)

PATTERN NOTES
Sample is approx Women’s size 6.5-7.5. To make a sock for other sizes on the 56 peg, orange loom, simply adjust the number of leg and foot rounds to equal desired lengths.

INSTRUCTIONS

CO 56 pegs, prepare to work in the round. (sample used ewrap cast on)

CUFF

Rnd 1-20: *k2, p2; rep from * to end.
Rnd 21: k to end of rnd.
Rnd 22: *yo, k1, ssk, k2tog, k1, yo, k1; rep from * to end of rnd.

Rep Rnds 21 and 22: 2 more times. Rep Row 21.

HEEL

Set peg/stitch markers on pegs 1 and 28.
Pegs 10-19 are the pegs that will be left unwrapped during the w&t process. There will be 9 pegs on either side of the center pegs that will be the W&T pegs.

Refer to Short-row heel/toe instructions at the end of pattern for specific details.

At end of heel instructions- working yarn will be at peg 1 of Heel (Peg 28).

FOOT

Next rnd: k28, * yo, k1, ssk, k2tog, k1, yo, k1; rep from * to end of rnd.
Next rnd: k to end of rnd

Rep last 2 rnds until foot measures
6.5″ from back of heel. To make item for larger sizes, continue working until sock foot measures (measure from back of heel) 2.5 inches less than desired total length. 

TOE

Follow the same instructions as for the Heel to create the toe. Refer to Short-row heel/toe instructions at the end of pattern for specific details.

FINISHING

Keeping the stitches from twisting, mount the first 28 stitches onto a double pointed needle. Place the remainder 28 stitches onto second double pointed needle.

Bind off all stitches using the Kitchener Stitch. Tutorial:
http://www.knittingboard.com/kitchener-stitch-page/

Weave ends in. Block lightly.

Short-row heel/toe Instructions for 56 Pegs

Row 1: k27, w&t peg 28
Row 2: k26, w&t peg 1
Row 3: k25, w&t peg 27
Row 4: k24, w&t peg 2
Row 5: k23, w&t peg 26
Row 6: k22, w&t peg 3
Row 7: k21, w&t peg 25
Row 8: k20, w&t peg 4
Row 9: k19, w&t peg 24
Row 10: k18, w&t peg 5
Row 11: k17, w&t peg 23
Row 12: k16, w&t peg 6
Row 13: k15, w&t peg 22
Row 14: k14, w&t peg 7
Row 15: k13, w&t peg 21
Row 16: k12, w&t peg 8
Row 17: k11, w&t peg 20
Row 18: k10, w&t peg 9

(Pegs 10-19 do not have wraps on them)

(Note: The following increase rows will require both lifting and working all previous wraps and stitches together as one as the pegs are knit and w&t’d. This can be up to 2 wraps and a stitch worked as one.)

Row 19: k11, w&t peg 21
Row 20: k12, w&t peg 8
Row 21: k13, w&t peg 22
Row 22: k14, w&t peg 7
Row 23: k15, w&t peg 23
Row 24: k16, w&t peg 6
Row 25: k17, w&t peg 24
Row 26: k18, w&t peg 5
Row 27: k19, w&t peg 25
Row 28: k20, w&t peg 4
Row 29: k21, w&t peg 26
Row 30: k22, w&t peg 3
Row 31: k23, w&t peg 27
Row 32: k24, w&t peg 2
Row 33: k25, w&t peg 28
Row 34: k26, w&t peg 1

Peg 1 and Peg 28 still have wraps on them. Continue to the foot instructions. On the first round, knit off the wraps together with the stitch (3 over 1) as the next round is worked.

 

5 Comments

  • i recently purchased the his/hers sock loom and i am having difficult time trying to figure out.
    i have read about 4 or 5 times and still nothing, i try step by step and still lost.

    Do you have a tutorial video for this his/hers sock loom???

    i see one for everything else, but no his/hers sock loom… thanks for any help given…

    i am a beginner, so need from start till finish…

  • This MIGHT become my first pair of loom knit socks!

  • Hi, these sock looms are used the same way as the others. You can follow the videos that we have for the other sock looms and it will work for this loom.

  • Hi, how would you work the ‘yo’ at the beginning of row 22? Would the first peg end up having two loops on it?

    Thanks for your help.

  • I have a question and it relates to the toe section.
    For the heel you do the reinforcement and then continue on to do the leg.
    When you are doing the toe, do you skip that part? When you have finished the section do you just do the bind off starting from peg 1?
    None of the videos explains what is to be done. They just say heel and toe section are done the same.

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Sep 4, 2017

Stitchology 36: Triple Wrap Around Stitch

This month’s stitch creates a lacy, yet still plush design that is reminiscent of cresting waves upon ocean beaches, seashells, or even fish scales (holey mackerel, lol!). It uses a new technique of wrapping back and forth between two pegs at a time to achieve this lovely effect.  Feel free to use this stitch for pretty much any type of project, as it is beautiful when viewed from either side.

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The “triple wrap around” (TWA) referred to in this pattern is a combination of techniques worked on just two pegs, moving back and forth between them in the following manner (instructions are to begin from right to left/clockwise):

Step 1: S2 (carry working yarn (WY) behind pegs 1 & 2)

Step 2: Bring WY around to the front of peg 2 and SWYF (slip stitch with working yarn in front of peg: see below for more info) on peg 2 and on peg 1.

Step 3: Bring WY behind peg 1 and 2 and around to the front of the peg 2.  SWYF again on peg 2.

Step 4: Bring WY between peg 2 and peg 1 and around to the front of peg 1, creating an E-wrap.

Step 5: KO peg 1.  K peg 2.

 

(SWYF) directly translates to: Slip With Working Yarn in Front. This simply means that this peg will not be worked, but will have the working yarn (WY) carried to the front of the work.  To do this, simply remove the loop already on the peg, slip the WY in front of the work and behind the peg, then replace the held loop back onto the peg.

*Note: another easy way to work a SWYF is to begin to work a purl stitch, but instead of lifting the original loop off the peg and placing the new loop on the peg as you do when purling, simply KO the new loop, leaving the original one in place.  Pull gently to free the WY, which will now be between the peg and the front of the work.

 

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

*Note: The stitches in the chart that are bordered with darker lines are the Repeating Pattern Rows/Stitches.

When working a Flat Panel, the stitches outside the border square are worked only once: at the end of the odd rows, after all the repeats of the Repeating Pattern Rows are completed and at the beginning of the even rows, before the Repeating Pattern Rows are worked and repeated.

When working in the Round, only repeat the 4 stitches of the Repeating Pattern Rows within the border…the stitches outside the border squares are not worked at all.  Make sure to simply read each row from right to left and work in a clockwise direction.

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 4, plus 2 extra stitches at the end. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Row 1: *k2, TWA, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 2:  k all sts.

Row 3: *TWA, k2, rep from * to last 2 sts, TWA.

Row 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rows 1-4 until desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 4):

Round 1:  *k2, TWA, rep from * to end.

Round 2: k all sts.

Round 3: *TWA, k2, rep from * to end.

Round 4:  k all sts.

Repeat Rounds 1-4 until desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

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Aug 28, 2017

Double Knit ‘in the round’ Instructions

We have received many requests for how-to instructions and videos for the ‘rotating’ Double Knit Loom. Videos are in the works… stay tuned for those.

There are detailed instructions that come with the loom, but we will provide here as well. In this venue, we have the ability to make photos bigger, which can be really helpful. Also if you have questions about the process or the loom, you can ask in comments and get an answer quickly.
The process of knitting double knit ‘in the round’ is a bit different from double knitting on a straight loom or knitting board.  Actually the movement/ process is much easier…. no turning the loom to other side. You simply knit continuous in one direction around the loom. Simply rotate the loom as you weave, and hook over stitches; your knitting location stays in one spot.
In double knitting, you are using 2 pegs as one stitch, one peg on the outer loom,  and the peg directly across on the inner loom (stockinette).  After lots of testing, we found 52 stitches to be the ideal amount of stitches for an adult size hat.

Cast On (in the round)

 IMPORTANT:  First thing, make sure the arrows on the inner loom and the outer loom line up. They are there so the peg spacing is in correct position.

1. To begin, start with a loop knot and put on the first peg on outer loom.  You can mark this peg with a stitch marker, or use the outer arrow.  Wrap the next peg on inner loom, to the R of arrow on inner loom. Wrap ‘every other’ peg, alternating from outer to inner loom.

Keep going around the loom with same weaving, like above. When you reach the starting peg, wrap the adjacent peg (to left of starting peg) on the outer loom. Two pegs will be wrapped consecutively.

2. Then continue around the loom again in the same, ‘every other’ wrapping pattern. (Working the 2 consecutive pegs adjusts your weaving, so that now, you will wrap pegs skipped in the first time around loom).

Make sure, after working around loom (2 times), all pegs have one wrap. As you work, allow the loom to turn-no need to move the loom. 

3. Now cut a piece of yarn approx. 35 inches long. Lay across stitches and around the loom between the inner and outer loom pegs (blue yarn) .

4. Repeat steps 1 and 2.  Wrap around the loom two times again, putting a second wrap on all pegs. Now, all pegs will have 2 wraps.

5. Hook over the bottom loop over the top loop on all pegs. Do this on both sides of the loom (front of the outer loom and back of the inner loom). Push sts down from top of loom after the row is hooked over.

Hook over loops on the front of outer loom

Hook over loops on inside of inner loom

 Now the stitches are cast on. From the cast on row, continue in any stitch pattern. Stitches may seem to be loose for first few rows, but they will even up after you get further along in the knitting.

Stockinette Stitch

This stitch is worked with the same process as Stockinette Cast On. It creates a smooth even knit pattern.

Weave front to back, wrap the outer loom peg and then wrap the inner loom peg in same pattern as with stockinette cast on, skipping “every other’ peg. Wrap 2 times around the loom.

Then with knit hook, take bottom loop over the top loop on each peg. Simple repeat the above to create knit as long as desired.

Ribbing Stitch 

This is a great stitch for hat brims, cowls or scarves. This stitch is similar to the stockinette, except it’s done at an angle. Work with even number of stitches.

Start from the starting peg on outer loom and wrap to the 3rd peg to R on the inner loom. Wrap that peg, and then back to the outer loom, keeping the ‘every other’ peg pattern. Wrap this peg.  This creates the angle for the ribbing stitch.

Continue around the loom, maintaining the angle with ‘every other’ peg, until you get to peg opposite the starting peg. Wrap this peg, the  peg on outer loom to left of starting peg (black arrow).  This creates 2 pegs wrapped consecutively on the outer loom. Do not wrap the starting peg.

Now change angle and wrap the empty peg (black arrow) directly across on the inner loom.

This is the return angle for the ribbing stitch and note, it is at an opposite angle from the first round.  This change of direction is what creates the ribbing. Continue around loom, until all pegs have one loop.  You will end with peg to L of starting peg on inner loom. This is how it should look…

Hook over all pegs from outer loom, and then on inner loom. Push stitches down and continue steps for ribbing rows.

Gather Bind Off  (for Hats)

Move the stitches from inner loom to the outer loom. Then with 2 loops on each peg on the outer loom, hook over the bottom loop over the top loop.

Moving stitches from inner loom to outer loom

Bottom loop over top loop (outer loom)

Cut the working yarn coming from the hat, leaving 16-20” tail for the gathering process. Take a darning needle and thread yarn tail. Use the yarn tail to hold the stitches. Remove the stitches from the first 2 pegs, then skip next 2 pegs, remove the stitches from the next two pegs and place on yarn tail.

Continue process of skipping 2 pegs and picking up 2 stitches until you reach the end of the round.  Next, go around the loom again removing the remaining stitches. Cinch the top closed.  Weave ends in.

 

 

10 Comments

  • I ordered this but received double knit instead lol

  • Hi Anne, We have your note and so sorry for sending the wrong product. We will have the Premium Round Looms off to you tomorrow along with a prepaid label to return the rotating loom. Thanks for your patience.

  • I wish the pictures showed the arrows so I could determine if the yarn is in the right place after the end of the round. My yarn end never is back by the arrw.

  • Love the way this operates but I rarely double knit. It’s a whole new challenge for me. When I finished my stockinette cast on, I started my row one stitch to the left of the arrow on the loom. Not what I planned. I knit a few rows of stockinette to get the feel of the loom. I found that at the end of each row, I was ending up one more stitch over to the left. Clearly, I’m placing my working yarn in the wrong spot. Can anyone help?

  • Hi Melissa, What you are doing is OK and the starting peg will continue to move to the left. What we have found is if you move the yarn over to the same starting peg with each row, it will be a more even knit. It looks like you are skipping a peg when you start a row, but it will come out good and not leave any holes. Just be sure all pegs get wrapped as you return to starting point.

  • Thanks so much Pat.

  • Could you please tell us when we will be able to see videos on how to use this loom? I think I have it figured out but it would be nice to see someone doing it to be sure it is all right.

  • What size hats the this loom make. Does it make baby hats?

  • It makes adult size hats.

  • Videos will be available by the end of September, beginning of October.

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Aug 25, 2017

NEW ‘Rotating’ Double Knit Loom

 

Introducing the new ‘ROTATING’ Double Knit Loom!  This loom features the new ‘patent pending’ rotating base.   You no longer have to change positions as you knit, the loom rotates as you work!

Loom sits comfortably on your lap, or on a table. It’s compact and lightweight …so easy to use.

Knit in the round, or knit flat panels. Use some of the pegs, or all 52 of them, depending on width of knit desired.

 

 

The loom comes in parts for easy assembly: (6) legs, (1) inner loom, (1) outer loom, (1) rotating base, instruction booklet and knit hook.

It’s super fast to set up with snap-in-place parts.  Set it up with inner and outer loom, and 6 legs for double knitting. Or set it up with outer loom only, using 3 legs, for single knitting.

It’s so easy! Made of high quality durable plastic.  The booklet will show you how to quickly and easily configure the loom for your project.

 

This loom is great for Hats, Scarves, Cowls and Shawls…. whatever, and however, you choose to create; this loom can make creating your project FUN and EASY!  Recommend yarn #4 or #5 for double knitting, and #2, #3, or #4, for single knitting.

The Double Knit Loom includes very detailed instructions with lots of how-to photos, introducing the double knit ‘in the round’ process. Get started with these easy fun projects.   More patterns/projects coming soon!  Click on photo for pattern.

 

 

 

 

 

For faster knitting also check out the Loom Double Hooks, knits two pegs at the same time.

35 Comments

  • AWESOME!!!!! Where and when they be in retail stores

  • Hi Caroline,
    That just depends on the retail chain….how many of their stores that they schedule for the product and the timing of the purchase. I would just check with your local stores in September and maybe they can answer this for you.

  • I love it i’m from Portugal. When is ready to sale?

  • Hi Anabela,
    We can ship now when your order is received.
    Thanks, Pat

  • I have the new round and sock looms. Just I ordered the rotating loom and the double hooks and I can’t wait to get them.

  • I ordered last night before the coupon came out. That will teach me to jump the gun! LOL

  • I’m so anxious! I love all the looms, I have and used all of them to date. I can hardly wait.

  • What’s the widest selection n the hats it can make?
    Thanks

  • would love to buy one of these but where can I find them.

  • This looks interesting. Are there any video tutorials available?

  • When and where can I buy it?

  • can a video be made showing how this loom works. I have not done double knit and am not quite getting it if I need this loom

  • Are you able to knit a double knit scarf with this

  • Yes you can knit a double knit scarf up to approximately 16″ wide.

  • We are working on a series of videos, expecting to be up in September. We will announce as date gets closer.

  • Not yet, planning in September.

  • It is awesome for adult double knit hats, and single knit child to youth size depending on stitch. For flat panels in both single and double knit approximately 16″ wide.

  • Thank you!!

  • Thank you for your support of KB!!

  • I just purchased one the other day I can’t wait to get this loon and the new picks. I knit hats and scarves for homeless vets and this will help me get more done quicker Thanks for making this new loom and picks

  • I’m not seeing a price on this one. I purchased the premium round looms and the his & her sock looms which I saw prices but for some reason, not on this one. Looks very interesting!!

  • $29.99. Today Monday is the last day of the coupon code: “Doubleknit”

  • The loom sounds wonderful, but I am concerned with the fact that there are only 6 or was it 8 patterns to use with this loom. Will I be able to use any of my hat and scarf patterns on it? Particularly concerned with doing youth hats. I have a 10 year old and a 35 year old that I want to make hats for.

  • Hi Deborah,
    You can use all your scarf patterns up to 52 stitches on the loom in single knit or double.
    The hat knitting is same as working on a round loom. The youth hats are just a matter of what is the head measurement, and how deep do you want to make it. Also, I would experiment with different yarns. You may want to make them in the single knit.

  • What is the advantage of a double Loom vs. just one Loom? What can you make with the double?

  • Hi Ann, You use a double set of pegs to work in double knit. Before, all double knit was done in a flat panel and then sewn together. This loom allows you to create a double knit hat in circular and therefore, no seam. If you are not familiar with double knit, you may enjoy the videos on the website to see what can be done and some advantages of working in double knit as well as single knit.

  • Where I can find those looms thank you

  • Hi Olga, All available looms can be purchased on website http://www.knittingboard.com. Some hobby and craft stores will be carrying some looms, but you need to check with your local stores for availability.

  • Using the afghan loom and a figure eight stitch, how much yarn is needed to make an lapghan? What are the measurements of an average size lapghan?

  • When you do the tutorials will you please make one showing the various ways to work color changes. I have no problem with single knit but, I am having issues with the double knit. I have the new double knit round loom (which I love ??). I have watched the available videos, they aren’t quite enough. Showing how to carry yarn, start new rounds, attaching new yarn, would greatly help! I am not newbie, and as such, I know that these videos would be of immense value to new loom knitters! Also, would some one make a video showing how to create your own cable patterns. Cables are easy to learn with practice, but a mystery on how to combine different types. Hope that makes sense. Thanks!

  • We will keep this in mind for the next tutorials. Thank you.

  • If the fabric goes down the legs to the base, how do you do any length, without piling it up there? Thanks!

  • Hi Linda, If you are doing a hat, you can just roll it up until the hat is done. If its a flat panel, just allow the length to come out between the legs and there will be no limit as to how long the piece becomes.

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Aug 18, 2017

NEW…’His and Her’ Sock Loom Set

 

“OH look, honey, we can have matching socks”….

Brand new to the sock loom collection!  His & Her Sock Looms are here!

Now available, stationary fine gauge sock looms, with plastic pegs. The pegs are engineered specifically for ease of use, lifting yarn over pegs, and ‘staying put’ in the loom.

There are 2 looms in the set, the purple loom creates a large adult size sock, 64 pegs (HIS) and the orange loom creates an average adult size sock, 56 pegs (HERS).  In sizing, we refer to the width of the sock, or size of the leg opening. The length of the sock, and foot can be knit as long as desired.

No more counting pegs. Easy and superb for beginners!

 

The sock loom set includes full ‘step by step’ instructions for knitting socks in both sizes, adult and adult- large. DK weight sock yarn is recommended for best results.  Worsted #4 sock yarn can be used for a tighter knit, thicker sock.

Check out our new basic sock patterns!  Bethany Dailey’s  Keepin’ It Simple Socks, is great for men or for anyone with a larger width- knit with the purple loom.

For average adult size (width), use the orange loom, and knit the new Comfy Footies! designed by Isela Phelps.

For quick reference, check out the Heel & Toe video. Work your sock while following along with the video.

…We hope you enjoy! Happy Knitting!

 

 

27 Comments

  • Congrats on the new products. It says fine gauge, but doesn’t mention an actual number so what’s the p2p gauge on these sock looms?

  • These beautiful new sock looms are listed as Fine Gauge. Does that mean the measurement is 5/16″?

  • Love the idea of the looms themselves. Hate the (hetero)sexist stereotype your marketing is feeding. Human beings really don’t have that much sexual dimorphism. In general, males and females share most of the size range. Many men need smaller, many women need larger. The ‘his and her’s’ is appealing to the vision of the big strong man and dainty little woman that ends up causing a lot of harm for all of the people, and couples, that don’t fit that. It is a slap at the woman who needs a larger sock with all the implied message that she is not feminine,, that she is coarse and masculine. While the man (or even boy) who has to use the ‘girl loom’… well, obviously I’m not going to repeat here the slurs about men and boys who are considered feminine.

    And those are just the basic binary issues. The second you look outside of those, it gets worse.

    I love that you are doing two sizes of looms. People come in enough sizes, I’d love even more.
    But I’d particularly love it if you didn’t define my gender and the gender of everyone I’m making socks for by the size of their feet

  • I have had eperiance this type of knitting. the tenches is very good.

  • Hi, You have brought up a good evaluation. Thank you for your thoughts, and we will remember this in the future. Thanks

  • Yes, that is correct. 5/16″ from peg2peg.

  • Hi, Thanks for asking. The looms are 5/16″ from center of peg to center of peg.

  • i recently ordered these looms, always wanted to make socks,but found instructions to difficult to follow, now will try these and see what happens …

    happy sock making to me…

  • I love the new products! Thank you, as for me, I LOVE the his and her label! My husband was happy that he was going to get a pair of socks! Haha. I read about your company and I applaud you and your success. Keep up the good work! Thank you again : )

  • I amiss very excited by the new looms that are coming out . With the Oval shape I hope to be able to do toe-up socks more.

  • I am very excited by the new looms that are coming out . With the Oval shape I hope to be able to do toe-up socks more.

  • Thanks Carol,we appreciate all feedback. So are you working on your husbands socks?

  • I’m looking forward to trying it out, I think having oval loom will help, even though I knot and crochet my socks I do love loom sock knitting

  • I can’t wait to get these looms and think I will have to order today! I have all of the KB adjustable sock looms and like them well enough but these new ones sound so much easier to use, especially since they don’t need adjusting. I also have to say that I don’t have the same mindset as a previous poster and can’t say that those kind of thoughts ever entered my mind. My husband has small feet and would probably need one made on the “Hers” and I highly doubt that he will feel very feminine. People that I make things for aren’t going to care, or feel defined by, which loom I use. I love the “His and Her” name!

  • I have a question I saw online that 5/16 might be considered a SG = Small Gauge (5/16?,). So should I look for sock yarns that are “2” weight and not fingering weight 1? Maybe to use my sock stash combine 2 strands of weight 1 together. Or do I need baby weight or 3 light worsted or sport yarn for this loom? Sorry for so many questions. ….
    Well can’t wait to try it out already thinking of what yarns I may have. Thanks for any help.

  • I love all the AKB looms! I look fw to getting these. I also love thinking of them as his and hers. It makes it easy for me quickly recognize which one I need to grab, especially when I am in a hurry. Keep up the good work!!!

  • I totally agree with Amber – I think you should have used large/medium/small.

  • I got it today and started a sock. I LOVE IT!!! No more awkward end pegs so easy to use. Love the light weight of it to. It’s very easy to use on my hands. I have few different looms This is my favorite sock loom by far!! I????????????I may have to order second set so I can make two socks at a time. Thank you Pat for very fast shipping and coupon.

  • Oops my emojis went as question marks not happy faces

  • I have a question about one of the patterns for this loom. The Comfy Footies pattern. It says the cuff and leg should measure 7 inches. Is that correct for a footie sock?
    I love the feel of these looms and am anxious to try them out! Thanks for your help.

  • I just ordered my set and am looking forward to making socks! I ordered the Premium round loom set and the shipping was so quick! Love it! I have pretty much all of the other KB looms and I couldn’t be happier!! I think these new sock looms will be fun to take on little trips, so easy to tuck into a bag and go! Thanks KB looms!!!

  • Hi Sally, The designer feels that you are looking at a different pattern. There is no mention of 7″ for these footies. Please be sure you have downloaded the footies pattern. We will also check to be sure we have the links correct.

  • Will all of your new looms eventually be available in stores? I have purchased all of your other knitting looms either at Hobby Lobby or Joanna craft stores.

  • Hi Mary, It takes awhile for the store chains to order and receive and then get them into the planned stores. Just keep checking with your local stores, but realize that the chains choose which of their stores will receive each product. So some locations may have a product and another location may not. Also, large chains plan in advance, so it may take awhile.

  • With the double knitting, if connected as a hat, is it ‘trapped’ and limited to the 8 inch height? I’m thinking of the magic scarf type, you knit for say three feet in the round. I see if you double knit fkat it can come out and flow somehow but in the round, the legs limit flow-correct?
    I ordered mine so when it gets here I will experiment and enjoy all the new patterns.
    I love how it rotates.

  • Hi Jeannette,
    I agree that this is the first impression, but the hat scrunches and you can make it as deep as desired. There’s a lot of room for the round item as the space in the leg area is large. Once it is complete, you just slid it off the top of the loom.

  • I have just about all your looms. love them all but use s loom most, and sock looms

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Aug 11, 2017

Introducing…’Premium’ Round Loom Set

This has been a big request for years. Finally it’s here!!

The ‘Premium’ Round Loom Set is the ideal set for small gauge knitting, with pegs spaced at 3/8” apart.  This is great spacing for using all your favorite worsted weight yarns. The looms are made of high grade plastic with a smooth finish, and stay put pegs.

Knit hats in 3 sizes!  Works super great for shawls, scarves, home decor, baby items, and much more!

Loom sizes…   small 64 pegs, medium 72 pegs and large 80 pegs. Available now at KB Looms. Here’s a few of our current hat patterns that work on the new looms. Click on photo for pattern.

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14 Comments

  • Yay! Thank you.

  • BEAUTIFUL! I cannot wait to get my poor arthritic fingers on these! Thank you AKB!

  • I like Authentic Knitting Board looms. I have the oval loom set, but am used to using round ones. This looks tempting. I don’t see an extra peg where I can anchor my yarn, it would sure help me. Thanks.

  • What size hat does the small loom make infant or toddler

  • Are there any patterns other then hats for this loom?
    Also I am trying to secure these looms and it seems it won’t take my coupon codes
    Does it take more then one code?

  • Hi, Only one discount code can be entered for an order. We are working on many more patterns/projects. Just need to watch the blog each week.

  • I’ve been waiting so patiently!! Love all the looms I find it easy to use a round looms but have and use the oval hat loom as well.

  • Hi Donna, Thanks for your patience–we hope you enjoy.

  • i am the proud owner of all KB Looms!!! I love all of them. I was sure hoping these looms were next!!! Thank you KB!! I cannot wait to get my hands on these!!!!

  • Hi there, I am in South Africa and looms are normally very expensive to import with an exchange rate of almost 15 to 1. How much are these and what would the postage be to South Africa. :)

  • YAHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! I have often wondered why there was not a round kb loom . I am so happy. Lets do the happy dance.

  • Love the white hat with the flower!!! It’s so nice to see a pattern for a flower finally on loom not too many of those out there. Excited about all the new looms coming out!!! It’s nice see loom knitting getting some notice.

  • will future kits include the 4th loom in the smaller size? or be available separately?, for making preemie baby hats, mittens, and slippers.
    Thank you Pat
    Nicole

  • Hi Nicole, Let’s wait and see! Sounds interesting to me……

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Aug 7, 2017

Stitchology 35: Scalloped Shells

Can’t you just feel the sea breezes, hear the surf, and feel the sand in your toes just from looking at this month’s Scalloped Shells stitch? It may look complicated, but is fairly simple to do, especially using the stitch breakdown and the tutorial video you’ll find below.  Happy summer looming!   Something to note: even though this stitch works up in natural waves, it can still be used as a square for blankets, if you so desire.  This square would be a terrific one to place at the top and bottom edges with the scallop sides out, or you could simply block it so that the bottom is in a straight line for easier seaming together with other afghan blocks. ;)

We have changed the format just a little bit for our Stitchology Column.  Each of the featured stitches will be explained row by row via both written and video instructions.  We will be focusing on highlighting the repeating stitch pattern itself, so that you can enjoy the freedom of putting these new stitch patterns to use in your own projects as creativity strikes.  We hope you will enjoy this new way of learning new stitches with us! :)

Find all the previous Stitchology Columns at this link here.

Special Stitch Instructions

This stitch uses a multiple of 11 pegs (stitch itself expands to 15 loops per repeat, see the instructions on how to accomplish this on only 11 pegs.)

All knit stitches use the true knit stitch or “reverse purl”.

Double YO: E-wrap yarn around peg twice, KO, leaving the 2 wraps on peg.

KO: knit off (lift bottom loop over top loop and completely over the top of the peg)

Sl: slip (skip peg, do not work)

WY: working yarn

Wyib: working yarn carried to the back of the peg

YO: lay working yarn across the front of the peg.

K5tog: Lay WY on top of all loops on peg and KO one at a time.

 

Chart for Repeating Pattern Rows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repeating Pattern Rows for working as a flat panel (Cast on from left to right/counter clockwise a number divisible by 11. Begin 1st Row from right to left/clockwise):

Rows 1-3: knit

Row 4: purl

Row 5: *[k1, yo] twice, k1, [double yo] 5 times, [k1, yo] twice, k1; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 1: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 1.)

Peg 2: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 2.)

Peg 3: knit

Pegs 4-8: EW peg twice, KO bottom loop over 2 wrapped loops.

Peg 9: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 9.)

Peg 10: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 10.)

Peg 11: knit.

Repeat from * to end of row.

Row 6: *p5, wyib sl 5, p5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 11: purl.

Peg 10: purl the top loop and move to peg 11. Purl the bottom loop.

Peg 9: purl the top loop and move to peg 10. Purl the bottom loop.

Pegs 8-4: beginning with peg 4 and working to peg 8, unwrap each double EW and place on a stitch holder/cable needle.

Move loop from peg 9 to peg 7. Move the top loop from peg 10 to peg 8. Move the bottom loop from peg 10 to peg 9. Move the top loop from peg 11 to peg 10.  Pull out any extra slack in stitches just moved.

Peg 6: Place the held loops one at a time, beginning with the loop on the far left onto peg 6 (make sure they are not twisted).  Carry WY behind all the sts on peg 6.

Peg 5: Purl the stitch on peg 3 and move to peg 5.

Peg 4: Purl the top loop on peg 2 and move to peg 4.

Peg 3: Purl the bottom loop on peg 2 and move to peg 3.

Peg 2: Purl the top loop on peg 1 and move to peg 2.

Peg 1: purl. Remove any extra slack from stitches 1-5.

Repeat from * to end of row.

Row 7: *k5, wyib sl 5, k5; rep from * to end.

Row 8: *k5, k5tog, k5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Pegs 11-7: knit.

                Peg 6: Lay WY on top of all loops on peg 6 and KO one at a time.

Pegs 5-1: knit.

Repeat from * to end of row.

Rep rows 1-8 for desired length.

 

Repeating Pattern for working in the round (Begin from right to left/clockwise, cast on a number divisible by 11):

Rounds 1-3: knit

Round 4: purl

Round 5: *[k1, yo] twice, k1, [double yo] 5 times, [k1, yo] twice, k1; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 1: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 1.)

Peg 2: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 2.)

Peg 3: knit

Pegs 4-8: EW peg twice, KO bottom loop over 2 wrapped loops.

Peg 9: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 9.)

Peg 10: knit, then wrap back around to front of peg in a clockwise direction. (There will now be 2 loops on peg 10.)

Peg 11: knit.

Repeat from * to end of round.

Round 6: *p5, wyib sl 5, p5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Peg 1: move the loop on the top temporarily to peg 2. Purl the bottom loop.

Peg 2: purl the top loop and move back to peg 1. Move the next loop temporarily to peg 3. Purl the bottom loop.

Peg 3: purl the top loop and move back to peg 2. Purl the bottom loop.

Pegs 4-8: beginning with peg 4 and working to peg 8, unwrap each double EW and place on a stitch holder/cable needle.

Move loop from peg 9 to peg 7. Move the top loop from peg 10 to peg 8. Move the bottom loop from peg 10 to peg 9. Move the top loop from peg 11 to peg 10.  Pull out any extra slack in stitches just moved.

Peg 9: Place the held loops one at a time, beginning with the loop on the far left onto peg 6 (make sure they are not twisted).  Carry WY behind all the sts on peg 6.

Pegs 7-11: purl

Repeat from * to end of round.

Round 7: *k5, wyib sl 5, k5; rep from * to end.

Round 8: *k5, k5tog, k5; rep from * to end.

Peg by Peg Breakdown:

*Pegs 1-5: knit.

                Peg 6: Lay WY on top of all loops on peg 6 and KO one at a time.

Pegs 7-11: knit.

Repeat from * to end of round.

Rep rows 1-8 for desired length.

 

Have questions or comments?  Please feel free to leave a message for Bethany in the comments below.

2 Comments

  • Need a book on what stitches mean and how to do them

  • There are a ton of sources for learning all the stitches out there. :) Here is a link to the How-To section of KnittingBoard.com: http://www.knittingboard.com/loom-knitting-how-tos/ There is also a tab at this same site that contains video instructions as well. Another excellent source for beginning loom knitting is the book by Isela Phelps, Loom Knitting Primer, which can be found in some craft stores, as well as Amazon.

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